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Princeton NJ Libraries Announcements

November Events at Princeton Public Library

Through Dec. 21

Exhibition: The Princeton Plan: 70 Years of School Segregation

Presented in partnership with the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society and the Historical Society of Princeton, this exhibit explores the local impact and national reverberations of the 1948 merger of Nassau Street School and the Witherspoon School for Colored Children, a landmark in school integration. Princeton Room

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities

 

 

Lit Lab

Thursday, Nov. 1, 4 p.m.

Students in first through fifth grades are invited to join us to read a book and create or explore a hands-on maker activity inspired by the story. STEAM Studio

 

Girl Code

Thursdays, 4:30 p.m., Nov. 1, 15

Girls in grades 4 to 8 are invited to drop in for an hour of an all-female coding class exploring the programming language Python. In each session, a core concept will be covered, along with an exercise to put your new skills to the test. No coding experience necessary. Limited to 18 participants or bring your own device. Technology Center

 

 

Author Talk: Helena Rosenblatt

"The Lost History of Liberalism: From Ancient Rome to the 21st Century"

Thursday, Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m.

The author, professor of history at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, discusses her book that challenges our most basic assumptions about a political creed that has become a rallying cry — and a term of derision — in today’s increasingly divided public square. Taking readers from ancient Rome to today, the book traces the evolution of the words “liberal” and “liberalism,” revealing the heated debates that have taken place over their meaning. Rosenblatt debunks the popular myth of liberalism as a uniquely Anglo-American tradition centered on individual rights. She shows that it was the French Revolution that gave birth to liberalism and Germans who transformed it. Only in the mid-twentieth century did the concept become widely known in the United States—and then, as now, its meaning was hotly debated. Community Room

 

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press.

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

Mercer County Community ID Card Program

Thursdays, noon-2 p.m. and 5-6:45 p.m., Nov. 1, 8, 15, 29

All Mercer County residents are eligible for this photo ID card, which provides the cardholder’s personal identifying information, medical risk factors, and emergency contact information. This privately issued card, sponsored by the One Community Coalition, may be used at social service agencies, schools, clinics, parks, post offices, and to access basic municipal or health services and as a form of identification by check cashing companies, banks, retail stores or other establishments. The Latin American Legal Defense & Education Fund, a nonprofit advocacy group, issues the card. There is a $15 cost ($10 for youth under 21 and seniors over 65) per card to cover expenses.

 Documentation required: Proof of identity with a photo: Any state/county/country ID or driver’s license; passport or consulate authentication; green card or work permit; welfare card with original birth certificate AND proof of address in your name; lease, utility bill, financial account statement, money transfer order, hospital bill, etc.  For additional info, see www.laldef.org.

 Co-sponsored by the library and the Latin American Legal Defense & Education Fund.

 

 

Job Seekers Session

Fridays, 9:45 a.m., Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

The library and Professional Services Group of Mercer County sponsor sessions for professionals who are seeking new employment and contracting opportunities throughout the region. Please check the library’s website for specific topics. Community Room

 

 

Film: “Tully”

Friday, Nov. 2, 6:30 p.m.

A mother of three including a newborn forms a unique bond with a thoughtful, surprising, and sometimes challenging young nanny named Tully. 1 hour, 36 minutes. Community Room

 

Math Circle for Middle Schoolers

Saturday, Nov. 3, 3 p.m

Students in grades 6-8 engage in hands-on activities and solve  puzzles designed by high school students at PRISMS. Important math concepts, including functions, geometry and combinatorics, will be explored. Co-Lab

 

Knit for Others Knitting Sessions

Sunday, Nov. 4

1 p.m. -  Join us in the Community Room as we knit hats for donation. We will have patterns and yarn to share but feel free to bring your own as well as your own knitting needles. Basic knitting skills required.

 

4 p.m. - Instructors from Pins and Needles will give a class for beginners (teens and adults). Limited to 20, registration is required through princetonlibrary.org.

 

Maker Mondays: Build with Lego

Mondays, Nov. 5, 19, 4 p.m.

Children in grades 1-5 are invited to participate in a non-competitive community-based Lego session, including building time and round-table discussion. Duplo blocks will be available for younger children outside the Story Room. 

 

Mystery Book Group

Monday, Nov. 5, 7:30 p.m.

The group discusses “Snowblind” by Ragnar Jonasson. Quiet Room

 

Fall Family Movie: “Paddington”

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 3 p.m.

A young Peruvian bear travels to London in search of a home. Finding himself lost and alone at Paddington Station, he meets the kindly Brown family, who offer him a temporary haven. Rated PG. 1 hour, 35 minutes. Community Room

 

Writers Room

Tuesdays, Nov. 6, 20, 7 p.m.

Writers receive constructive feedback at these sessions, during which participants read their work and members offer suggestions. Works read are usually less than 15 minutes long, so there is time to discuss a number of pieces during each session. While nonfiction has been a focus in the past, fiction writers are welcome. Participants range from published authors to those looking to improve their skills. The group is led by Loretta and Fred Wish. Quiet Room

 

Fall Family Movie: “Paddington 2”

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 3 p.m.

Paddington, now happily settled with the Brown family and a popular member of the local community, picks up a series of odd jobs to buy the perfect present for his Aunt Lucy’s 100th birthday, only for the gift to be stolen. Rated PG. 1 hour, 43 minutes. Community Room

 

Lit Lab

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 4 p.m.

Students in first through fifth grades are invited to join us to read a book and create or explore a hands-on maker activity inspired by the story. STEAM Studio

 

Princeton University Concerts Lecture: Abigail Washburn and Wu Fei

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 7 p.m.

In advance of their Nov. 8 “Beijing Meets Banjo” performance at Princeton University, banjo virtuoso Abigail Washburn and guzheng master Wu Fei give a talk about their show. Newsroom

 

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Concerts.

 

Author Talk: Rosina Lozano

"An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States"

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 7 p.m.

The author discusses her book, a political history of the Spanish language in the United States from the Mexican cession in 1848 through World War II, with some discussion of the following decades and present-day concerns. Community Room

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

Contemporary Fiction Book Group

Thursday, Nov. 8, 10:30 a.m.

The group discusses “The Ninth Hour” by Alice McDermott. Conference Room

 

Black Voices Book Group

Thursday, Nov. 8, 7 p.m.

The group discusses “Behold the Dreamers” by Imbolo Mbue. Princeton Room

 

 

Fall Family Movie: “Peter Rabbit”

Thursday, Nov. 8, 4:30 p.m.

The stubborn and naughty Peter Rabbit causes chaos in the home and garden of an irritable human named Mr. McGregor. However, their rivalry grows even more heated when they both fall in love with a new neighbor who adores animals. Rated PG. 1 hour, 35 minutes. Community Room

 

 

Code It

Thursday, Nov. 8, 4:30 p.m.

Fourth- through eighth-graders are invited to drop in for an hour to learn to code using the programming language Python. Each session includes a core concept and exercise. No coding experience is necessary. Technology Center

 

 

Brian W. Kernighan

"Million, Billions, Zillions: Defending Yourself in a World of Too Many Numbers" 

Thursday, Nov. 8, 7 p.m.

The computer scientist and Princeton University professor discusses his new book in which, using examples from journalism, adverstising and politics, he demonstrates how numbers can mislead and misrepresent. Community Room

 

Writing Workshop

Thursdays, Nov. 8, 22, 7 p.m.

Writers who are working on book-length work are invited to receive constructive critique from peers. The group is designed so that writers can help other writers of fiction and book-length nonfiction to strengthen characters and story structure. Participant range from published authors to those looking to improve their skills. Workshop leader is Don Donato. Conference Room

 

 

 

Maps, Maps and More Maps!

Friday, Nov. 9, 4:30 p.m.

This workshop will introduce children in firsts through fifth grade to maps and mapping. We will examine a range of maps from different historical times, paying attention to how they convey information. Using what they learned, participants will create their own maps. Participation is limited to 15 children accomopanied by an adult. Tickets for the workshop will be available at the Youth Services desk beginning at 4 p.m. STEAM Studio

 

Resume and Interview Skills Workshop

Saturday, Nov. 10, 10-11:30 a.m.

This workshop, appropriate for English language learners and native speakers, covers the basics of writing a strong resume. Using “power verbs” in bullet points that instantly show hiring managers you are a good fit will be covered along with how to format a resume. Interview tips to help increase your chances of getting hired will also be discussed. Conference Room

 

Part of the American Dream Literacy Initiative of the American Library Association made possible through funding from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation.

 

 

Go Between Club

Saturday, Nov. 10, 2 p.m.

All sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students are welcome to join us on the second Saturday of every month for a fun discussion of books and other interests. Conference Room

 

Science Circle

Saturday, Nov. 10, 3 p.m.

Budding scientists in third through sixth grades are invited to participate in hands-on science activities designed by high school students at PRISMS. Important concepts, focusing on a different scientific discipline each month, will be explored.  Co-Lab

 

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science.

 

Family Tech Time: Electronic Craft: Night Light

Saturday, Nov. 10, 3 p.m.

This hands-on workshop introduces participants to creative projects and making a functional night light. We’ll use accessible materials to learn the basics of circuit building and the principles of energy. Ages 5 to 8. Tickets for the workshop will be available at the Youth Services desk starting at 2:30 p.m. Limited to 15 participants or until supplies last. Third floor

 

 

Film and Panel Discussion: “Let There Be Light: The 100 Year Journey to Fusion”

Sunday, Nov. 11, 2 p.m.

This documentary tells the story of scientists from 37 countries who are building the most complex machine ever attempted in the hope of illuminating the way to produce clean, cheap, abundant energy for millions of years. Nuclear fusion, the ultimate source of energy in the universe, has been the holy grail of energy for many decades. The possibility that it might be achievable on Earth has driven scientists to the edge of reason for almost a century.

 

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion featuring scientists from Princeton Plasma Physics Lab including scientist/doctoral candidate Charles Swanson, research physicist and ITER expert David Johnson and science education program leader Shannon Greco. The panel will be moderated by Brian Krause, scientist/doctoral candidate and producer of the radio program “These Vibes are Too Cosmic.” Community Room

 

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.

 

PSG Workshop

Monday, Nov. 12, 10 a.m.

Professional Services Group of Mercer County presents a series of workshops designed to help those in transition build technical skills to use in their job search. Technology Center

 

Co-sponsored by the library and the Professional Service Group of Mercer County.

 

 

Poets at the Library

Monday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m.

Featured poets Lois Harrod and Tony Gruenwald read from their works for 20 minutes each followed by an open-mic session. Harrod’s most recent chapbook is “And She Took the Heart.” A three-time recipient of a New Jersey Council on the Arts fellowship, Harrod is widely published in literary journals and online ezines from American Poetry Review to Zone 3. She teaches creative writing at The College of New Jersey. Gruenwald works for the New York Public Radio Archives and acts as production manager for Edison Literary Review. Newsroom

 

Co-sponsored by the library, Delaware Valley Poets and the U.S. 1 Poets' Cooperative.

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

Fall Family Movie: “The Incredibles”

Tuesday, Nov. 13, 3 p.m.

Known to the world as superheroes Mr. Incredible and Elastigirl, Bob Parr and his wife Helen were among the world's greatest crime fighters, saving lives and battling evil on a daily basis. Fifteen years later, they have been forced to adopt civilian identities and retreat to the suburbs to live "normal" lives with their three kids, Violet, Dash and Jack-Jack. Itching to get back into action, Bob gets his chance when a mysterious communication summons him to a remote island for a top-secret assignment. Rated PG. 1 hour, 55 minutes.

 

 

Open Archives: Farming the Garden State

Tuesday, Nov. 13, 6:30 p.m.

The Open Archives series allows visitors to interact with little-seen artifacts and documents from the Historical Society of Princeton’s vast collection. Materials are presented with minimal interpretation, encouraging visitors to make observations, ask questions and be the historians themselves. A representative of the Historical Society will be on hand to share information and answer questions. In this session, visitors can explore ledgers, bills and ephemera that illustrate Princeton’s important agricultural past. Newsroom, Discovery Center

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

Fall Family Movie: “A Wrinkle in Time”

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 3 p.m.

Meg meets three supernatural beings who transport her through the universe to rescue her father, who mysteriously disappeared and is being held captive by an evil force. Rated PG. 1 hour, 49 minutes. Community Room

 

 

Origami Club for All Ages

Wednesday Nov. 14, 6:30 p.m.

Anyone interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new, often seasonal, folding. Beginners are welcome. Adults must accompany children younger than 8. Quiet Room

 

Film: “Lean on Pete”

Friday, Nov. 16, 6 p.m.

A teen and the aging racehorse he’s been hired to care for embark on a journey across the new American frontier when the boy learns the horse is bound for slaughter. 2 hours, 2 min. Community Room

 

Preschool Fair

Saturday, Nov. 17, 11 a.m.

Representatives from area preschools provide information about school programs, curriculum, philosophy and the admission process at this two-hour annual event. Community Room

 

Chemistry Saturdays

Saturday, Nov. 17, 1 p.m.

Graduate students from Princeton University’s chemistry department conduct exciting hands-on experiments that make science fun. For children 3-13 years old; children 8 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. STEAM Studio

 

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Chemistry Graduate Student Organization.

 

Trenton Brass Quintet Plus One

Sunday, Nov. 18, 2 p.m.

Under the leadership of Karl I. Megules, the group will perform selections from the 1400s to the present day including special jazz arrangements and repertoire including ragtime, Disney, show tunes, and music for brass quintets. Community Room

 

2018 Best Picks

Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2 p.m.

Library staff present their favorite books, podcasts, and more from 2018 in time for the holiday season. Newsroom

 

PSO Soundtracks

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 6:30 p.m.

Community Room

 

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

 

Library Live at Labyrinth

Library Live at Labyrinth is a collaborative reading series between the library and Labyrinth Books. All events begin at 6:30 p.m., unless otherwise stated, in the lower level of the book store at 122 Nassau St.

 

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 6 p.m.

Anthony Appiah on “The Lies that Bind”

Anthony Appiah on “The Lies that Bind: Rethinking Identity”

The author discusses his revealing exploration of how the collective identities that shape our polarized world are riddled with contradiction. Appiah writes the “Ethicist” column for The New York Times and is professor emeritus at Princeton University and professor of philosophy at New York University. Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau St

 

Wednesday, Nov. 28, 6 p.m.

Tamsen Wolff: “Juno’s Swans”

Wolff, a professor in Princeton University’s English department, discusses her first novel that captures the experience of first love and its inevitable partner, first heartbreak. Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau St.

 

Co-sponsored by the library, Labyrinth Books and Princeton University’s Humanities Council.

 

Thursday, Nov. 29, 6 p.m.

Stephen Greenblatt (author of “Tyrant”) in Conversation with Jeff Dolven

World-renowned Shakespeare scholar Stephen Greenblatt and acclaimed critic, Renaissance scholar and poet Jeff Dolven explore Shakespeare’s insight into bad rulers. Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau St.

 

 

Historical Fiction Book Group

Thursday, Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m.

Camilla Townsend, professor of history at Rutgers University, leads a discussion of “News of the World” by Paulette Jiles.

 

The Historical Fiction Book Group features scholar-led book discussions about the fictional elements and nonfictional historic and regional context of selected books. Held at the headquarters of the Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

 

Author Talk: Keith Whittington

“Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech”

Monday, Nov. 19, 7 p.m.

In his new book, the author and William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University argues that universities must protect and encourage vigorous free speech in order to fulfill their most basic, fundamental, and essential purposes, including fostering freedom of thought, ideological diversity, and tolerance. Examining such hot-button issues as trigger warnings, safe spaces, hate speech, disruptive protests, speaker disinvitations, the use of social media by faculty, and academic politics, the book describes the dangers of empowering campus censors to limit speech and enforce orthodoxy. Community Room

 

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press.

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

Build and Launch Web Apps
Tuesdays, Nov. 20, 27, 4:30 p.m. 
In this multi-week program, 8- to 14-year-olds  will use the KidzIdeazTECH to learn code to design their own web application and launch it on the web. Technology Center 

 

 

Fred Miller

Sunday, Nov. 25, 3 p.m.

Library favorite Fred Miller presents “Happy Days Are Here Again: The Jazz Age and the Birth of Radio.” Community Room

 

Engaged Retirement: Downsizing and Organizing

Mon., Nov. 26, 7 p.m.

Professional organizer John Odalen shares easy techniques for getting and staying organized. New ways to think about possessions will be discussed along with options for disposing of items you no longer want or need.  Newsroom

 

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center.

 

Gould Lecture

Tuesday, Nov. 27, 6:30 p.m.

Ken Norman of Princeton University’s Department of Psychology presents the annual lecture endowed by the family of Dr. Kenneth Gould. Community Room

 

To Be Discussed (TBD)

Tuesday, Nov. 27, 7 p.m.

All high school students are welcome to participate in this monthly discussion of great books, films, music, non-fiction, poetry, and all things cultural. Participants may also help create book displays and reading lists for the library, take group trips to see current films, and do group-reads. Story Room

 

Author Talk: Sayu Bhojwani

"People Like Us: The New Wave of Candidates Knocking at Democracy’s Door" 

Wednesday, Nov. 28, 6:30 p.m.

The author, political scientist and immigrant of Indian descent shares the stories of a diverse and persevering range of local and state politicians from across the country who are challenging the status quo, winning against all odds, and leaving a path for others to follow.

 

Bhojwani will be joined in conversation by Councilwoman Leticia Fraga, the first Latinx elected to Princeton Council. Community Room

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.­­­­­­­­­­

 

All Princeton Public Library programs are free and open to the public. If programs require registration, preference is given to library cardholders. The physically challenged should contact the library at (609) 924-9529 48 hours before any program with questions about special accommodations.

 

Opinions expressed during programming at Princeton Public Library do not necessarily reflect the views of the library, its staff, trustees or supporters.

 

The library is in the Sands Library Building at 65 Witherspoon St. in Princeton, NJ. Convenient parking is available on neighboring streets and in the borough-operated Spring Street Garage, which is adjacent to the library. For more information about library programs and services, call (609) 924-9529 or visit www.princetonlibrary.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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