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January/February Events at Princeton Public Library

Author Jeffrey Colvin: “Africaville: A Novel”

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 7 p.m.

The author gives a talk about his debut novel, a family saga set in a small Nova Scotia town settled by formerly enslaved people. Publisher's Weekly calls "Africaville: A Novel,” which explores concepts of racial identity, passing, interracial relationships and the meaning of home, "a penetrating, fresh look at the indomitable spirit of black pioneers and their descendants." Colvin served in the United States Marine Corps and is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy, Harvard University and Columbia University where he received an MFA in fiction. His work has appeared in Narrative, Hot Metal Bridge, Painted Bride Quarterly, Rain Taxi Review of Books, The Millions, The Brooklyn Rail and elsewhere. He is a member of the National Book Critics Circle and is an assistant editor at Narrative magazine. He lives in New York City. The snow date for this event is Feb. 4. Community Room 

 

Lecture: “Palmer Square: A History”

Thursday, Jan. 30, 7 p.m.

Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood historian Shirley Satterfield gives a presentation on the history of Palmer Square and the lasting effect of urban renewal on Princeton's African-American community. Historic photographs and documents from the Historical Society of Princeton will be featured. Presented in partnership with the Historical Society of Princeton and the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society. Newsroom 

 

“Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am”

Friday, Jan. 31, 6 p.m.

This documentary examines the life of American novelist, essayist, editor, teacher, and professor emeritus at Princeton University Toni Morrison who died last year at the age of 88. Morrison was the first African-American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature and is known for her nuanced discussion of race in America. Through the use of archival material, art and interviews with Oprah Winfrey, Angela Davis and Morrison herself, the film presents pieces of Morrison’s life, from her childhood in the working-class steel town of Lorain, Ohio, to her journey as a novelist and public intellectual. 1 hour, 59 minutes. Newsroom 

 

Presented in partnership with Princeton Public Schools.

 

 

Concert: “Comes Love: The Songs of Billie Holiday”

Sunday, Feb. 2, 4 p.m.

Demetria Joyce Bailey performs the songs that Billie Holiday loved to sing including hits such as "God Bless the Child" and "Lover Man" and lesser-known selections including "Gloomy Sunday" and "Did I Remember." Bailey, an actress on the stage and screen, possesses a powerful vocal range and sings old-school jazz and blues in the tradition of Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan. Community Room 

 

Friday Feature Films

 

Friday Feature Film: “Wild Rose”

Friday, Jan. 10, 6:30 p.m.

Recently released from prison, a mother of two and aspiring country singer from Glasgow dreams of becoming a star in Nashville. R. 1 hour, 41 minutes. Community Room 

 

Friday Feature Film: “The Farewell”

Friday, Jan. 24, 6:30 p.m. 

Partially based on director Lulu Wang's experiences, this 2019 dramatic comedy follows a family who, rather than tell their grandmother that she is dying, plans a large gathering instead. PG.1 hour, 40 minutes. Community Room 

 

Friday Feature Film: “Can You Ever Forgive Me”

Friday, Feb. 7, 6:30 p.m.

This biographical drama, based on the confessional memoir of the same name by Lee Israel, stars Melissa McCarthy and follows Israel's attempts to revitalize her failing writing career by forging letters from deceased authors and playwrights. 1 hour, 47 minutes. Community Room 

 

Friday Feature Film: “Judy”

Friday, Feb. 21, 6:30 p.m. 

Renee Zellweger stars as Judy Garland in this 2019 biographical drama that tells the story of Garland's run of sold-out shows in 1968 London. PG-13. 1 hour, 58 minutes. Community Room 

 

Documentaries

 

  “They Shall Not Grow Old”

Thursday, Feb. 6, 6:30 p.m. 

Academy Award-winner Peter Jackson presents never-before-seen footage of World War I and shares the stories of men who were there. Using groundbreaking computer restoration technology on archival footage that is more than 100 years old, Jackson's team creates a moving depiction of WWI in restored, vivid color and retiming of film frames. The footage is drawn from the BBC and British Imperial War Museums' archives. 1 hour, 39 minutes.

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Community Room 

 

“How Jack Became Black”

Wednesday, Feb. 19, 7 p.m.

Filmmaker Eli Steele explores issues of race and identity politics inspired by his own experiences and those faced by his children. Part of the third multiracial generation in his family, Steele's son, Jack, was denied entry to a public school after Steele refused to check a box identifying his ethnicity. 1 hour, 24 minutes. 

 

Princeton International Cinema Series

The Princeton International Cinema series is a collaboration of the library, the International Employees Group at Princeton University, the Davis International Center and the Princeton Garden Theatre. Tickets ($11.50 general admission, $9 faculty and seniors, $8 students, $6.75 Princeton University ID holders, library cardholders and Princeton Garden Theatre members) may be purchased online at thegardentheatre.com or at the door. The library will also offer a limited number of free tickets while supplies last for each screening. Call (609) 924-9529, ext. 1220 for availability. Princeton Garden Theater

 

 “Ramen Shop”

Thursday, Jan. 9, 5:30 p.m.

When a young ramen chef from Japan finds his late Singaporean mother's journal, he takes it with him to her native country, hoping to put together the story of his family and his life. 1 hour, 30 minutes. Country of origin: Singapore/Japan/France. In Japanese, English, Mandarin and Cantonese with English subtitles. 2019. 1 hour, 30 minutes.

 

 “Cold Case Hammarskjöld”

Thursday, Feb. 6, 5:30 p.m.

Danish filmmaker Mads Brugger's documentary examines the mysterious 1961 plane crash that killed United Nations Secretary General Dag Hammarskjöld and most of the crew. After scores of false starts, dead ends and elusive interviews later, Brügger and his sidekick, Swedish Göran Björkdahl, begin to uncover something more monumental than anything they’d initially imagined. 2 hours, 8 minutes.

 

Other Films

 

“Downton Abbey”

Sunday, Jan. 12, 3 p.m.

Join us for tea and a screening of the 2019 film based on the popular British historical period drama. The film follows the aristocratic Crawley family and their household staff as they prepare for a visit from King George V and Queen Mary. PG. 2 hours, 2 minutes. Community Room 

 

“Beethoven Lives Upstairs”

Saturday, Feb. 1, 3 p.m.

Based on a popular audio play and featuring more than 25 excerpts of Beethoven’s best-loved works, this family movie tells the story of a young boy who develops a friendship with a boarder in his parents’ house, Ludwig von Beethoven. 52 minutes. Newsroom 

 

Presented in partnership with Princeton University Concerts.

 

“Fistful of Popcorn” Oscars Road Show

Sunday, Feb. 2, 1:30 p.m.

Film reviewers Roger Brown, Marilyn Campbell, Janet Stern and Carol Welsch of Princeton Community Television's long-running "Fistful of Popcorn" offer their take on the 2020 Oscars season including opinions about this year's Academy Award-nominated films. Members of the audience will be invited to share their opinions at the event which includes door prizes and refreshments. Community Room 

 

 “Chernobyl”

Tuesdays, Jan. 7, 14, 21, 28 and Feb. 4, 6:30 p.m.

“Chernobyl,” the five-part miniseries which dramatizes the story of the 1986 nuclear accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine, Soviet Union is screened. The series about one of the worst man-made catastrophes in history, is a co-production of HBO and Sky. Community Room

 

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Community Room 

 

 

Unforgettable Duos of the Silver Screen

Unforgettable Duos of the Silver Screen is a series of six classic films featuring legendary Hollywood couples. Tea and cookies will be served. Screening are at 3 p.m. in the Community Room.

 

Unforgettable Duos of the Silver Screen: “To Have and Have Not”

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 3 p.m.

Loosely based on Ernest Hemingway's 1937 novel of the same name, “To Have and Have Not" features Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. The film centers on the World War II romance between Bogart's freelancing fisherman and Bacall's beautiful American drifter which is complicated by the growing French resistance. 1 hour, 40 min.

 

Unforgettable Duos of the Silver Screen: “The Philadelphia Story”

Wednesday, Feb. 5, 3 p.m.

The 1940 romantic comedy features Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn. On the eve of the wedding of a Philadelphia socialite (Hepburn), her ex-husband (Grant) shows up with tabloid journalists in tow. 1 hour, 52 minutes.

 

Unforgettable Duos of the Silver Screen: “I Love You Again”

Wednesday, Feb. 12, 3 p.m.

William Powell and Myrna Loy star in this 1940 romantic comedy based on the novel by Octavos Roy Cohen. The film tells the story of Larry, a wealthy but boring businessman who discovers he's actually a con artist and that he loves his soon-to-be ex-wife. 1 hour, 39 minutes.

 

Unforgettable Duos of the Silver Screen: “Top Hat”

Wednesday, Feb. 19, 3 p.m.

The 1935 musical comedy pairs longtime partners Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in a story of dance, love and mistaken identity. 1 hour, 41 minutes.

 

Unforgettable Duos of the Silver Screen: “It Happened One Night”

Wednesday, Feb. 26, 3 p.m.

Featuring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, this 1934 romantic is the story of a runaway heiress who gets more than she bargained for when she teams up with down-on-his-luck reporter in an attempt to get back to her new husband. 1 hour, 45 minutes.

 

Unforgettable Duos of the Silver Screen: “The Quiet Man”

Wednesday, March 4, 3 p.m.

Featuring John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara this 1952 romance is the story of a boxer who finds love when he returns to his native Ireland after accidentally killing an opponent in the ring. 2 hours, 9 minutes.

 

 Author Talks

 

Library Live at Labyrinth: Susan Stewart: “The Ruins Lesson: Meaning and Material in Western Culture”

Wednesday, Feb. 26, 6:00 p.m.

Susan Stewart, the Avalon Foundation University Professor in the Humanities and professor of English at Princeton University, discusses her most recent book in which she explores how ruins have become so valued in Western culture and central to our art and literature. Labyrinth Books

Presented in partnership with Labyrinth Books.

 

Library Live at Labyrinth: Edward Posnett: “Strange Harvests: The Hidden Histories of Seven Natural Objects”

Thursday, Feb. 27, 6 p.m.

The author discusses his book that traces the harvesting, processing and trading of seven uncommon products that originate in some of the most remote areas of the world. Labyrinth Books

Presented in partnership with Labyrinth Books.

 

Authors Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills: “A Proud Heritage: The African American Presence and Contribution in the Sourland Mountain Region and Surrounding Areas”

Monday, Feb. 10, 7 p.m.

Co-authors Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills will speak on the research for and contents of their book, "If These Stones Could Talk: African American Presence in the Hopewell Valley, Sourland Mountain, and Surrounding Regions of New Jersey." Based on over a decade's worth of research, the authors present a history of the cemetery and a unique window into African-American history in New Jersey. According to James McPherson, professor emeritus at Princeton University: "Rooted in an amazing amount of research, and written with grace and flair, 'If These Stones Could Talk' brings to light a rich past that had almost been lost." Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Community Room 

 

Author Raphaël Liogier: “Heart of Maleness: An Exploration”

Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m.

Sparked by the #metoo movement, philosopher and sociologist Raphaël Liogier examines the underlying causes of gender inequality and how it can be fought. Liogier is a professor at Sciences Po Aix-en-Provence and teaches at the Collège international de philosophie in Paris. He is currently a visiting scholar at Columbia University’s Council for European Studies.  Community Room 

 

Book Brunch Featuring Kelly Simmons, Amy Impellizzeri and Kate Moretti

Sunday, Feb. 16, 11 a.m.

Three award-winning authors who are part of the Tall Poppy Writers group converse with the audience and each other about their most recent books, life, publishing and more. Writers include: Kelly Simmons: "Where She Went”; Amy Impellizzeri: "Why We Lie"; and Kate Moretti: "In Her Bones." Doors open at 11 a.m. when tea and pastries will be served. The discussion begins at 11:30 a.m. Snow date will be Feb. 23. Community Room 

 

Author Marjan Kamali: “The Stationary Shop”

Sunday, Feb. 23, 3 p.m.

The author speaks at the paperback release of her acclaimed novel, a love story about a young couple living amidst the political upheaval of 1953 Tehran. on When violence erupts on the eve of their marriage, a result of the coup d’etat that forever changes their country’s future, the couple is separated it and it seems they will never see each other again. Born in Turkey to Iranian parents, Marjan Kamali studied English Literature at UC Berkeley and received her MBA from Columbia University and an MFA from New York University. Her debut novel was "Together Tea." Community Room 

Music

 

The Songs and Sounds of Robert Burns

Saturday, Jan. 25, 3 p.m.

Singer Fiona Tyndall and a five-piece band that includes fiddlers and a harpist performs a program featuring Scottish poetry and songs from Robert Burns. Community Room 

 

Back-to-Back Beethoven

Sunday, Jan. 26, 1:30 p.m.

Pianists and other musicians from the community perform a wide variety of works by Ludwig van Beethoven during this three-hour event. Kristin Cahill of The New School for Music Study will open the event, which marks the 250th anniversary year of Beethoven's birth, with a brief lecture about his life and compositional periods. Musicians of all ages and levels of proficiency are encouraged to perform. Register through the events calendar.

Presented in partnership with The New School for Music Study.

 

Lectures

 

McCarter Live at the Library Featuring Emily Mann and Rachel Bonds: “Art, Life, Mentorship, and Motherhood”

Sunday, Jan. 5, 3 p.m.

McCarter Theatre Center Artistic Director and Resident Playwright Emily Mann and playwright Rachel Bonds engage in conversation. They will discuss their lives in the theater, working motherhood and their collaboration on Bonds’ plays "Goodnight, Nobody," premiering at McCarter Jan. 10 through Feb. 9, and "Five Mile Lake." Mann will reflect on her artistic legacy as a champion for new voices, the work of women, and the next generation of playwrights in the American theater and about her special connection with and mentorship of Bonds. Bonds will talk about how new motherhood and other aspects of her life inspired the writing of both "Goodnight, Nobody" and her essay “Working Like a Mother” for HowlRound Theatre Commons at Emerson College. A Q&A with the audience will follow the discussion. Community Room 

Presented in partnership with McCarter Theatre Center.

 

 

Podcast Discussion: “Anniversary” by Rachel Bonds

Saturday, Jan. 11, 2 p.m.

In advance of the official opening of "Goodnight Nobody," the new play by Rachel Bonds at McCarter Theatre Center through Feb. 9, we will listen to Bonds' comic drama "Anniversary," part of the "Playing On Air" Podcast series. Afterward, Paula Alekson of McCarter and librarian Janie Hermann lead a discussion exploring the themes of Rachel Bonds' works. Community Room 

Co-sponsored by the library and the McCarter Theatre Center.

 

PSO Soundtracks with Maria LoBiondo

Wednesday, Jan. 15, 7 p.m.

Storyteller and writer Maria LoBiondo gives a talk in advance of the orchestra's Jan. 18-19 concert featuring clarinetist Kinan Azmeh. The Soundtracks series of lectures is intended to deepen the concert-going experience by explaining more about the music being performed and the orchestra itself. Community Room 

Presented in partnership with Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

 

SCORE Seminar: Small Business Trends in 2020

Tuesday, Jan. 21, 6:30 p.m.

Amulya Garga conducts a workshop that looks at business trends that entrepreneurs can use to improve their competitive advantage and business impact. Registration required through the SCORE Princeton website. Newsroom 

Presented in partnership with SCORE Princeton.

 

Engaged Retirement: Tax Updates for the 2019 Filing Season

Monday, Jan. 27, 7 p.m.

Joseph C Maida, managing member of the accounting firm Maida & Maida, gives an overview of updates for the 2019 tax year. Newsroom 

Presented in partnership with Princeton Senior Resource Center.

 

 

Continuing Conversations on Race: The Green Book: An American Journey Through White Racism

Monday, Feb. 3, 7 p.m.

Members of Not In Our Town Princeton, an interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Tonight's presentation, "The Green Book: An American Journey Through White Racism," covers how the denial of equal accommodation for all Americans stimulated resistance, initiated lawsuits, created a travel guide and nurtured an entrepreneurial class that built new businesses to provide those accommodations. Community Room 

Presented in partnership with Not In Our Town Princeton.

 

SCORE Seminar: Creating a Business Model and Business Plan

Monday, Feb. 17, 6:30 p.m.

Discover how the Business Model Canvas can be used to develop your small business and learn how it helps you prepare your business plans. Registration required on the SCORE Princeton website. Newsroom 

Presented in partnership with SCORE Princeton.

 

Engaged Retirement: “Downsizing and Organizing”

Monday, Feb. 24, 7 p.m.

Professional organizer John Odalen shares easy techniques for getting and staying organized. New ways to think about possessions will be discussed along with options for disposing of items you no longer want or need. Odalen specializes in helping people who feel overwhelmed by their possessions and want to get organized, but don't know where to start. A longtime Lawrenceville resident, his first book on organizing is "Real Value: New Ways to Think About Your Time, Your Space & Your Stuff." Newsroom 

Presented in partnership with Princeton Senior Resource Center as part of the "Your Engaged Retirement" series.

 

Historical Fiction Book Group

The Historical Fiction Book Group features scholar-led book discussions about the fictional elements and nonfictional historic and regional context of selected books. Registration is requested but not required at the Historical Society of Princeton website.

 

Presented in partnership with the Historical Society of Princeton.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 12, 6:30 p.m.

Princeton University Associate Professor of History Beth Lew-Williams discusses "The Fortunes" by Peter Ho Davies. The book explores a century of American history through the lives of four Chinese Americans: a 19th-century laundry worker, a Chinese film star, a friend of someone killed in a hate crime and a half-Chinese man looking to adopt a Chinese baby.

 

Book Discussion: “This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism”

Thursday, Jan. 16, 10 a.m.

Nicole Maccarone of the Princeton Senior Resource Center leads a six-part discussion of  ”This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism" by Ashton Applewhite. The group will discuss a chapter or two each week. Registration is required. The series continues Jan. 23, Jan. 30, Feb. 6, Feb. 13 and Feb. 20. About the book (from the author's website): From childhood on, we’re barraged by messages that it’s sad to be old. That wrinkles are embarrassing, and old people useless. Author and activist Ashton Applewhite believed them too — until she realized where this prejudice comes from and the damage it does. Lively, funny, and deeply researched, "This Chair Rocks" traces Applewhite’s journey from apprehensive boomer to pro-aging radical, and, in the process, debunks myth after myth about late life. The book explains the roots of ageism — in history and in our own age denial — and how it divides and debases, examines how ageist myths and stereotypes cripple the way our brains and bodies function, looks at ageism in the workplace and the bedroom, exposes the cost of the all-American myth of independence, critiques the portrayal of oldsters as burdens to society, describes what an all-age-friendly world would look like, and concludes with a rousing call to action. Whether you’re older or hoping to get there, this book will shake you by the shoulders, cheer you up, make you mad, and change the way you see the rest of your life. Quiet Room 

 

Presented in partnership with Princeton Senior Resource Center.

 

Events

 

Meet the Mayor

Fridays, 8:30 a.m., Jan. 31, Feb. 28

Princeton residents are invited to discuss concerns with Mayor Liz Lempert in the library lobby through 10 a.m.

Presented in partnership with the Municipality of Princeton.

 

 

 

Jigsaw Puzzle Tournament

Sunday, Jan. 19, 1 p.m.

Teams of up to four players are invited to show off their jigsaw puzzle skills in the library's first jigsaw puzzle tournament. Each team will be assigned a table with a 1,000-piece puzzle to be opened when the tournament begins (puzzles will be from the same manufacturer). The first team to finish their puzzle wins; if no one finishes, the winning team will be the one with the fewest number of puzzle pieces left. Register your team, or register as an individual to be assigned to a team on the day of the event, through the events calendar. Community Room 

 

Drop in and Knit

Wednesdays  through Feb. 26, 10 a.m.

Bring your knitting or crochet project and join us for these drop-in sessions. Participants must provide their own supplies. Sessions will not include instruction. For more information about other knitting events, please visit https://princetonlibrary.org/knit-for-others/. Quiet Room 

 

 

Raconteur Radio presents “The Hobbit”

Monday, Jan. 27, 7 p.m.

Metuchen-based Raconteur Radio presents "The Hobbit," a staged radio play recreating J.R.R. Tolkien's famous story. The 55-minute production features theatrical lighting, period costumes, Golden Age radio equipment, sound effects and vintage commercials. Community Room 

 

AARP Tax Help

Mondays, Feb. 3 through April 13, by appointment

AARP tax volunteers will prepare and electronically file Federal and New Jersey individual, non-complex income tax returns for seniors and people of low to moderate income. Participants should bring a copy of their most recent return and documentation for the previous year’s income and expenses that may be deductible. Proof of identification is required. Help is available on Mondays, Feb. 3 through April 13, beginning at 8:45 a.m., by appointment only. Appointments may be scheduled through noon by calling (609) 924-9529, ext. 1220, beginning Jan. 2. Community Room 

Co-sponsored by the library and the AARP.

 

 

Princeton Sketchers

Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m., through Feb. 18

Sketchers of all abilities meet monthly on the first and third Tuesdays at the library before walking to a chosen location in town, on campus or somewhere indoors, to sketch for two hours or so. Everyone shares their drawings with the group at the end of the session. The meetups are a fun way to share or discover a love of drawing, turning a solitary activity into a group event where ideas and tips are shared and new friendships are formed. There are no rules; participants choose their own subjects and mediums. Beginners are welcome, but must be high-school-age or older. Conference Room 

 

 

Workshop: “A Few Kind Words”

Saturday, Jan. 11, 3 p.m.

Life coach Tracey Gates leads a workshop where participants will write a letter of appreciation and praise to a deserving person in their live. Letters will not be shared.  Conference Room 

 

Winter Craft: Create a Fascinator

Sunday, Jan. 12, 1 p.m.

Use our supplies and your creativity to create a fashionable fascinator that can be as demure or outlandish as you like. Following the craft, don your new fascinator and join us for tea as we watch the 2019 film, "Downton Abbey," at 3 p.m. in the Community Room. Space is limited, and registration is required. STEAM Studio 

 

Winter Craft: Card-Making Workshop for Adults

Sunday, Feb. 9, 2 p.m.

Linda Willimer leads a workshop where participants will learn techniques to create three unique greeting cards to give to someone they love on Valentine's Day or any day of the year. Registration is limited to 16 participants. STEAM Studio 

 

 

Teens

 

Code It- Level 1

Thursdays, 4 p.m., 16; Feb. 6, 20

Drop in for an hour to learn how to code in the programming language Python. In each session, a core concept will be covered along with an exercise to put newfound skills to the test. No previous coding experience necessary. Intended for grades 4 to 8. Sign up to receive class updates via the online events calendar. Co-presented by the library and Code Equal. Technology Center 

 

Code It – Level 2

Thursdays, 5 p.m., Jan. 16; Feb. 6, 20

In this series of advanced sessions, a core concept of Python programming will be covered along with an exercise to put newfound skills to the test. Intended for grades 4 to 8. Sign up to receive class updates via the online events calendar. Co-presented by the library and Code Equal. Technology Center 

 

Girl Code – Level 1

Thursdays, 4 p.m., Jan. 23; Feb. 13, 27

Girls in grades 4 to 8 are invited to drop in for an hour of an all-female coding class exploring the programming language Python. In this series for beginners, a core concept will be covered, along with an exercise to put new skills to the test. No coding experience necessary. Sign up to receive class updates via the online events calendar. Co-presented by the library and Code Equal. Technology Center 

 

Girl Code – Level 2

Thursdays, 5 p.m., Jan. 23; Feb. 13, 27

In this series of advanced sessions, girls in grades 4 to 8 are invited to drop in for an hour of an all-female coding class exploring the programming language Python. A core concept will be covered, along with an exercise to put new skills to the test. Sign up to receive class updates via the online events calendar. Co-presented by the library and Code Equal. Technology Center 

 

Go Between Club

Saturdays, 2 p.m., Jan. 11, Feb. 8

All sixth, seventh, and eighth graders are welcome to join us on the second Saturday of every month for a fun discussion of books and other interests. STEAM Studio 

 

TBD (To Be Discussed)

Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Jan. 28 and Feb. 25

All high school students are welcome to participate in this monthly discussion of great books, films, music, non-fiction, poetry, and all things cultural. Participants may also help create book displays and reading lists for the library, take group trips to see current films, and do group-reads. Story Room 

 

Math Circle for Middle Schoolers

Saturday, Feb. 15, 3 p.m.

Students in grades 6-8 engage in hands-on activities and solve puzzles designed by high school students at PRISMS. Important math concepts, including functions, geometry and combinatorics, will be explored. Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science. CoLab Space 

 

 

Preparing Students with Disabilities for Successful Transition to College

Wednesday, Jan. 15, 7 p.m.

Author and Columbia University learning consultant Elizabeth C. Hamblet explains how the system for accommodations works at college, describes students’ rights and responsibilities within that system, and shares what the research says are the skills and knowledge correlated with success at college. She also reviews the paperwork students need to apply for accommodations and discusses what accommodations may be available. Hamblet, a learning consultant working in Columbia University’s disability services office, has worked at the college level for nearly two decades. She speaks throughout the country on preparing students with disabilities for success at college and is the author of "From High School to College: Steps to Success for Students with Disabilities." Conference Room 

 

Chill Out

Friday, Jan. 31, 6 p.m.

 

Teens are invited to relax after midterms by spending some time reading, playing board games, crafting, knitting and swapping books with other teens while enjoying hot chocolate. Community Room 

 

 

Children and Families

 

 

Musical Tots Storytime

An event every week that begins at 10 am on Wednesday, Jan. 8, repeating until Feb. 12.

Children ages 18 months to 5 years are invited to experience music through books, movement, rhythm and improvisation. Explore and experience the piano each Wednesday with story time selections and introductory piano skills. Series is led by pianist and faculty member Kristin Cahill of the New School for Music Study. Story Room 

 

Stuffed Animal Sleepover

Saturday, Jan. 11, 4:30 p.m. 

Children ages 3 and older with an adult are invited to bring their favorite stuffed animal to a special story time after which they can leave their animals overnight at the library. Arrive 30 minutes early to register your stuffed animal. Animals, along with photographs showing what kind of fun they had and mischief they made in the library, can be picked up when the library opens at 1 p.m. on Sunday or any time the following week. Story Room 

 

Saturday Stories – Leap Day Storytime!

Saturday, Feb. 29, 10:30 a.m.

Leap into the library for a celebration of the day that only comes once every four years. There will be a story time full of hopping good stories and songs, followed by Leap Day activities and crafts. This program is for children ages 2-8 with an adult. Story Room 

 

Workshop with Illustrator/Author Chen Jiang-Hong

Tuesday, Jan. 14, 4 p.m.

Illustrator and author Chen Jiang-Hong leads a workshop featuring a craft/maker activity based on the technique of Chinese painting. Chen won the 2019 Prix Albertine Jeunesse for his book "The Tiger Prince," a tale about a tigress, a seer, a King, and the prince, who must leave his family and learn the ways of the tigers so that the war between humans and animals can end. A Chinese-born French painter, Chen has illustrated 22 books, 12 of which he also wrote. His work combines traditional Chinese techniques with a modern conception of storytelling. Book sale and signing to follow. For children 8 and older with an adult. Story Room 

 

Co-sponsored by the library and the jaZams and Cultural Services of the French Embassy.

 

 

 

Origami Club for all Ages

Wednesday, Jan. 8, 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 12, 6:30 p.m.

Anyone interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new, often seasonal, folding. Beginners are welcome. Adults must accompany children younger than 8. Quiet Room 

 

Chemistry Saturdays

Saturday, Jan. 18, 2 p.m.

Children in grades first through fifth grades are invited to join graduate students from the Princeton Chemistry Department in conducting fun and exciting chemistry experiments and hands-on science activities. Children 8 years old and younger must be accompanied by an adult. SEAM Studio

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton University Chemistry Department.

 

Science Circle

Saturday, Feb. 8, 3 p.m.

Budding scientists in third through sixth grades are invited to participate in hands-on science activities designed by high school students at PRISMS. Important concepts, focusing on a different scientific discipline each month, will be explored. Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science. CoLab Space 

 

Chess for Beginners

Thursday, Feb. 20, 4:30 p.m.

Children in kindergarten through third grade are invited to a drop-in workshop to learn the basics of chess in a fun, noncompetitive environment. Led by members of the Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science Chess Club. Co-presented by the Princeton Internationals School of Mathematics and Science. STEAM Studio 

1985) was an American mathematician renowned for her contributions to decision problems. CoLab Space 

 

 

Puzzle Palooza

Wednesday, Jan. 29, 10 a.m.

Celebrate National Puzzle Day on the third floor of the library where a variety of puzzles and riddles will be available for children and families through 6 p.m.

 

Chinese New Year Celebration

Saturday, Feb. 8, 1:30 p.m.

Celebrate Chinese New Year, the Year of the Rat, with Princeton High School's Mandarin classes and Chinese Club. Geared toward participants of all ages, the celebration features a traditional Chinese lion dance, Chinese painting, calligraphy, music and paper cutting. There will also be origami stations and martial arts performances. Community Room 

Presented in partnership with Princeton High School's Mandarin classes and Chinese Club.

 

Maker Mondays: Make a Snow Globe!

Monday, Feb. 10, 4 p.m.

Children in grades 1-5 will make a simple (no liquid) snow globe in this hands-on maker session. STEAM Studio 

 

This is Why We Heart You!

Friday, Feb. 14, 4:30 p.m.

Children are invited to show their family and friends how much they love them by crafting a valentine. Members of the library’s Teen Advisory Board will be on hand to help out and to inspire creativity. Story Room 

 

All Princeton Public Library programs are free and open to the public. If programs require registration, preference is given to library cardholders. The physically challenged should contact the library at (609) 924-9529 48 hours before any program with questions about special accommodations.

Opinions expressed during programming at Princeton Public Library do not necessarily reflect the views of the library, its staff, trustees or supporters.

The library is in the Sands Library Building at 65 Witherspoon St. in Princeton, NJ. Convenient parking is available on neighboring streets and in the borough-operated Spring Street Garage, which is adjacent to the library. For more information about library programs and services, call (609) 924-9529 or visit www.princetonlibrary.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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