Princeton Online: Princeton, New Jersey: Premier community information web site
Princeton New Jersey
http://www.stuartschool.org

church

church: First Presbyterian Church, Nassau Street

09/02/2005

Authors: The Historical Society of Princeton

Valid from 08/05/2009

organ

organ: Organ from First Presbyterian Church

09/02/2005

Authors: The Historical Society of Princeton

Valid from 08/05/2009

2012 Princeton Colloquium on Public and International Affairs April 13 & 14, 2012

04/10/2012

The 2012 Princeton Colloquium on Public and International Affairs will be held on Friday, April 13 and Saturday, April 14, 2012 in Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall on the Princeton University campus.  This year’s Colloquium, “The State of the States,” will explore ways that states can use policy levers to improve the health, education, and well-being of the United States populace.  Hosted by the Woodrow Wilson School, the Colloquium brings together policy-makers, academics, government officials, leaders of non-governmental institutions and foundations, and journalists who take a hard look at the levers that can be used to achieve stability and economic development around the world.

 

The opening keynote conversation will be held on Friday, April 13 at 8:30 p.m. and will feature Congressman Rush Holt (D-NJ), and Congressman Leonard Lance (R-NJ), MPA    ’82, discussing the state of the states from a federal perspective.

 

State policy making will be examined from four key angles on Saturday, April 14:  education, health, energy, and economic development.  These issues will be addressed through panel sessions, keynote addresses, and featured presentations.

 

Panel participants during the day on April 14 will include Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff ’85, Treasurer, State of New Jersey; Christopher Cerf, Acting Commissioner of Education in New Jersey; Gordon MacInnes, member Board of Governors of Rutgers, The State University; Christine Sturm, MPA-URP ’89, senior director of state policy, NJ Future; and Thomas Wright ’91, executive director, Regional Plan Association.  Many Wilson School alumni and faculty will also participate.

 

A detailed agenda of the sessions and panelist bios are available online at: http://www.princeton.edu/pcpia/index.xml.   The event will be archived online for later viewing on the Woodrow Wilson School’s Webmedia site  http://wws.princeton.edu/webmedia.


Valid from 04/10/2012 to 04/15/2012

NAMI Mercer Names County Executive Brian Hughes and Dr. Husseini Manji as Honorary Chairs of May 5 Walkathon

04/11/2012

 

 

County Executive Brian Hughes and renowned neuroscientist Dr. Husseini K. Manji will serve as honorary chairs of NAMI Mercer’s 5th annual walkathon – the NAMI Mercer WALK 2012. The WALK will be held at Educational Testing Services (ETS), located at 660 Rosedale Road, Princeton, New Jersey. The event will begin with registration at 8:30 a.m. The WALK will commence rain or shine at 10:00 a.m.

 

Hughes took office in November 2003, becoming the first Democrat to hold the post in 24 years. He was re-elected to a third term in November 2011. During his tenure, Hughes has championed several initiatives to improve health and safety.

Dr. Manji is Global Therapeutic Head for Neuroscience at Janssen Pharmaceutical Research & Development, LLC. Previously, he was chief, Laboratory of Molecular Pathophysiology and Experimental Therapeutics at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and director of the NIH Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program. 

Participants at the NAMI Mercer WALK will enjoy an on-site health and wellness expo, music, entertainment, food, and the company of more than 1,000 like-minded participants who share the mission of reducing the stigma so often associated with mental illness. The NAMI Mercer WALK is a unique opportunity to join together in strength, friendship and purpose to support an organization dedicated to individuals and families on their journey to wellness and recovery. The event raises the much needed funding to sustain the education, outreach and advocacy services that benefit those in greater Mercer County who face the challenges of mental illness every day.

For more information about the NAMI Mercer WALK 2012, please contact NAMI Mercer WALK 2012 Manager Jenn Antinoro by phone (609) 799-8994 X 17 or via email at jantinoro@namimercer.org. Information about the WALK, registration, team formation, volunteering, and sponsorship are available at

 

http://www.namimercer.org

Valid from 04/11/2012 to 05/06/2012

Emergency Services - Police, Fire, First Aid

09/21/2009

Both Borough and Township Police dispatch fire and ambulance vehicles. All officers are trained in emergency first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Fire and first aid equipment are standard in all patrol cars. For joggers, ID tags (Borough) and cards (Township) are available at the Police Departments. Bicycle registration is also offered by both departments.

BOROUGH POLICE

The Borough is served by a 32-member police force including a chief, a captain a lieutenant, 5 sergeants, 4 detectives and 20 uniformed patrol officers. There are 4 civilian dispatchers. The Police Department has a Crime Prevention Unit, which offers inspection and self-protection programs. The Department has 3 meter officers and 10 crossing guards. All members of the Department are appointed by the Mayor and Borough Council, following a qualifying examination. The Department's equipment includes 6 marked and 3 unmarked cars, 1 motorscooter, and a radio transmitter in operation 24 hours a day. The transmitter is used by the fire and engineering department as well as by the ambulance and rescue unit. Borough Police are in contact with the Statewide Radio Network and the Mercer County Crime Alert Network. Radar is used on Borough streets. The Breathalyzer and videotape unit are kept in Borough Hall, which also houses the 5-cell jail.

TOWNSHIP POLICE

The Township has 31 police officers, including a chief, 2 lieutenants, 5 sergeants, 4 detectives, and 18 uniformed patrol officers. Township police have a Crime Prevention Unit offering self-defense programs, free inspection of your premises and an engraver which can be borrowed to mark possessions. The Department also includes an Arson Unit, 15 crossing guards, and 4 civilian dispatchers. All members of the Department are appointed by the Mayor with approval of Township Committee, after a qualifying examination.

The Township has 6 marked and 6 unmarked cars, and a Small Animal Control Van. Radar is used in the Township and in addition to regular radio transmitters, the police monitor CB Channel 9. They are in contact with the Mercer County Crime Alert Network and the National Crime Information Center. There are 2 cells in the Township Hall jail.

UNIVERSITY PUBLIC SAFETY

A force of nineteen commissioned police officers and 33 security officers works closely with Borough and Township police. Members enforce University rules and regulations as well as work in conjunction with municipal officers to investigate infractions of the law.

FIRE DEPARTMENT

Fire protection in Princeton is provided by three volunteer fire companies. The companies are, with their dates of founding: The Princeton Hook and Ladder Fire Company (1788), located on Harrison Street North; Princeton Engine Company No. 1 (1794), located on Chestnut Street; and Fire Station 63: Mercer Engine Company No. 3 (1847), located on 353 Witherspoon Street in 1992.

Volunteer firefighters may be residents of the Borough, the Township or another municipality as long as they live within a twelve-mile radius of the Medical Center at Princeton. Volunteer firefighters must be at least 18 years of age. There is a junior firefighter program for 16- and 17-year-olds. Formal fire training schools are run once or twice a year. Members attend on their own time. Also, fire company drills are held frequently throughout the year.

The fire department equipment consists of seven fire trucks, including a Mack aerialscope with a boom capable of extending 75 feet.

There is no permanent staff at the firehouses. When an alarm is called in, either by telephone or from one of the telephone alarm call boxes, it goes directly to either the Borough or Township police headquarters, which alerts the Fire Department through the use of voice pagers. This allows firefighters to get a fire vehicle on the road quickly. In special emergencies the Fire Department goes to the aid of nearby districts. Conversely, if all the Princeton vehicles are in use, outside help from area fire departments is called in to staff the Princeton firehouses.

TO REPORT A FIRE

Princeton Borough:

9-1-1

Princeton Township:

9-1-1

If emergency calls are made to "Operator", the caller should be careful to state whether the fire broke out in the Borough or in the Township.

PRINCETON FIRST AID AND RESCUE SQUAD

The volunteer squad includes women, men, and cadets (ages 16-17). During the day, two municipally-funded, full-time Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) provide free professional emergency care within minutes. Each night volunteer crews sleep at the Squad House so they can respond promptly to any emergency. All Squad members are graduates of the state-certified Emergency Medical Technician training program. They must also take frequent refresher courses, attend at least six emergency drills annually, and serve on the night shift regularly.

All three ambulances housed at the building are fully equipped to handle any type of emergency in a prompt, reliable and efficient manner. Ambulance personnel can receive and carry out instructions from emergency room doctors while still at an accident scene. The Rescue 68 truck carries extrication equipment for auto accidents, ropes, scene lighting, compressed air, and also provides support to the Fire Department. The 4-wheel drive rescue vehicle can be used for backwoods rescue, as well as for transporting the rescue boat. In life-threatening situations such as heart attacks one of 3 lifemobiles available in Mercer County can be called in by the Squad.

Some of the squad members are also Red Cross instructors and help the Red Cross to provide first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to local citizens. Special demonstrations are also held for local schools, churches, and scout organizations. New volunteers are always welcome.

NOTE: To call an ambulance in an emergency, call 9-1-1

 


Valid from 09/22/2009 to 02/03/2013

First Things First!

09/21/2009

Authors: Pamela Caywood

Do you remember the old adage Better safe than sorry? It is a good one and when it comes to safety you need to be prepared. It would be a real shame during an emergency to say to yourself, "If only I had made time..." In the spirit of spring and starting out on the right foot, I am encouraging all parents and grandparents to take stock of their safety preparation. Listed below are some pointers that will help you on your way. As always when you are discussing safety issues, you will want to talk to your Doctor and receive their input. So, let's put first things first and make safety our priority of the week.

You should have a first aid kit in your home and you should also have one for travel. I keep my travel kit in my car so it is always with me. A lightweight money or tackle box with a childproof lock is great for your "on the go kit!" Listed below are some of the essentials you will want in your kit:

First Aid Book: There are many available. I would suggest, A Sigh of Relief by Martin I. Green.(Bantam Books, copyright 1995) This book will give you a complete list of first aid supplies while I will just list the most common ones.

First Aid Kit: You may want to purchase a prepared kit and then supplement with additional supplies. The kits come in all sizes. The small kit is perfect for travel and costs about $7.50.

Adhesive Strip Bandages: You will want to have these in a variety of sizes. For children, buy ones that are colorful and fun which makes the "hurt" go away much faster!

Gauze Pads: 2"x2" and 4"x4" will accommodate most wounds

Adhesive Tape: You will use this to secure gauze pads, splints etc.

Ice pack: Ready to use ice pack is perfect for travel and a colorful one that is always ready in the freezer works well at home. Boo-boo Elmo really helps calm the tears at my house.

Tweezers, needles and matches: These items will help you to remove a splinter. Use the matches to sterilize the needle.

Thermometer: This is especially helpful when you are traveling. Purchase one that you are comfortable using.

Syrup of Ipecac: Use after you consult your Doctor or local Poison Control Center for accidental ingestion of poison.

Tylenol/Motrin/Advil: Keep extra on hand for reducing a fever or relieving pain.

Expired Credit Card: great to scrape off stingers

Baking Soda/Meat Tenderizer: Make a paste with water to relieve pain from bee sting.

Anti-itch Cream Benadryl Hydrogen Peroxide Petroleum Jelly Saline Nose Drops Rubbing Alcohol Surgical Scissors Bulb Syringe Ace Bandage Calibrated teaspoon: to measure medicine Paper Cups Flashlight Tissues

Extras for travel:

Blanket/Towel


Paper and pen


Change for emergency phone call


Small bottles of water


Juice Boxes


Peanut butter crackers


My suggestion is that when you change your clocks in the spring and fall that you should also check the batteries in your smoke detectors and check your First Aid Kit. It is important to re-stock your supply and also to check the date on all of your supplies to make sure that they are still effective. Put a list of your first aid supplies in the kit so it is easy to determine what is missing.

Now, for more safety ideas:

1. Make several copies of important phone numbers (e.g. Doctor, Poison Control Center, Work Phone Numbers, Relatives) Put a copy by each phone, in each parent's wallet and in each first aid kit.

2. Always keep a recent photo of your child with you. On the back of the photo, you should write her age, height, weight, eye color, hair color and any distinguishing marks. In the unlikely event that your child is missing, you can quickly get people and police looking for the right child by showing her picture. If you have all of the pertinent information written down, it won't be a problem if you start to panic and cannot remember some particulars.

3. Finger printing and ID cards are becoming popular booths at Fairs. Next time you see a group offering this service, don't hesitate to have your child record this important information.

Well, those ideas should keep you busy. Please make time NOW to get your safety system in check! What a feeling you will have if you ever need something in an emergency and it is there!!


Valid from 09/22/2009 to 09/22/2009

Getting Ready for Camp - First Time Away From Home

04/01/2006

By Mark B. Levin, M.D. and Timothy J. Patrick-Miller, M.D.
The Pediatric Group, P.A., Princeton

 

 

 

This is the 59th article written in a series for Princeton Online

Separating from our child is one of the hardest things we parents have to do. We spend our time nurturing, teaching and protecting. Having to delegate that responsibility to someone else is always traumatic. But separate we must, both to give ourselves some space, but also to allow our child to develop independence and self-responsible behaviors. Camp affords opportunities for some activities not always available at home and gives us and our child a break from the daily routine of the balance of the year. Of course, we must select the appropriate age and developmental stage for our child. Some children are ready for overnight camp at a younger age than his/her peers.

Our first chore, after deciding that sleep-away camp is right for our child, is the selection of the camp. Camps come in a variety of flavors: arts and crafts, general sports, specific sports, performing arts, outdoor nature activities, boating and a little of everything. The best way to decide what type of camp to pick is to ask the child we s/he wants to do and to find out whether any of his/her friends are attending a specific camp. Keep in mind that the camp experience is for your child's enjoyment and learning, not for you to hone a particular skill in your child that you lack. The ultimate goal of a first camp experience is to foster independence and self-reliance. The more the child is involved in the selection process, the easier his/her adjustment will be.

Safety at camp is always a basic concern. Camps that are certified by a camp association (see http://camppage.com/other.html) usually have written policies and procedures in place that ensure safety. You should ascertain that the policies have been approved by a pediatrician or family practitioner with pediatric expertise. Your child should have had a complete physical examination during the year prior to attending camp. This is to assure that he has no physical or emotional issues that may impact his/her adjustment to and participation in camp activities. Fill out the camp application and health form honestly and accurately so that camp personnel have all the information needed to respond appropriately to your child's physical or emotional needs and to prevent any adverse events. He examination should include a review of the child's immunizations, in particular those for tetanus, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, pneumococcus, hemophilus influenza type b and meningococcus. Include on the emergency contact form your 24/7 contact information (cell phone or pager, as well as home and work phone numbers).

Once the preliminaries are done, you should turn your attention to preparing your child for the out-of-home experience. You can arrange sleep-overs at a friend's house (a misnomer because children rarely sleep during these get-togethers!) and family trips away from home, even for a weekend. Children typically experience home-sickness about two weeks after the start of camp. It lasts a few days and resolves as long as a child is comforted and reassured by the camp staff. The camp personnel must prevent teasing by a child's peers, which is likely to make a child more insecure and home sick.

Your drop-off procedure should also be designed to minimize any opportunity for long, drawn-out good-byes. Say "Good-bye" at home where your child feels secure. After that, take on the role of a livery driver. The drop-off should be short and sweet. At drop-off, try to connect your child with a friend going to the same camp or offer to take the friend with you to the drop-off. Expect a few tears (on your part, as well as on the part of your child), but do not let those tears change your separation plans. If things do not go as planned and you realize that your assessment of your child's readiness is inaccurate, you can always cancel the camp attendance. You may have to negotiate a fee refund.

Once the child departs for camp, be sure to write letters and/or email. The content of the communication should dwell on the goings-on at camp, rather than what is happening at home. Citing events that the child is missing may only enhance the likelihood of home-sickness. Packages of entertainment items and food are good to send, as long as they conform with the camp's policies. Camps generally frown upon packages containing items that may attract rodents and your child would be disappointed if he offending material was confiscated. While your child is away, you should start to think about what rules and customs at home may change as a result of the camp experience. If your child becomes more independent, you will not want to undermine this new achievement by continuing restrictions that were necessary for his/her previously less mature state.

As with written communication, when the time comes for visiting day, try to concentrate on camp activities rather than on what is happening at home. Let your child be the tour guide at camp, even if you are familiar with the topography. Remember that, for your child, the nooks and crannies at camp are new discoveries. Allowing him/her to demonstrate mastery of the terrain will be a positive step toward re-enrollment next year. Give your child a ten minute warning before you have to leave, then follow the brief good-bye procedure you used at the initial camp drop-off.

At the end of camp pick-up, be sure to be on time. Being left until last will surely make your child feel stranded and abandoned. Allow sufficient time for him/her to say "Good-bye" to his/her friends and exchange contact information. Once this is done, do not dally. Hop in the car and start the conversation with all the neat things that await your child on arrival home. Always try to talk about what the child will gain, not what s/he is losing. You can always debrief the summer activities once the readjustment to home has been successfully negotiated.

Good luck with the process and enjoy your summer!

 


Dr. Mark B. Levin

Dr. Levin was a member of the staff at The Pediatric Group starting in 1977. He was an attending Pediatrician at the Medical Center at Princeton, Chairman, Department of Pediatrics, Medical Center at Princeton, 1984 to 1986, 1989 to 1992, and past President, Medical and Dental Staff, Medical Center at Princeton, 1987 to 1988. Dr. Levin served on numerous Departmental and hospital committees. He published original articles both while at Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse and at The Pediatric Group.Dr. Patrick-Miller

 

Dr. Patrick-Miller has been a member of the staff at The Pediatric Group since 1985. Dr. Patrick-Miller has served on several Departmental and hospital committees. He has published original work while at The Pediatric Group. He and his wife enjoy travel. He also likes hiking, biking, gardening and reading.

Valid from 04/01/2006

Salt Creek Grille Introduces Dining Menus for Private Affairs

03/09/2010

Valid from 03/09/2010 to 07/09/2010

Pet CPR Classes and First Aid Demonstration March 21, 2010

03/18/2010

Pet CPR and First Aid is very important to all pet owners. Would you know what to do if your dog/cat stopped breathing or their heartbeat stopped? Did you know the Heimlich maneuver can be successfully be applied to pets who are choking? Acting quickly and calmly, within 5 to 7 seconds can save your pet’s life. Attend this essential demonstration for your pet’s well being and your peace of mind!  March 21, 11-3pm.

Beg n Bark
Brenda Janner
114 Bergen Ave.
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
908.359.0700
email: Brenda@begnbark.com

Valid from 03/18/2010 to 03/22/2010

Families in Transition to be Benefit of Community Christian Choir’s ‘Faith-Book’ At Robbinsville SDA Church

03/23/2010

Families in Transition, Inc. will be the special recipient of the benefit concert to be performed by the Community Christian Choir to be held on April 25th (6 pm) at Robbinsville Seventh Day Adventist Church, Route 33, Robbinsville.  Playing on the popular social network Facebook, the Community Christian Choir is beginning their new season with ‘Faith-book’, a combination of contemporary and traditional Christian musical pieces with themes based in scripture.

         The Community Christian Choir is a multi-denominational Christian choir that presents unique choral programs that please both the young and old. “Many children don’t know some of the old hymns that many of our adults have grown up with.  We wanted to share some of those beautiful songs with our children’s choir as well as the new music.” Said Pat Wietz, director of the both the adult Community Christian Choir and the Community Christian Children’s Choir. “These songs are beautiful and share such a special message.  We hope our audiences enjoy them as much as we do.”

         Every concert presented by the CCC is free of charge with a free will offering collected for a local charity.  Performing over 30 seasons, the CCC has raised over $140,000 for local charities; such as HomeFront, TASK, Carmel Guild and many others.  This is the fourth time that the choir has held a concert to benefit Families In Transition.

         Families In Transition, Inc. is a Mercer County transitional housing program which helps families with children work from homelessness into self sufficiency. For more information, write to www.familiesintransition@comcast.net.

         To learn more about this concert season and other information about the choir and future concerts, please contact Pat Weitz at (609)587-7076 or by checking their website at CCChoir.com.

  

 

Valid from 03/23/2010 to 04/26/2010

ArtFirst Exhibit of Artists with Disabilities Opens April 17 at University Medical Center of Princeton

04/09/2010

On Saturday, April 17, from 6 – 9 p.m., ArtFirst!, an international juried exhibition and sale of original art work by professional artists with disabilities, kicks off with a Patron’s Preview Party. The exhibit, sponsored by the Auxiliary of University Medical Center at Princeton (UMCP).The exhibit continues through June 12. After the Preview Party, the exhibit will be free and open to the public from 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. daily. ArtFirst! showcases the unlimited creative talent of artists with disabilities and provides a venue for them to display their work and earn income while furthering the Auxiliary’s mission of strengthening the relationship between UMCP and the communities it serves. Guests attending the Patron’s Preview Party will enjoy a festive evening of art, music, delicious food and cocktails, and will be offered the opportunity to purchase art before it is released for sale to the public.

The 2010 exhibit will feature more than 200 paintings, sculptures, jewelry, photography, fabric art, glasswork, metalwork, and other fine crafts.  Prizes in eight categories, ranging from $50.00 – $500.00 will be awarded by a panel of three jurors; this year’s jurors include Eric Pryor, Director of the NJ State Museum, Jamie Greenfield, artist and art instructor at the Lawrenceville School, and Harry Naar, Director of the Rider University Art Gallery.

 
Local artists of interest include:

 
Karen Baczewski, Robbinsville, Oil Painting: A former student of Mel Leipzig, who inspired her to keep pursing art in spite of her rheumatoid arthritis.  To do so, she has developed unique methods that help her handle her brushes.

 
Joyce Collura, Jamesburg, Pen and Ink: Intricate, flowing depictions of fauna and flora.

 
Leigha Emma Cohen, Lawrenceville, Photography: Crisp, vibrant images of regional scenes.

 
Another interesting story:

 
Sukla Brothers (Siddhartha & Sriharsha): Cuttack, Orissa, India, Collagists: Longtime participants in ArtFirst, they are both hearing impaired artists who produce beautifully detailed collages that are delicate, yet resonate with energy.

 

To purchase tickets for ArtFirst! Patron’s Preview Party at the University Medical Center at Princeton on April 17, please visit: www.princetonhcs.org/ArtFirst.  Tickets cost $75.00 and proceeds from the event will be used to commission artwork for the public areas of the new University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro (UMCPP).  The University Medical Center at Princeton is located at 253 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ. Parking is available in the adjacent garage as well as metered parking along Franklin Ave.

 
The Auxiliary of University Medical Center at Princeton is a dynamic volunteer organization that raises funds for the hospital through a variety of events and programs. UMCP, a unit of Princeton HealthCare System, is an acute-care, teaching hospital that was recently named – for the second consecutive year -- as one of only 37 Top Hospitals in the United States for patient safety, clinical outcomes and efficiency by the prestigious Leapfrog Group.  It is a University Hospital affiliate of UMDNJ - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. It has served people in central NJ since 1919.
 

Valid from 04/09/2010 to 06/13/2010

D&R Greenway Land Trust Announces the First Exhibition of Waterbirds, by Theodore L. Cross of Princeton and Sanibel Island.

04/09/2010

 D&R Greenway Land Trust announces the first
exhibition of images from Waterbirds, the dazzling fine art book written and
photographed by Theodore L. Cross of Princeton and Sanibel Island.
Twenty-three images of New Jersey waterbirds in dramatic poses were
personally selected by Mr. Cross,  immediately before his unexpected
passing.  Mr. Cross's widow, Mary, and family, chose go forward with this
exhibit in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries through April 30, as tribute to
this dedicated conservationist and gifted writer and artist.  Copies of
Waterbirds will be sold throughout the exhibition, a percentage of the
proceeds to support D&R Greenway's land preservation and stewardship
mission. 

Each oversized photograph on D&R Greenway's restored barn walls is captioned
with text from Waterbirds, --Mr. Cross's eloquent observations about each
species in the setting where he encountered it.  The panels also include
site information on where to view these birds in New Jersey.  Many of Mr.
Cross's chosen species migrate through and / or nest on properties preserved
by the land trust.  This art is available for viewing on business hours of
business days at D&R Greenway's Johnson Education Center.  [One Preservation
Place, Princeton, 08540, --off Rosedale Road.  Call 609-924-4646 to be sure
galleries are free that day.  www.drgreenway.org

In 2004, Mr. Cross launched Birders United, whose mission is to alert the
public in general and politicians in particular to the urgency of preserving
and expanding lands crucial to birds in migration and breeding.  In founding
Birders United [ http://www.birdersunited.com/ ], Mr. Cross insisted that
"preserving the lands where these birds are found is one of the most
important legacies we can leave to future generations."  Birders United
moves inexorably forward, "recommend[ing] initiatives that strengthen and
enlarge the habitats of birds and increase protections for species that are
most vulnerable."

Many birds comprising Theodore Cross's radiant exhibition may be found
nearby in the Hamilton / Trenton / Bordentown Marsh, a tidal oasis in New
Jersey's urban landscape.  D&R Greenway leads a coalition of public and
private partners, establishing and implementing cooperative stewardship for
this freshwater wetland, since 1996.  The Marsh supports 237 species of
birds in breeding and migration, many threatened and endangered. 

Mannington Meadows, [Salem County, Delaware Bay, South Jersey], --an
18,593-acre agrarian and tidal estuarine area--, has been designated an
Important Bird Area [IBA] by New Jersey Audubon Society. D&R Greenway was
requested to lead the preservation of 2,250 acres of farmland bordering and
buffering this critical bird habitat, with the intent of creating a
permanent Green Belt surrounding Mannington Meadows.

In a December NPR interview, Theodore Cross revealed, "Except for my family
and friends, there are few things I care about [as I care for these birds.]"

Valid from 04/09/2010 to 05/01/2010

San Lucas Mission in Guatemala Will Benefit From Community Christian Choir’s ‘Faith-Book’ At St. Anthony of Padua RC Church

04/14/2010

San Lucas Mission in Guatemala will be the special recipient of the benefit concert to be performed by the Community Christian Choir to be held on May 7th (7:30 pm) at St. Anthony of Padua Roman Catholic Church, 251 Franklin St., Hightstown.  Playing on the popular social network Facebook, the Community Christian Choir is beginning their new season with ‘Faith-book’, a combination of contemporary and traditional Christian musical pieces with themes based in scripture.

         The Community Christian Choir is a multi-denominational Christian choir that presents unique choral programs that please both the young and old. “Many children don’t know some of the old hymns that many of our adults have grown up with.  We wanted to share some of those beautiful songs with our children’s choir as well as the new music.” Said Pat Wietz, director of the both the adult Community Christian Choir and the Community Christian Children’s Choir. “These songs are beautiful and share such a special message.  We hope our audiences enjoy them as much as we do.”

         Every concert presented by the CCC is free of charge with a free will offering collected for a local charity.  Performing over 30 seasons, the CCC has raised over $140,000 for local charities; such as HomeFront, TASK, Carmel Guild and many others. 

         San Lucas Mission is located in San Lucas Toliman, Guatemala and has served the community for 60 years.  This mission supports the entire San Lucas region by helping organize and fund a coffee cooperative, a clinic/health care center, a women’s center, a school, educational scholarships, housing/construction and disaster relief.  The projects are all sustainably organized by the Guatemalans themselves.

         To learn more about this concert season and other information about the choir and future concerts, please contact Pat Weitz at (609)587-7076 or by checking their website at www.CCChoir.com.

   

 

Valid from 04/14/2010 to 05/08/2010

Getting Ready for Camp: Getting Ready for Camp - First Time Away From Home

04/19/2006

Authors: Mark B. Levin, M.D. and Timothy J. Patrick-Miller, M.D.
The Pediatric Group

Separating from our child is one of the hardest things we parents have to do. We spend our time nurturing, teaching and protecting. Having to delegate that responsibility to someone else is always traumatic. But separate we must, both to give ourselves some space, but also to allow our child to develop independence and self-responsible behaviors. Camp affords opportunities for some activities not always available at home and gives us and our child a break from the daily routine of the balance of the year. Of course, we must select the appropriate age and developmental stage for our child. Some children are ready for overnight camp at a younger age than his/her peers.

Our first chore, after deciding that sleep-away camp is right for our child, is the selection of the camp. Camps come in a variety of flavors: arts and crafts, general sports, specific sports, performing arts, outdoor nature activities, boating and a little of everything. The best way to decide what type of camp to pick is to ask the child we s/he wants to do and to find out whether any of his/her friends are attending a specific camp. Keep in mind that the camp experience is for your child's enjoyment and learning, not for you to hone a particular skill in your child that you lack. The ultimate goal of a first camp experience is to foster independence and self-reliance. The more the child is involved in the selection process, the easier his/her adjustment will be.

Safety at camp is always a basic concern. Camps that are certified by a camp association (see http://camppage.com/other.html) usually have written policies and procedures in place that ensure safety. You should ascertain that the policies have been approved by a pediatrician or family practitioner with pediatric expertise. Your child should have had a complete physical examination during the year prior to attending camp. This is to assure that he has no physical or emotional issues that may impact his/her adjustment to and participation in camp activities. Fill out the camp application and health form honestly and accurately so that camp personnel have all the information needed to respond appropriately to your child's physical or emotional needs and to prevent any adverse events. He examination should include a review of the child's immunizations, in particular those for tetanus, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, pneumococcus, hemophilus influenza type b and meningococcus. Include on the emergency contact form your 24/7 contact information (cell phone or pager, as well as home and work phone numbers).

Once the preliminaries are done, you should turn your attention to preparing your child for the out-of-home experience. You can arrange sleep-overs at a friend's house (a misnomer because children rarely sleep during these get-togethers!) and family trips away from home, even for a weekend. Children typically experience home-sickness about two weeks after the start of camp. It lasts a few days and resolves as long as a child is comforted and reassured by the camp staff. The camp personnel must prevent teasing by a child's peers, which is likely to make a child more insecure and home sick.

Your drop-off procedure should also be designed to minimize any opportunity for long, drawn-out good-byes. Say "Good-bye" at home where your child feels secure. After that, take on the role of a livery driver. The drop-off should be short and sweet. At drop-off, try to connect your child with a friend going to the same camp or offer to take the friend with you to the drop-off. Expect a few tears (on your part, as well as on the part of your child), but do not let those tears change your separation plans. If things do not go as planned and you realize that your assessment of your child's readiness is inaccurate, you can always cancel the camp attendance. You may have to negotiate a fee refund.

Once the child departs for camp, be sure to write letters and/or email. The content of the communication should dwell on the goings-on at camp, rather than what is happening at home. Citing events that the child is missing may only enhance the likelihood of home-sickness. Packages of entertainment items and food are good to send, as long as they conform with the camp's policies. Camps generally frown upon packages containing items that may attract rodents and your child would be disappointed if he offending material was confiscated. While your child is away, you should start to think about what rules and customs at home may change as a result of the camp experience. If your child becomes more independent, you will not want to undermine this new achievement by continuing restrictions that were necessary for his/her previously less mature state.

As with written communication, when the time comes for visiting day, try to concentrate on camp activities rather than on what is happening at home. Let your child be the tour guide at camp, even if you are familiar with the topography. Remember that, for your child, the nooks and crannies at camp are new discoveries. Allowing him/her to demonstrate mastery of the terrain will be a positive step toward re-enrollment next year. Give your child a ten minute warning before you have to leave, then follow the brief good-bye procedure you used at the initial camp drop-off.

At the end of camp pick-up, be sure to be on time. Being left until last will surely make your child feel stranded and abandoned. Allow sufficient time for him/her to say "Good-bye" to his/her friends and exchange contact information. Once this is done, do not dally. Hop in the car and start the conversation with all the neat things that await your child on arrival home. Always try to talk about what the child will gain, not what s/he is losing. You can always debrief the summer activities once the readjustment to home has been successfully negotiated.

Good luck with the process and enjoy your summer!

Call For Vendors for Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad's Fall Flea Market

08/13/2010

Call for vendors for Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad's fall flea
market on September 18, 9am-1pm. Tables $15/ea. Tables provided.
Please call 609-921-6320 or 921-8972 to reserve.

Valid from 08/13/2010 to 09/19/2010

 CHADD AD/ADHD INFORMATION & SERVICES FAIR September 25, 2010

08/20/2010

 CHADD ADHD INFORMATION & SERVICES FAIR
    Saturday, September 25th  12 PM - 4 PM
   John Witherspoon Middle School, Princeton
                      Free Admission


Keynote Speakers:
12:00PM  Dorothy Mullen, founder of the Suppers Program, “How You Feel is Data: An Experiential Workshop with Food”
3:30 PM  Dr. Jennifer Nasser, researcher in the field of nutrition, from Drexel University, will be discussing ADHD brain chemistry and nutrition from the viewpoint of the latest scientific  research.


Demonstrations through out the event.


Exhibitors Include Nutritionists,  Nutritionists, Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Pediatricians, Social Skills Providers, Speech Therapists, Occupational Therapists, ADHD Coaches, Recreation Providers, Schools, Lawyers, Advocates, and Regional Support services for all ages.


The fair will be an valuable resource to parent, adults, and professionals to looking for resources and contacts. 
All welcome to attend. 


If you have any questions or would like to become an exhibitor please email CHADDFAIR@aol.com  
For more information about our Princeton Chapter please visit our website www.chadd.net/template.cfm?affid=153&p=about or call 609 683 8787



 

Valid from 08/25/2010 to 09/26/2010

Visual Arts Center of New Jersey Appoints First Curator

09/23/2010

Summit, NJ September 23, 2010:  The Visual Arts Center of New Jersey announced today the
appointment of Mary Birmingham as the Art Center’s first professional staff Curator.  Ms.
Birmingham, a noted art historian and scholar, will begin her tenure at the Art Center on
November 1, 2010.
 
Well-known throughout the region for organizing solo and group exhibitions of contemporary art,
Ms. Birmingham began her career as a cataloguer at the Whitney Museum and for nine years
was a member of the curatorial staff of the Montclair Art Museum.  She holds degrees in Art
History from Seton Hall University and Hunter College. 
 
Marion Grzesiak, the Art Center’s Executive Director, commented, “Mary’s reputation, expertise
and distinctive point-of-view are a wonderful addition to the Art Center, especially as we begin to
organize a new season of exhibitions. Her background as an educator is invaluable as we
deepen our commitment to providing arts education to school districts that have lost funding.”
 
Ms. Birmingham added, “I’m very excited to join the Art Center; it’s such a beloved community
resource that brings education and exhibitions to a remarkably large and diverse audience.  I’m
looking forward to developing an exhibition program that will not only showcase talented artists,
but also position the Art Center as a major destination for contemporary art exhibitions.”   
 
Ms. Birmingham currently serves as Director of Exhibitions at the Hunterdon Art Museum,
Clinton, overseeing an ambitious contemporary art program comprising more than ten group
and solo exhibitions per year.  She also writes and lectures on American and contemporary art,
and has taught art history at Montclair State University and Kean University. 
 
Founded in 1933, the Visual Arts Center of New Jersey is the state’s largest organization
dedicated exclusively to viewing, making and learning about contemporary art. Comprising a
renowned studio school and a thriving exhibition, education and programming schedule, the Art
Center welcomes over 60,000 visitors each year. 
 
The Visual Arts Center of New Jersey is located at 68 Elm Street, Summit, NJ.  The Art Center
will present Cut, Weld, and Build: Process in Works by Chakaia Booker, showcasing the work of
the noted contemporary artist and New Jersey native.  The exhibition is on view in the galleries
from October 1 through December 3, 2010; outdoor works will remain on view through August
2011.  
 
Gallery hours are Monday – Thursday 9:30am – 8pm, Friday 9:30am – 5pm, and Saturday &
Sunday 10am – 4pm. 
 

Valid from 09/23/2010 to 11/23/2010

Witherspoon Grill's First Annual Harvest & Music Festival

10/05/2009

Harvest & Music Festival - October 11th (benefiting T.A.S.K.) 12-5pm

Celebrate fall during Witherspoon Grill’s first annual “Harvest & Music Festival” presented on Sunday, October 11th from 12 noon to 5pm at Witherspoon Plaza (adjacent to the Princeton Public Library on Witherspoon Street).   This family-friendly outdoor event (rain or shine) will feature live music, kid’s activities and great food and spirits.
 
The festivities kick-off with live performances, which continue throughout the day:
 
12:00 pm - The Highland Park Quartet
1:15 pm - The Carole Lynne Quartet
2:30 pm - Matt Richards (guitar soloist)
4:00 pm - The 6th Street Quarternion
 
Relax and enjoy the music along with a delicious array of foods available for purchase from Witherspoon Grill, Blue Point Grill, Nassau Street Seafood & Produce Company and Sweet Mama’s, along with freshly-baked harvest pies from JM Group.   Kids can enjoy pumpkin painting, apple decorating, face painting, contests and more.   Entrance is free, and a portion of all proceeds from food and activity sales will benefit the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen (T.A.S.K.).
 
“We wanted to bring a fun celebration of the fall harvest season to the town, while at the same time using the event to give back to the community by  collecting donations and raising funds for those in need, especially given the hardships that so many are facing this year,”  said Jack Morrison, President of JM Group.
 
Donations to T.A.S.K. will be collected during the Harvest & Music Festival.   In addition, all JM Group businesses (Witherspoon Grill, Blue Point Grill and Nassau Street Seafood & Produce Company) will collect donations beginning September 16th up to and including the festival day.
 
T.A.S.K. is in need of the following non-perishable items (no glass, please):  powdered milk, canned green beans, corn  and mixed vegetables, spaghetti sauce, canned fruit, canned chicken or beef gravy, salad dressing, rice, spaghetti, elbow macaroni, vegetarian beans), individual servings of Jello or pudding that do not require refrigeration, juice boxes.   Hygiene items including toothpaste, toothbrushes, deodorant, razors, shampoo and hand/body lotion are also appreciated.
 

Valid from 10/04/2009 to 10/12/2009

Boned Shad - First of the Season at Nassau Street Seafood

02/05/2015

Fish of the Week at Nassau Street Seafood

Boned Shad - First of the Season at 

 
Shad is an American saltwater fish, a type of herring that spawns in fresh water at the start of spring. The American shad, a boney fish that is typically three to five pounds each, is prized not for its flesh but for its eggs, a delicacy known as Shad Roe.


A short season for this popular delicacy... Call in your order at 609.921.0620 or stop in to pick up while supplies last !!!

 

Check out daily specials and our menu at http://nassaustreetseafood.com

 

Valid from 02/05/2015 to 02/13/2015

Princeton Regional Chamber Slates Its First Business After Business Reception of the Year at Salt Creek Grille

01/14/2010

The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a Networking Reception hosted by Salt Creek Grille on Thursday, January 28th 2010, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.   Cost to attend is $25 for Chamber members and $30 for non-members.  Guests are requested to register in advance at www.princetonchamber.org or call (609) 924-1776. 

The business community is invited to join Chamber Members to enjoy a relaxed, yet sophisticated networking experience while enjoying the unique and traditional "craftsman" style architecture that Salt Creek Grille offers. Sample the delicious food and refreshing libations that Salt Creek Grille is famous for and be sure to bring plenty of business cards to distribute at the Chamber's first Business after Business Reception of the New Year. Salt Creek Grille is located at Princeton Forrestal Village along U.S. Route 1 next to the Westin Princeton Hotel. For directions, visit www.saltcreekgrille.com
 

Valid from 01/14/2010 to 01/29/2010

Mercer County Connection Answers Consumer Affairs Question June 8 & 25, 2010

06/02/2010

CONSUMER AFFAIRS – Monday, June 8th and Friday, June 25rd from 11a.m. – 3 p.m.
Experiencing difficulty with a local business? Do you need information on how to avoid Credit, Home
Improvement, Automotive, or Internet Fraud?  A representative from the Mercer County Consumer Affairs
Commission will be at the Mercer County Connection to answer your questions.
 

Mercer County Connection
957 Highway 33
Hamilton, NJ  08690
Phone 609-890-9800
Fax 609-890-9861
 

Valid from 06/02/2010 to 06/26/2010

New Jersey 2010 Agricultural Fairs

06/15/2010


MERCER COUNTY 4-H FAIR
92nd Annual
August 1-2

10:00am-8:00pm Saturday
10:00am-4:00pm Sunday

Howell Living History Farm
For directions, see http://www.howellfarm.org/
(the farm is located 2 miles east on Valley Road, off Rt.July 31 - August 1
10:00 am – 8:00 pm on Saturday
10:00 am – 4:00 pm on Sunday

    Free Admission. Free Parking

Join us for the fair’s third year at Howell Living History Farm. 
The fair includes 4-H animal shows and exhibits; food and homemade ice cream;  hay rides; pony rides; music; farm tours and demos; cow milking demos; spinning, felting and fiber demos; egg grading demos; children’s crafts and activities; and displays by the Master Gardeners of Mercer County and
the Mercer County Equestrian Center. 

For information contact: Kate Everett at the Mercer County 4H Office
(609) 989-6833.


MIDDLESEX COUNTY FAIR

August 2-3-4-5-6-7-8

    655 Cranbury Rd., Rt. 535, East Brunswick
Admission: $6.00 Adults; Senior Citizens 65 & over $4; $1.00 Children 12 – 3; Under 2 Free. 
Free Parking.

Hours:    Mon - Fri          5 pm - 11 pm
              Saturday          11 am - 11 pm
             Sunday          11 am - 7 pm

Fireworks, Monday night; Pony Rides, Home & Garden Exhibits, 4-H & Animal Displays, Food Vendors, Crafts Demonstrations, Agriculture Displays & Free Entertainment & Attractions Daily
.
  Rides by Skelly’s Amusements (Monday & Wednesday unlimited rides - $20.00 starting at 5:00
10:00 pm; Saturday and Sunday – 11 am – 4 pm)

Mailing Address: PO Box 400, Milltown, NJ 08850
Phone: (732) 257-8858 or 732-416-1929
www.MiddlesexCountyFair.org


MONMOUTH COUNTY FAIR

50th Anniversary
July 21-22-23-24-25

East Freehold Park & Show Grounds, Kozloski Rd., Freehold Township

Admission $6.00. Children 12  and Under Free.
Free Parking.

Hours:    7/21 - 23    5 pm - 11 pm
                7/24           11 am - 11 pm
               7/25          11 am - 6 pm

Free Entertainment, Stage Shows, 4-H Shows & Exhibit, Horse Show, Pig Races, The Bwana Jim Reptile Show, Fireworks, Demonstrations  & Competitions, Antique Cars, large midway, variety of food/snack vendors, two Circus nights, movie nights, Lumberjack shows and more.

Fair Chair: Rick Royle, 805 Newman Springs Road, Lincroft, New Jersey 07738
(732) 842-4000 X4349 (NOTE: This number cannot accept a high volume of calls). 
Please use the General phone number for all publications (732) 842-4000

MORRIS COUNTY 4-H FAIR

July 23-24- 25

    Chubb Park, Route 24, Chester
Free Admission - $5.00 parking donation
Hours:    7/23 - 24    9:30 am – 9:30 pm    
7/25
9:30 am – 4:00 pm

4-H Exhibits, Entertainment, Pony Rides, Dog Show, Talent Show, Children’s Pet Show, Dress-A-Pet & Dress-A-Cage Contest.  Hay Rides, 4-H Dog Show, Small Animal Show, Seeing Eye Puppy Demo, Petting Barn, Karate Demo, Chicken Bar-B-Que. 

Manager: Kathy Murarik,
RCE of Morris County, 4-H Department, PO Box 900, Morristown, NJ 07963-0900
Phone: (973) 285-8301 EXT. 3 
E-mail: murarik@aesop.rutgers.edu


NEW JERSEY STATE FAIR
SUSSEX COUNTY FARM & HORSE SHOW

August 6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15

    37 Plains Road, Augusta (Off Route 206)

Where Farm Meets Fun! New Jersey’s Largest Agricultural Fair! A 10 day event in the Sussex Skylands in Northwest, NJ. The fair features agricultural events and education exhibits, livestock, horse show, carnival, petting zoo, vendors, crafts, flower & vegetable shows, art & photography exhibits, 4-H, chainsaw artist and auction, fair food, free entertainment, and MUCH MORE!!! .

Admission:  Adults - $11
Children (6-12) - $5
              Children (5 and under) – Free

       Free Parking

Visit our website for admission and ride specials!
PO Box 2456, Branchville, NJ 07826 
Phone: (973) 948-5500 Fax: (973)948-0147
E-Mail: thefair@njstatefair.org
Website: http://www.newjerseystatefair.org
 


OCEAN COUNTY FAIR

July 13-14-15-16-17-18

Robert J. Miller Airport, Rt. 530, Berkeley Twp.

Admission Charged. Children under 10 free. 
Free Parking
.
Continuous Entertainment, 4-H, Petting Barn, Carnival, Exhibits, Children Games, Competitions.

Hours:    7/13 – 14          5 pm - 11 pm
               7/15 - 17           11 am - 11 pm
               7/18                  11 am - 5 pm 

Manager: O. Jackson Meyer; Concession Manager:
Kitty Meyer, Agricultural Center, 1623 Whitesville Rd., Toms  River,  
NJ  08755  Phone: (732) 914-9466
Fax (732) 914-0591
E-mail: ocfair@usa.com
Website: www.oceancountyfair.com   


SALEM COUNTY FAIR

August 3-4-5-6

    Salem County Fairgrounds, Route 40, Woodstown
Free Admission. Parking Fee.

Pig races every evening, Cattle Sorting (Thursday), Ladies Skillet Throw & Children’s Pedal  Pull nightly. Musical Entertainment Tues-Wed-Thurs, BBQ (Wed & Thurs & Fri).
  
Secretary: Mrs. Dorothy Quirk, 463 Auburn Road, Pilesgrove, NJ 08098
Phone: (856) 769-3494
Fair Phone: (856) 769-0414 
Secretary’s E-mail:  quirk463@comcast.net
President: Alexis Coleman, Phone: 856-358-2213



SOMERSET COUNTY 4-H FAIR
August 11-12-13

10 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
4-H Fairgrounds at North Branch Park
 Milltown Rd., Bridgewater between Routes 202 & 22,
West of Somerville in Bridgewater Township
Free Family Fun. Free Entertainment All Day.
Free Parking

Free shuttle bus transportation all day from Raritan Valley Community College, Rt. 28, No. Branch
.
Horse, Dog, Beef, Dairy, Sheep, Goat, Alpaca Shows. Poultry, Rabbits, Herpetology
Go-Karts, Model Trains, Model Planes, RC Cars, Rocket launches Arts Tent, Science Tent, Hands on activities for kids in twelve (12) 4-H tents.  Food supplied by twenty (20) community organizations.

  No selling in Commercial Exhibitors tent Exhibits, activities and info in County Government Tent. 

Contact: Barbara Navatto, 4-H Program Coordinator 
310 Milltown Rd., Bridgewater, NJ 08807
Phone: (908) 526-6644
Website:
www.4HisTops.org



WARREN COUNTY FARMERS’ FAIR

August 1-2-3-4-5-6-7

Agricultural fun for the whole family
Three miles north of Phillipsburg on Co. Rt 519
Ride Specials - TBA

Admission -l Monday thru Friday 10 am –4 pm only: Adults $5.00  Youth 12 and under FREE

Admission After 4 p.m. & all day Saturday & Sunday- Adults $5.00 – Youth 5 – 12 $3.00
4 and under FREE  

Open English, Western & Speed Horse Show – August 1 –
Warren County Nine Pines Open English, Western Horse Show- August 7

For more information on fair events, tickets, contact:
WC Farmers’ Fair, 165 Co. Rt 519 So., Belvidere NJ  07823 
(908) 859-6563;

 For vendor information , contact Mary Beth at
(908) 459-4360

Website: www.warrencountyfarmersfair.org

Valid from 06/15/2010 to 08/08/2010

Human Medtonome - For Richie Havens, rock 'n' roll was the first generational primal scream

08/02/2006

Authors: Anthony Stoeckert

The Princeton Packet

Richie Havens has been playing music every weekend for 29 years. Before that, he played five or six days a week. He opened at Woodstock, which helped make his career almost 30 years ago. Richie will be playing at the Eagle Theatre in New Hope, Pa on August 5th.

Morven Museum & Garden Announces Gallery Tour and Lecture “The View from the White House: the First Lady, 1920-2010” Tuesday, September 28, at 7:00 pm

09/15/2010

Morven Museum & Garden is holding a gallery tour and lecture called “The View from the White House: the First Lady, 1920-2010” Tuesday, September 28, at 7:00 pm by Dr. Myra Gutin, professor of Communications and Journalism at Rider University, who has written extensively about America's first ladies, and teaches a course titled “The American First Lady in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries.”  The lecture looks at the first ladies from 1920 up to Michelle Obama and divides them into three classifications: Ceremonial Presences, the Emerging Spokeswomen and the Activist. The lecture is a part of the museum’s major exhibition, The Kennedys | Portrait of a Family: Photographs by Richard Avedon, which runs now to October 31, 2010.

Dr. Gutin is the author of The President’s Partner: The First Lady in the Twentieth Century, and Barbara Bush: Presidential Matriarch, and she is widely quoted in national and international news media on the topic of first ladies. She contributed two articles to Report to the First Lady, 2009, a study of the history and Office of the First Lady, which was presented to Michelle Obama.  She received B.A. and M.A. degrees in communications from Emerson College, Boston, MA, where she was the recipient of Emerson College’s Distinguished Alumni Award, and a Ph.D degree in communications from the University of Michigan.

Morven Museum & Garden is located at 55 Stockton Street in Princeton. Advance reservations are required. Tickets are $10 for members and $15 for non-members, and can be purchased by calling Morven at (609) 924-8144, ext. 106. The museum offers free, on-site parking.

Valid from 09/15/2010 to 09/29/2010

Princeton Center for Plastic Surgery & Medispa is One of the First Facilities in the United States to Offer New Body Shaping Technology from Europe.

09/20/2010

Princeton Center for Plastic Surgery & Medispa
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  
Thomas A. Leach, M.D.
609-921-7161
www.princetonsurgery.com
 
 
 
Thomas A. Leach, M.D.  Introduces New Lipotherme™ Treatment


Princeton Center for Plastic Surgery & Medispa in Princeton, N.J.  is chosen as one of
the first facilities in the United States to offer new body shaping technology from Europe.
 
 The Princeton Center for Plastic Surgery & Medispa, is one of the pioneers in the
rapidly growing field of aesthetic medicine, today announced the availability of
Lipotherme™, an FDA-approved body shaping treatment for the removal of unwanted
fat.
 
Lipotherme™ Procedure
 
Even with dieting and exercise, many people are seeking ways to quickly and
effectively remove stubborn areas of unwanted fat. Lipotherme, the latest
technology to hit our shores, quickly and safely removes problem areas of fat
deposits, and is now being offered by Thomas A. Leach, M.D.   Lipotherme
uses thermal energy in the form of a heat generating laser to liquefy unwanted
fat and then remove the liquid fat in one easy procedure. The entire procedure
can be done in one session on a number of different areas of the body including
the abdomen, waist (love handles), hips and thighs, buttocks, back of arms,
knees, ankles and even under the chin to remove unsightly “turkey necks”. 
 
In addition to removing unwanted fat, the heat generated by Lipotherme™ causes the
skin in the treated area to contract, resulting in firmer, smoother skin that further
enhances your body shaping goals. Skin tightening continues to improve for a period of
up to 4 months depending on your body’s unique chemistry.
 
Thomas A. Leach, M.D., owner of The Princeton Center for Plastic Surgery & Medispa
says, “I am truly amazed at the performance and results we are seeing from Lipotherme.
Hands down, this is the best minimally invasive fat removal procedure currently on the
market. My patients love the results because they can see them in the mirror the next
day.”

Learn more about Lipotherme laser lipo for body contouring at our next Office Open
House, Wednesday, September 29, 2010 from 3:00 pm- 7:00 pm.  RSVP: by Friday,
September 24, 2010 at 609-921.7161 or e-mail us at: mromero@princetonsurgery.com.
For more information visit our website at: www.princetonsurgery.com.
 
Princeton Center for Plastic Surgery & Medispa
Thomas A. Leach. M.D.
932 State Road
Princeton, NJ 08540
 
 

Valid from 09/20/2010 to 11/20/2010

FIRST LIVE WEB CHAT BY PRINCETON HEALTHCARE SYSTEM FOCUSES ON WOMEN’S HEALTH

09/20/2010

PRINCETON, NJ (Sept. 20, 2010) – Princeton HealthCare System (PHCS) will conduct its first live web chat on Monday, October 4, when it hosts a discussion about women’s pelvic floor disorders and treatment options.

The free program begins at 7 p.m. and can be joined by going to the PHCS USTREAM channel at www.ustream.tv/channel/princetonhealth.

“Social media has enormous potential for sharing information about health issues,” said Carol Norris, PHCS vice president for Marketing and Public Affairs.  “We anticipate that events like these will become another important tool in our ongoing community education and outreach efforts.”

More than a third of women are affected by urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, pelvic floor prolapse and other conditions known as pelvic floor disorders.  There have also been significant advances in treatment in recent years ranging from new drug therapies to robotic surgery techniques that are helping alleviate these problems for many women.

During the web chat, Heather van Raalte, MD, a fellowship-trained urogynecologist on the PHCS medical staff, will discuss pelvic floor disorders and treatment options, and also take questions from the online audience.

PHCS has a robust lineup of health education programs addressing topics of interest to women, men, seniors, children, adolescents and diverse populations. While many topics might have made for an interesting web chat, Norris said this one was chosen in part due to its sensitive nature, and the ability of participants to remain anonymous if they wish.

“Some health issues are more sensitive than others, and people may be hesitant to attend a traditional lecture and ask questions,” said Norris.  “One of the nice things about this program is its ability to let participants ask questions anonymously, from the privacy and comfort of their home.”

The web chat program can be accessed through either a PC or Mac computer. Participants will need a broadband internet connection and an Adobe Flash Player installed, available free online.

While pre-registration is not required, those who do pre-register will be eligible for one of several gift cards to be awarded immediately following the program.  Pre-registration is available through www.princetonhcs.org/calendar or by calling (609) 897-8980.

 

Valid from 09/20/2010 to 10/05/2010

jane's First Ever ESTATE SALE!!!!!

11/17/2011

 

jane's first ever estate sale!!


a fabulous lifetime collection!!
big furniture, lots of china & gadgets, gorgeous persian lamb fur!!

this first time event is a MUST!!

cash & carry...everything must go!!

saturday, november 19th
8am sharp (NO early birds)

505 province line road
hopewell, nj
(just north of 518)

Valid from 11/17/2011 to 11/20/2011

Princeton Symphony Orchestra Receives NEA Grant to Support First-Ever Performance of Censored Stalinist-Era Work

11/23/2011

Princeton, NJ—The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Chairman Rocco Landesman announced last week that the agency will award 863 grants to organizations and individual writers across the country. The Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) is one of the grantees and will receive an Art Works grant of $10,000 to support The Onegin Project, the world premiere of a resurrected musical drama by Sergei Prokofiev and Alexander Pushkin, presented in partnership with Princeton University’s music, dance, and Slavic studies departments.

 

The 1936 dramatization of Pushkin’s novel-in-verse Eugene Onegin, complete with music by Prokofiev, was censored and barred from performance by Soviet officials as part of Stalin’s campaign of repression and prosecution. After the censorship, the play script disappeared into various obscure Russian archives. Over the past few years, Princeton University professor of music Simon Morrison and professor of Slavic languages and literature Caryl Emerson worked to locate a copy of the play version with Prokofiev’s markings and translate it. This never-before-performed text will be reunited with its music and staged as originally conceived for orchestra, chorus, and dance, in a world premiere on February 9, 2012, at Richardson Auditorium, with the PSO performing Prokofiev’s score. The performance is included as part of a symposium on the subject of censorship in music, to be presented at Princeton University’s conference “After the End of Music History,” which will draw music scholars from around the world.

 

“Art Works is the guiding principle at the NEA,” says Landesman. “I’m pleased to see that principle represented through the 863 projects included in this announcement. These projects demonstrate the imaginative and innovative capacities of artists and arts organizations to enhance the quality of life in their communities.”

 

“Our music director, Rossen Milanov, and I are extremely proud and delighted that the Princeton Symphony Orchestra’s work is being recognized for the first time by the National Endowment for the Arts through the Art Works grant program,” says PSO Executive Director Melanie Clarke. “The first and most important hurdle when applying for an NEA grant is to demonstrate artistic excellence. In our case, the NEA assessed and approved audio samples which showcased the PSO in performances last season.

 

“There is no doubt that this honor comes as a result of the dedication to artistic excellence and community engagement exemplified by our musicians, our board, and our staff,” Clarke continues. “Achieving this national recognition, where we join the ranks of America’s most prominent orchestras, reinforces our belief that investment in the arts produces marvelous results for local citizenry. We look forward to carrying out this project and invite everyone in our community who has an interest in music to find out more about the Princeton Symphony Orchestra by attending our concerts and hearing firsthand this accomplished professional ensemble which makes its home in Princeton.”

 

In March 2011, the NEA received 1,686 eligible applications for Art Works requesting more than $84 million in funding. The resulting funding rate of 49% of eligible applications reflects both the significant demand for support and the ongoing vitality of the nonprofit arts community despite current financial challenges. Art Works grants are awarded based on the applications received by the NEA and assessment by the review panels.

 

The 863 grant awards total $22.543 million, encompass 15 artistic disciplines and fields, and support projects in 47 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. For a complete list of projects recommended for Art Works grant support, please visit the NEA website at www.arts.gov.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

ABOUT THE PRINCETON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Whether performing classical masterworks, introducing music by modern-day masters, or hosting students at their first live symphony performance, the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) is a cultural centerpiece of the Princeton community and one of New Jersey’s finest music organizations. Guided by an extraordinary Board of Trustees and invested in artistic excellence, the PSO offers orchestral, pops, and chamber music concerts of the highest quality, as well as lectures and other events to complement these concerts.  Through BRAVO!, the PSO produces wide-reaching and innovative education programs, carried out in partnerships with local schools and arts organizations. The PSO is proud to be a multiple-year recipient of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts’ highest honors: a Citation of Excellence and designation as a Major Arts Institution. The only professional orchestra to make its home in Princeton, the PSO performs at historic Richardson Auditorium on the campus of Princeton University. In June 2009, the Board of Trustees appointed Rossen Milanov as the PSO’s third music director.

 

Find the PSO online at www.princetonsymphony.org; on Facebook at www.facebook.com/princetonsymphony; and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/psomusic.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Valid from 11/23/2011 to 01/15/2012

RUTGERS NURSERY WINS FIRST PRIZE IN “STEAL THIS IDEA CONTEST”  

Ringoes, NJ—October 8, 2010—   Rutgers Nursery has won first prize in Today’s Garden Center magazine’s “Steal This Idea” contest.  Rutgers placed two larger than life, bright yellow Adirondack chairs in front of the nursery along US highway 202.  “People are having so much fun with these!  We have cars stopping all the time to take pictures.” Said Kris Santiago, Rutgers Nursery’s Marketing Manager.
 

The nursery’s eye-catching display was selected from entries submitted from garden centers all over the country.  It received a prize package that includes:

Two octagonal bench sets from Bench Systems
An on-site garden center makeover session with Green Branding
One Dramm Professional watering tools display
One Ames True Temper True American tool display

 
 
For information: http://www.rutgersLN.com or contact:
Leslie Boss
Sales & Customer Service Manager
LBoss@RutgersLN.com
908-788-2600, ext. 234
 
 


 

Valid from 10/11/2010 to 11/30/2010

Pet First Aid Course November 16, 2010

10/27/2010

Pet First Aid


Session Dates
November 16, 2010  9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Event Type: CPR and First Aid

Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center
Princeton North Shopping Center
1225 State Road
Princeton

The Pet First Aid course, designed by the American Safety & Health Institute (ASHI), teaches participants how to give immediate care to an injured or suddenly ill pet until veterinary care is available. Basic emergency care, CPR, common illnesses and medical emergencies will be covered. This program will focus on first aid for dogs; however, first aid applications for most pets are similar. Participants will receive a course completion certificate.

Cash and check payments must be made in person. Payments can be made Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., at:

Community Education & Outreach at Alexander Road
731 Alexander Road, Suite 103
Princeton

We recommend that you call 1.888.897.8979 to make arrangements ahead of time in order to minimize wait time.

Participants who are more than 15 minutes late will be denied entry into CPR courses held by PHCS.

Cost: $40.00

Please provide the names of all attendees.


Register Now!

Valid from 10/27/2010 to 11/17/2010

Lawrenceville Main Street Artists Network Celebrates First Anniversary With Reception and Show

10/27/2010

"Lawrenceville Main Street Artists' Network" - It's our birthday and we'll be celebrating our first birthday in the Gallery throughout November.  You're invited to the party, too!  Join us for our 2nd Saturday Artists'  Reception and First Birthday Party at the Artists' Network Gallery and Gift Shop on Saturday, Nov. 13 from 4 to 7 pm. We'll be partying with refreshments and member memories of this
exciting year.  Our artists will display work with the "CELEBRATE" theme, and you will find artwork, ornaments, cards and gifts for the holiday season.  Gallery and gift shop hours for November are Thurs.1-4pm, Fri - Sat 11am -9pm, Sun. 11am - 5pm  2683 Main Street (Corner of Main Street and Gordon Ave) Lawrenceville, NJ.
Visit our website www.lmsartistsnetwork.com, write info@lmsartistsnetwork.com, or call 609 512-1359. "

Valid from 10/27/2010 to 12/01/2010

Clothing Drive to Benefit Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad

10/26/2010

Clothing Drive to benefit Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, 237 N. Harrison St., Princeton.
Donations accepted on Friday, Nov. 5, 9am-7pm and Saturday, Nov. 6, 9am-2pm.


 

Valid from 10/26/2010 to 11/07/2010

Princeton Girlchoir Poised to Give Annual Winter Concert January 30 Performance to Feature All Six Choirs

01/18/2011

Freshly home from their appearance in Washington at Congressman Rush Holt’s swearing in, the Princeton Girlchoir is preparing for its only concert of the year to feature all six of the organization’s choirs.

The Grace Notes (the youngest choristers, beginning with the third grade), the Quarter Notes, the Semi-Tones, the Concert Choir, the Cantores (the high-school singers), and the select PGC Ensemble will combine their strengths for a performance on January 30 at 4pm, in Richardson Auditorium on the Princeton University campus.  The aptly titled concert, Come, Ye Makers of Song, takes its name from the piece that will be heard near the beginning of the program, written by Canadian composer Ruth Watson Henderson.  The namesake work will feature the Cantores and the Concert Choir, which together make up the largest and most accomplished body of singers in the Princeton Girlchoir. 

Indeed, “makers of song” might be said to describe not only the 200 singers who will participate in the 90-minute concert, but also the composers of the works they will sing, over half of whom are living and working at present.

The Concert Choir recently sang in Washington as a part of Congressman Rush Holt’s swearing-in ceremony.  There they offered Homeland by Gustav Holst, an anthem to unselfish dedication to the common good, as well as America the Beautiful.  They followed this performance in the Madison Building of the Library of Congress with a flash-mob of the National Anthem for the visitors awaiting entry to the Capitol Visitor Center. 

An extremely limited number of tickets for the January 30 concert are still available.  For more information, visit www.princetongirlchoir.org or call the Princeton Girlchoir at 609.688.1888.

Valid from 01/18/2011 to 01/31/2011

Princeton Young Achievers off to early start - With funding problems behind it, after-school problem to begin the first week of school

08/25/2006

Authors: Hilary Parker

The Princeton Packet

The Princeton Young Achievers after-school program for kids in low income families will start the first week of school this year. In prior years, the program hasnt been able to start promptly when school begins, but due to outstanding donations the program will be able to start on time this year.

Are you Thirsty?

02/14/2011

Many common illnesses and complaints might be caused by chronic unintentional dehydration. Are you drinking enough water? How much should you drink? What are the benefits?

 A few weeks ago it suddenly occurred to me that I hadn’t been drinking very much water during these long, cold winter weeks. Hmmm, maybe that’s why I had been waking up in the morning with a dry mouth and a slight headache. This revelation led me to remember an interesting book I had previously read about the importance of drinking adequate amounts of water.  Your Body's Many Cries for Water by F. Batmanghelidj, MD is a fascinating read and reveals how many of our common health problems can be solved by drink more water.

Dr Batmanghelidj, an American citizen, was born in Iran, educated in England and had his medical training and early practice in London. He was practicing medicine in Iran, however, when the revolution broke out in 1979 and he was imprisoned in the infamous Evin Prison and slated to be executed. In prison, many inmates had serious physical ailments and Dr Batmanghelidj was asked to help. Having no medical bag, no medicines, and no diagnostic tools, he was helpless to do much, but he began to prescribe two glasses of water for the prisoners with ulcer problems. Within ten minutes or so, these patients had relief from their pain and Dr Batmanghelidj told them to drink 2 glasses of water every three hours. Without any medicines these patients became free from the pain and discomforts of ulcers. During the thirty-one months Dr Batmanghelidj was imprisoned he treated more than three thousand people with water alone. He did extensive research during his prison stay about the effects of water on common degenerative illnesses and wrote about his findings. This report was smuggled out of Iran and ended up as an article in a medical journal as well as in the New York Times science section in June 1983.

 Dr Batmanghelidj was released from prison in 1982, escaped Iran, and made his way to the United States. where he focused his energies on developing the molecular understanding of the effect of chronic unintentional dehydration on the human body. These findings can now be found on the website: www.watercure.com.

Dr Batmanghelidj believed that the following traditional assumptions of the medical establishment were wrong: 1) a dry mouth signals the body’s need for water, 2) water has no chemical properties, 3) the human body is able to regulate water throughout life, and 4) any fluid will replace water.   He believed that by the time we have a dry mouth, we are already dehydrated. He believed that water is a main energizer in the body, creating hydroelectric energy at the cellular level.  He believed that as we age, we lose our ability to gauge our need for water. Also, he believed that our society’s huge intake of coffee, tea, and soda only amplifies the problem, as caffeine is a dehydrating agent, stressing the brain and the kidneys.         

Dr. Batmanghelidj thought that the body manifests dehydration in many, many ways from fatigue to anxiety to depression to morning sickness to allergies, asthma, high cholesterol and hypertension. He believed that the pain of ulcers, heartburn, migraines, colitis, and joints was the body’s emergency call for water. He believed the major complications from dehydration resulted in diseases like MS, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and even some forms of cancer. He contended that the medical establishment continues to treat illness with medication rather than water. He prescribes giving water a chance: you may be thirsty, not sick!

The Prescription:

Begin by realizing that the body has no water reservoir, so water must be consumed throughout the day.

Drink roughly half your body weight in ounces of water a day. (A 140-lb person should drink 70 oz of water a day.) A simple way to accomplish this is to drink 2-3 glasses as soon as you wake up when the body is most dehydrated from sleep. Then drink 2 glasses of water ½ hour before lunch and drink 2-3 glasses a few hours after a meal. Another glass towards the end of the evening and you should be close to the right amount.

Dr Batmanghelidj believed the balance of salt and water in the body was very, very important. He recommended adding ¼ tsp of unrefined sea salt to each quart of water we drink. (However, be sure to check with your doctor to make sure your sodium levels are normal and you are not prone to high blood pressure before adding additional salt to your diet, especially if you eat a lot of processed and restaurant foods which are sodium heavy.)

Try adding a little coconut water to your glass or bottle of water. It has 15 times the electrolytes of sports drinks, is low in calories, and has the potassium of two bananas per 8 ounces.

Try adding some Vitamin C to your water. 1,000 mg in a packet of Emergen-C or use unflavored, uncolored powdered vitamin C.

Valid from 02/15/2011

Announcing the First Annual Alexander’s Run Saturday, October 30th, 2010 in Historic Trenton, NJ

09/23/2010

The first Annual Alexander’s Run will take place Saturday, October 30th 2010.  The day’s events include a 5K race through historic Trenton and a 1 Mile Family Costume Fun Run/Walk.  The Run’s proceeds support the Alexander Michael Dodson Memorial Scholarship Fund and the Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Program.

Alexander was a happy, healthy, 19 ½ month old toddler who passed away unexpectedly in his sleep in December 2008.  The cause of his death remains unknown.  “Losing a child is the worst thing that can happen to a parent” says Alexander’s mother & Run Director Michelle Emerson. “We are hosting Alexander’s Run to raise awareness of this rare cause of childhood death and also to raise funds to research the cause(s) so that one day no other family will have to face this tragedy”.

This past summer, funds from Alexander’s Scholarship Fund were able to help send ten Trenton students to Stuart Country Day Summer Stars. The 4-week camp is open to second to sixth graders and includes instruction on the humanities, science and math. The Summer Stars Program is only open to Trenton residents and is designed to strengthen Stuart's ties with the community through service to children. 

“Summer Stars offers such an important outlet for children every summer.  From musical instruction to academic enrichment, it provides a strong foundation for the school year. We were so pleased and overwhelmed that the Alexander Michael Dodson Memorial Scholarship Fund chose to support the Summer Stars program this year." said Dr. Patty Fagin, new Head of School at Stuart Country Day School.   "The support of the Fund allowed 10 children to experience a summer filled with enriching activities.” 

Onsite Registration for Alexander’s Run begins at 7:45am, the 5K (certified course) race begins at 9:00am and the 1 Mile Fun Run/Walk begins at 9:30am.  The start and end of the run is located in Mill Hill Park.  Free parking is available at Liberty Commons parking garage located at 16 E. Front Street in Trenton.

Runners and walkers of all ages are encouraged to participate in the events.  Michelle Emerson added, “We hope everyone will come out for a morning of fun and exercise while helping to support the run as we celebrate Alexander’s life and those of the other children who have been lost due to SUDC.”

Registration for the 5K is $20 in advance and $25 the day of the run. Costs for the 1 Mile Fun Run/Walk are $10 for the first family member, $5 each additional family member in the same household.  Registration for both the 5K and the 1 Mile Fun Run/Walk is available online at www.alexandersrun.org/Registration.html.  

There will be several post race activities in Mill Hill Park including performances by Alex of Alex & the Kaleidoscope Band, the Trenton Thrill Dancers, a costume contest for 1 Mile Fun Run/Walk participants, children’s activities and more.

More information on the run including how to donate can be found online at: www.alexandersrun.org.  Alexander’s Run is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/AlexandersRun) & Twitter (AlexandersRun).

The Alexander Michael Dodson Memorial Scholarship Fund

The Alexander Michael Dodson Memorial Scholarship Fund was created to celebrate the memory of Alexander and the joy he brought to all those around him.

Alexander was born on May 3, 2007, to Daniel Dodson and Michelle Emerson.  At just 19 ½ months old, he passed away in his sleep on December 20, 2008. This fund will help support educational opportunities for children in the Mercer County, NJ area.

From the day he was born, Alexander was smiling and happy.  He loved to make others happy as well and could always be counted on for a kiss or a hug.  He loved to dance, eat waffles, read books, play with his friends, and watch Wow Wow Wubbzy.

The Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Program (SUDC)

History and Mission

The SUDC Program was created at the CJ Foundation for SIDS in September 2001 by two mothers (Laura Crandall and Chelsea Hilbert) who lost their toddler aged children to SUDC and approached the CJ Foundation for support and answers. Today, the SUDC Program raises research funds and provides a centralized resource for information, support and advocacy. It serves families and professionals affected by the tragedy of SUDC, and promotes awareness of SUDC in communities.

SUDC Facts

  • Occurs in children over the age of 12 months.  Is a diagnosis of exclusion- assigned when all known causes of death have been ruled out
  • Its incidence is approximately 1.2 deaths per 100,000 children.  In comparison, the incidence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is 45 times more common
  • We do not know of any way to reduce the risk of SUDC
  • It is unpredictable and unpreventable at this time.  Research dollars are crucial in uncovering the mystery of SUDC

SUDC is not new, but it is rare with a reported incidence of 1.2 deaths per 100,000 children, compared to 54 deaths per 100,000 live births for SIDS (United States, 2005). Presently, SUDC cannot be predicted and/or prevented since its cause is unknown. Most SUDC deaths occur between the ages of 1 and 3, but researchers have looked at cases of children as old as 15.

Researchers are working to identify the cause(s) and risk(s) of SUDC. But until a day when no family experiences this tragic loss, the SUDC program will continue to raise funds for research, aid in the creation of state and national legislation to further SUDC investigations, and provide programs and services for SUDC families across the country. 

The SUDC Program has grown exponentially since its inception, mainly due to SUDC families across the country raising critical research dollars and raising major public awareness about this mysterious malady. Since 2001, the SUDC Program has raised a cumulative total of over $1 Million dollars for SUDC research, awareness and support services.

Research for SUDC is making progress, but continues to require increased funding- currently no federal funding of the SUDC Research Project exists. It is solely dependent on private donations. To help support the mission of the SUDC program secure online donations can be made through www.sudc.org  or mailed to: The SUDC Program. c/o CJ Foundation, 30 Prospect Ave, Hackensack, NJ 07601 

For more information on the SUDC Program, visit www.SUDC.org.

Valid from 09/23/2010 to 10/31/2010

LEWIS SCHOOL OF PRINCETON'S 3rd ANNUAL FIRST CHILD IN THE WOODS WALK-A-THON October 23, 2010

10/01/2010

 

3rd ANNUAL
FIRST CHILD IN THE WOODS WALK-A-THON
In Memory of William Gaynor Dovey

Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, Mercer County Park

9:30 a.m. — Sign-In & Registration for
Children’s Fun Run & Walk-A-Thon
10:00 a.m. — National Anthem
10:15 a.m. — 1 Mile Children’s Race Begins
10:30 a.m. — 5 Mile Walk-A-Thon Kick-off

Registration is only $10 per walker (age 7 and up).
We urge every walker to aim for $100 or more in pledges.
That’s 10 people @ just a $10 donation …
or 4 people @ a $25 donation … it’s easy!
We know you can do it!

Make donation checks payable
(with First Child in the Woods in memo line) to:
The Lewis School of Princeton.
(Address: Lewis School, 53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540)

 

All proceeds benefit The Lewis School Annual Fund

Please click here to register online

Valid from 10/01/2010 to 10/24/2010

Holiday Craft Fairs 2010

12/04/2010

(11/12/2010 - Craft Fairs), Arts and Crafts Show, Transformations, Hopewell Train Station, Railroad Place, Hopewell, 609-397-8126
Noon., Jewelry, hand-blown glass, ceramics, fiber arts, wood, clothing, paintings, baskets, and floor clothes. The sale ran for 25 years at the Princeton University bookstore and has been in Hopewell since 2002. Opening reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Continues Saturday, November 13, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, November 14, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

(11/13/2010 - Craft Fairs), Holiday Craft Fair, Montgomery High School, 1016 Route 601, Skillman, 609-462-9335
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 'Montgomery Made by Hand' includes hand-blown glass, scroll-work, jewelry, woven textiles, puppets, natural soaps, fine art, baskets, photography, hand knit scarves and sweaters, fiber art, and pottery. Benefit for district-wide art based projects organized by the school's chapter of the National Art Honor Society. Free admission.

(11/13/2010 - Craft Fairs), Craft Fair, St. Gregory the Great School, 4620 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square
9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Homemade crafts, vendor items, used books, breakfast and lunch. E-mail sggcraftshow@comcast.net for information. $3 admission.

(11/13/2010 - Craft Fairs), Arts and Crafts Show, Transformations, Hopewell Train Station, Railroad Place, Hopewell, 609-397-8126
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Jewelry, Hand-blown glass, ceramics, fiber arts, wood, clothing, paintings, baskets, and floor clothes. The sale ran for 25 years at the Princeton University bookstore and has been in Hopewell since 2002. Continues Sunday, November 14, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

(11/14/2010 - Craft Fairs), Holiday Bazaar! Get your holiday shopping done all in one place! Vendor show with crafters, gold buyer, home party vendors and local businesses. Come to this free event and get your holiday shopping done all while helping out a great cause! Swag (give-a-way) bags given to the 1st 100 guests. Raffles, proceeds to benefit kissesforkyle.org.
For more info, go to:
www.shoppingforkisses.com, Union Fire Hall, 1396 River Road, Titusville NJ

(11/14/2010 - Craft Fairs), Arts and Crafts Show, Transformations, Hopewell Train Station, Railroad Place, Hopewell, 609-397-8126
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Jewelry, hand-blown glass, ceramics, fiber arts, wood, clothing, paintings, baskets, and floor clothes. The sale ran for 25 years at the Princeton University bookstore and has been in Hopewell since 2002.

(11/20/2010 - Craft Fairs), Craft Show, Bordentown Elks, 11 Amboy Road, Bordentown, 609-585-2254
9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Indoors. Tables are $30.

(11/20/2010 - Craft Fairs), The Hopewell United Methodist Church will hold its annual Christmas Bazaar on Saturday, November 20th from 9:30 AM to 3:30 PM.  Stroll down Candy Cane Lane to the Sugar and Spice Bake Shop where you will find a variety of homemade baked goods, pickles, relishes, jams and jellies. Continue along to the Crafter’s Gift Boutique to find handmade crafts, Christmas and Holiday decorations and unique gift items.

The Church is located at 20 Blackwell Avenue in Hopewell, NJ and is handicap accessible.  For more information, please call the church office at (609) 466-0471.

(11/20/2010 - Craft Fairs), Crafters' Marketplace, YWCA Princeton, John Witherspoon School, Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-497-2100
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., The annual juried craft show showcasing more than 140 professional artisans from the Northeast exhibiting original handmade jewelry, pottery, clothing and other gift items. Cafe lunch and homemade baked goods. Proceeds benefit the Pearl Bates Scholarship fund. No strollers. Handicapped-accessible. $6. Also Sunday, November 21.,
www.ywcaprinceton.org

(11/21/2010 - Craft Fairs), Crafters' Marketplace, YWCA Princeton, John Witherspoon School, Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-497-2100
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., The annual juried craft show showcasing more than 140 professional artisans from the Northeast exhibiting original handmade jewelry, pottery, clothing and other gift items. Cafe lunch and homemade baked goods. Proceeds benefit the Pearl Bates Scholarship fund. No strollers. Handicapped-accessible. $6.,
www.ywcaprinceton.org

(12/03/2010 - Craft Fairs), Sauce for the Goose, Arts Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777
4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Opening reception for the annual arts and crafts sale featuring paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats, and scarves. Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through December 21.,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

(12/04/2010 - Craft Fairs), Winter “Holiday” Bazaar – a community fund raiser December 4, 2010 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Pennington Fire House on Brommel Place, Pennington, NJ.  This event is open to the public with free admission.  Gifts – Crafts & Treasurers which are new, gently used and or handmade will be featured along with fresh baked goods for purchase.  Vendors are welcome for this event & will be considered on a first come first serve basis prior to the event.  To reserve a table please call 737.2751 or email eschwab@glorianilson.com with your request.  Table charge $30. Includes table & chairs.   

(12/04/2010 - Craft Fairs), St. Nicholas Bazaar, Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, 609-924-2277
9 a.m. to 2 p.m., The annual holiday event features three floors of holiday shopping and family activities including gingerbread houses, St. Nicholas himself, antiques, china, hand knit scarves and children's sweaters, cookie walk, books, gently used holiday attire, and ornament making. Lunch available. Free admission.,
www.trinityprinceton.org

(12/04/2010 - Craft Fairs), Holiday Craft Show, High School South, 346 Clarksville Road, Princeton Junction, 609-716-5050
9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., $1 admission for charity. Babysitting available. No strollers please.

(12/04/2010 - Craft Fairs), Sauce for the Goose, Arts Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Arts and crafts sale featuring paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats, and scarves. Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through December 21.,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

(12/06/2010 - Craft Fairs), Sauce for the Goose, Arts Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Arts and crafts sale featuring paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats, and scarves. Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through December 21.,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

(12/08/2010 - Craft Fairs), Sauce for the Goose, Arts Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Arts and crafts sale featuring paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats, and scarves. Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through December 21.,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

(12/11/2010 - What's in Store), Gifts of Natural Art and Craft Fair, Slow Food Central New Jersey, D&R Greenway's Johnson Education Center, Rosedale Road, 609-577-5113
10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Local farm vendors and food producers, arts, gifts of nature, crafts. Free admission. A portion of proceeds will be donated to D&R Land Trust.,
www.slowfoodcentralnj.org

(12/11/2010 - What's in Store), Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, 609-394-9436
11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Holiday Outpost is a holiday gift shop filled with works of area artists and craftspeople.,
www.artworkstrenton.org

(12/13/2010 - Craft Fairs), Sauce for the Goose, Arts Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Arts and crafts sale featuring paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats, and scarves. Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through December 21.,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

(12/15/2010 - Craft Fairs), Sauce for the Goose, Arts Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Arts and crafts sale featuring paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats, and scarves. Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through December 21.,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

(12/20/2010 - Craft Fairs), Sauce for the Goose, Arts Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Arts and crafts sale featuring paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats, and scarves. Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through December 21.,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

(12/21/2010 - Craft Fairs), Sauce for the Goose, Arts Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Arts and crafts sale featuring paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats, and scarves. Last day.,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org

Valid from 12/04/2010 to 12/22/2010

Beaujolais Nouveau 2010 Now at Princeton Corkscrew - First Come, First Serve!

11/18/2010

First Come, First Serve
ONLY 56 Cases!
Celebrate the beginning of the holiday season with BOJO!
The 2010 growing season in Beaujolais was as textbook as ever. A slow, cool growing season allowed for the Gamay grapes to ripen slowly, preserving the fresh, bright fruits. The last three weeks were perfectly warm, allowing the fruits to soften, while maintaining its firm acidity and drinkability.

2010 will be a vintage decided by the farmers and winemakers -- ONLY THE GREATS, like Christophe and Bertrand Lacaille of Domaine Haut-Lambert can make truly phenomenal BOJO.

Princeton Corkscrew Wine Shop | 609.430.1200 | 49 Hulfish Street | Princeton | NJ | 08542

 

Valid from 11/18/2010 to 12/15/2010

Seventh Annual ACA-NJ Camp Fairs Events Calendar

01/02/2011

 

Calendar of Events

 


 
 
Saturday, January 15, 2011 

 

Seventh Annual ACA-NJ Camp Fairs

 

Noon-4 p.m.

 

       …connecting great kids with great camps…
 
 
 
FREE ADMISSION
 
 
 
COME FIND A GREAT CAMP!
 
 
 
     Bridgewater Marriott, 700 Commons Way, Bridgewater

 

Camps of All Kinds: Day, Overnight, Adventure, Computer, Special
 
Interest, Special Needs, Travel and more
 
 
 
Meet Camp Directors, get door prizes, Free giveaways from camps,
 
Free Snacks, Free DVDs of camps, Free brochures, Jobs available,
 
Bring the family, Free Parking
 
 
 
For a list of participating camps and directions:
 
www.acanjsummercampfairs.org <http://www.acanjsummercampfairs.org/>   or call 877-488-2267
 
 

 

Sunday, January 16, 2011 

 

Seventh Annual ACA-NJ Camp Fairs

 

Noon-4 p.m.

 

 

       …connecting great kids with great camps…
 
 
 
FREE ADMISSION 
 
 
 
 COME FIND A GREAT CAMP!
 
 
 
The Grand Summit Hotel, 570 Springfield Avenue, Summit 07901

 
 
Camps of All Kinds: Day, Overnight, Adventure, Computer, Special
 
Interest, Special Needs, Travel and more
 
 
 
Meet Camp Directors, get door prizes, Free giveaways from camps,
 
Free Snacks, Free DVDs of camps, Free brochures, Jobs available,
 
Bring the family, Free Parking
 
 
 
For a list of participating camps and directions:
 
www.acanjsummercampfairs.org <http://www.acanjsummercampfairs.org/>   or call 877-488-2267
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Saturday, January 22, 2011 

 
 
Seventh Annual ACA-NJ Camp Fairs

 

Noon-4 p.m.

       …connecting great kids with great camps…
 
 
 
COME FIND A GREAT SUMMER CAMP!
 
 
 
FREE ADMISSION
 
 
 
The MarketFair Mall, 3535 US Route 1 South at Meadow Road, 

 Princeton, NJ 08540

       

       Camps of All Kinds: Day, Overnight, Adventure, Computer, Special
 
Interest, Special Needs, Travel and more
 
 
 
Meet Camp Directors, get door prizes, Free giveaways from camps,
 
Free Snacks, Free DVDs of camps, Free brochures, Jobs available,
 
Bring the family, Free Parking
 
 
 
For a list of participating camps and directions:
 
www.acanjsummercampfairs.org <http://www.acanjsummercampfairs.org/>  or call 877-488-2267
 
 
 
 
 
Sunday, January 23, 2011

 

Seventh Annual ACA-NJ Camp Fairs

 

Noon-4 p.m.

 

       …connecting great kids with great camps…
 
 
 
         COME FIND A GREAT CAMP!
 
 
 
FREE ADMISSION
 
 
 
     The Clinton Inn Hotel, 145 Dean Drive, Tenafly 07670

 
 
Camps of All Kinds: Day, Overnight, Adventure, Computer, Special
 
Interest, Special Needs, Travel and more
 
Meet Camp Directors, get door prizes, Free giveaways from camps,
 
Free Snacks, Free DVDs of camps, Free brochures, Jobs available,
 
Bring the family, Free Parking
 
For a list of participating camps and directions:
 
www.acanjsummercampfairs.org <http://www.acanjsummercampfairs.org/>   or call 877-488-2267
 
 
 

 


 
 
Saturday, January 29, 2011

 

 

Seventh Annual ACA-NJ Camp Fairs

 

Noon-4 p.m.

 

       …connecting great kids with great camps…
 
 
 
COME FIND A GREAT CAMP!
 
 
 
FREE ADMISSION
 
 
 
Woodcliff Lake Hilton, 200 Tice Boulevard, Woodcliff Lake 07677

 
 
Camps of All Kinds: Day, Overnight, Adventure, Computer, Special
 
Interest, Special Needs, Travel and more
 
 
 
Meet Camp Directors, get door prizes, Free giveaways from camps,
 
Free Snacks, Free DVDs of camps, Free brochures, Jobs available,
 
Bring the family, Free Parking
 
 
 
For a list of participating camps and directions:
 
www.acanjsummercampfairs.org <http://www.acanjsummercampfairs.org/>   or call 877-488-2267
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sunday, January 30, 2011

 

Seventh Annual ACA-NJ Camp Fairs

 

Noon-4 p.m.

 

       …connecting great kids with great camps…
 
 
 
COME FIND A GREAT CAMP!
 
 
 
FREE ADMISSION
 
 
 
     East Hanover Ramada Inn and Conference Center,130 Route 10 West, East Hanover 07936

 
 
Camps of All Kinds: Day, Overnight, Adventure, Computer, Special
 
Interest, Special Needs, Travel and more
 
 
 
Meet Camp Directors, get door prizes, Free giveaways from camps,
 
Free Snacks, Free DVDs of camps, Free brochures, Jobs available,
 
Bring the family, Free Parking
 
 
 
For a list of participating camps and directions:
 
www.acanjsummercampfairs.org <http://www.acanjsummercampfairs.org/>   or call 877-488-2267
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sunday, March 27, 2011

 

Seventh Annual ACA-NJ Camp Fairs

 

Noon-4 p.m.

 

       …connecting great kids with great camps…
 
 
 
COME FIND A GREAT CAMP!
 
 
 
FREE ADMISSION
 
 
 
Mt. Laurel Marriott, 915 Route 73, Mt. Laurel 08054

 
 
Camps of All Kinds: Day, Overnight, Adventure, Computer, Special
 
Interest, Special Needs, Travel and more
 
 
 
Meet Camp Directors, get door prizes, Free giveaways from camps,
 
Free Snacks, Free DVDs of camps, Free brochures, Jobs available,
 
Bring the family, Free Parking
 
 
 
For a list of participating camps and directions:
 
www.acanjsummercampfairs.org <http://www.acanjsummercampfairs.org/>   or call 877-488-2267
 
 

Valid from 01/02/2011 to 03/28/2011

Internal Revenue Service: IRS

04/02/2007

Internal Revenue Service: IRS

04/02/2007

Valid from 07/20/2009

Storming Robots Wins First Place in the USA RobocupJunior Competition for 2nd Year in a Row

05/20/2010

Branchburg, NJ - May 5th, 2010,   Teams from Storming Robots, a Robotics Learning Center for Grades 3-12, have won First and Second Place in the USA RobocupJunior (RCJ) competition for the second year in a row. 

The RobocupJunior competition is where students program and build robots to perform certain tasks.  Many of these tasks attempt to simulate real world  problems which robotics can solve.  For example, the Storming Robots teams were tasked to build a robot that would find and rescue victims from a natural disaster.

On April 11th, 2010, the Northeast regional competition was held at the New York Hall of Science in Queens.  Storming Robots teams took the first three spots at the regional.  On April 23rd, Storming Robots was notified that its score ranked  two of its teams over others in all regional teams throughout the United States.

First place team "Alpha Kata Omega" consisted of team members Michael Xie (captain), Sunny Aggarwal and David Hua.  Second Place team "The Symmetric Turtles" consisted of Akash Kumar (captain), Dhevin Gupta and Stephen Therianos.

Another team named "To the M.A.K.S." placed third in the Northeast regional but did not place over other USA teams.   Their members consisted of Michelle Lu (captain), Kathleen Conley  and Ashley Yang.

Principal coach Elizabeth Mabrey, founder and director of Storming Robots, led the teams at the competition.   She said, "This game is not for the faint-hearted.  These children are taught to be creative and effective problems solvers.  Their participation reflects their perseverance and aptitude to work with technical complexity not commonly present in their age group."

Mrs. Mabrey was particularly excited for the all-girls team, "To the M.A.K.S.", who earned the Third Place at their first time participating in the competition.  One of Mrs. Mabrey's goals is to encourage girls' involvement in engineering, science and math.  

Team member Ashley Yang described how challenging the competition is.  Yang said, "It is very difficult. My head hurts trying to figure out the solution, but I'm having lots of fun though!"

Children being the center of interest

To many people, scoring is the most important concern.  Elizabeth Mabrey expressed what her biggest concerns were during the competition.  "When I am working with the children there are only 3 things I care about. That I provide guidance, but not do their work.  That I make sure they are not over-stressed.  And that they learn as much as possible during the process."

Even though RCJ is a grade-level participation game, it demands high aptitude in abstract thinking, especially in programming the robot's intelligence to handle variable elements on the game.  It allows its students to refine project outcomes over time with more sophisticated algorithms and hardware improvement without performing  similar routines every year.  

What's next

What's next

 

In 2009, a team from Storming Robots represented the United States at the RoboCupJunior World Tournament in Graz, Austria.   Storming Robots will continuously challenge its own teams to  win its way to the World Tournament in the future. The World Tournament of RCJ takes place in conjunction with RoboCup, which is attended by hundreds of research scientists and engineers from around the world.  Interfacing with these researchers truly sparks inspiration and interests in engineering  among these young children.


About Storming Robots:

These RoboCupJunior participants are among the many talented students who attend Storming Robots weekly to develop their robotics knowledge throughout the school year.  Besides school year programs, Storming Robots also provides summer robotics camp.  

For information about Storming Robots' robotics programs:

Elizabeth Mabrey,

Director of Storming Robots

908-595-1010

admin@stormingrobots.com

3322 Rt. 22 West, Suite 402

Branchburg, NJ 08876

http://www.stormingrobots.com

http://www.stormingrobots.com/prod/media/videoAd.wmv

Valid from 05/20/2010 to 08/20/2010

Getting Ready for Camp: Getting Ready for Camp - First Time Away From Home

04/19/2006

Authors: Mark B. Levin, M.D. and Timothy J. Patrick-Miller, M.D.
The Pediatric Group

Separating from our child is one of the hardest things we parents have to do. We spend our time nurturing, teaching and protecting. Having to delegate that responsibility to someone else is always traumatic. But separate we must, both to give ourselves some space, but also to allow our child to develop independence and self-responsible behaviors. Camp affords opportunities for some activities not always available at home and gives us and our child a break from the daily routine of the balance of the year. Of course, we must select the appropriate age and developmental stage for our child. Some children are ready for overnight camp at a younger age than his/her peers.

Our first chore, after deciding that sleep-away camp is right for our child, is the selection of the camp. Camps come in a variety of flavors: arts and crafts, general sports, specific sports, performing arts, outdoor nature activities, boating and a little of everything. The best way to decide what type of camp to pick is to ask the child we s/he wants to do and to find out whether any of his/her friends are attending a specific camp. Keep in mind that the camp experience is for your child's enjoyment and learning, not for you to hone a particular skill in your child that you lack. The ultimate goal of a first camp experience is to foster independence and self-reliance. The more the child is involved in the selection process, the easier his/her adjustment will be.

Safety at camp is always a basic concern. Camps that are certified by a camp association (see http://camppage.com/other.html) usually have written policies and procedures in place that ensure safety. You should ascertain that the policies have been approved by a pediatrician or family practitioner with pediatric expertise. Your child should have had a complete physical examination during the year prior to attending camp. This is to assure that he has no physical or emotional issues that may impact his/her adjustment to and participation in camp activities. Fill out the camp application and health form honestly and accurately so that camp personnel have all the information needed to respond appropriately to your child's physical or emotional needs and to prevent any adverse events. He examination should include a review of the child's immunizations, in particular those for tetanus, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, pneumococcus, hemophilus influenza type b and meningococcus. Include on the emergency contact form your 24/7 contact information (cell phone or pager, as well as home and work phone numbers).

Once the preliminaries are done, you should turn your attention to preparing your child for the out-of-home experience. You can arrange sleep-overs at a friend's house (a misnomer because children rarely sleep during these get-togethers!) and family trips away from home, even for a weekend. Children typically experience home-sickness about two weeks after the start of camp. It lasts a few days and resolves as long as a child is comforted and reassured by the camp staff. The camp personnel must prevent teasing by a child's peers, which is likely to make a child more insecure and home sick.

Your drop-off procedure should also be designed to minimize any opportunity for long, drawn-out good-byes. Say "Good-bye" at home where your child feels secure. After that, take on the role of a livery driver. The drop-off should be short and sweet. At drop-off, try to connect your child with a friend going to the same camp or offer to take the friend with you to the drop-off. Expect a few tears (on your part, as well as on the part of your child), but do not let those tears change your separation plans. If things do not go as planned and you realize that your assessment of your child's readiness is inaccurate, you can always cancel the camp attendance. You may have to negotiate a fee refund.

Once the child departs for camp, be sure to write letters and/or email. The content of the communication should dwell on the goings-on at camp, rather than what is happening at home. Citing events that the child is missing may only enhance the likelihood of home-sickness. Packages of entertainment items and food are good to send, as long as they conform with the camp's policies. Camps generally frown upon packages containing items that may attract rodents and your child would be disappointed if he offending material was confiscated. While your child is away, you should start to think about what rules and customs at home may change as a result of the camp experience. If your child becomes more independent, you will not want to undermine this new achievement by continuing restrictions that were necessary for his/her previously less mature state.

As with written communication, when the time comes for visiting day, try to concentrate on camp activities rather than on what is happening at home. Let your child be the tour guide at camp, even if you are familiar with the topography. Remember that, for your child, the nooks and crannies at camp are new discoveries. Allowing him/her to demonstrate mastery of the terrain will be a positive step toward re-enrollment next year. Give your child a ten minute warning before you have to leave, then follow the brief good-bye procedure you used at the initial camp drop-off.

At the end of camp pick-up, be sure to be on time. Being left until last will surely make your child feel stranded and abandoned. Allow sufficient time for him/her to say "Good-bye" to his/her friends and exchange contact information. Once this is done, do not dally. Hop in the car and start the conversation with all the neat things that await your child on arrival home. Always try to talk about what the child will gain, not what s/he is losing. You can always debrief the summer activities once the readjustment to home has been successfully negotiated.

Good luck with the process and enjoy your summer!

Valid from 07/20/2009

Craft Cleaners Places Princeton First in the State for Sustainable Dry Cleaning Practices!  

03/10/2011

Craft Cleaners has placed Princeton first in the state for sustainable dry cleaning practices!  

Who would have known?  

Craft Cleaners, a recent Sustainable Princeton Leadership award winner,  is known worldwide for their dry cleaning innovations including:

Air Quality- Using the Solvair Cleaning System, Craft Cleaners reduced approx. 4 tons of solvent from being used in the cleaning process.  They were the first to do so inNJ, and 2nd in the world do so.

Waste Reduction- Their waste is no longer added to landfills and instead sold and reprocessed into alternative fuel.  This has saved over 3.5 tons of waste from being landfilled.

Water Use - Use of computer controlled Miele washers have saved many gallons of water and reduced the amount of dirty water and detergents going into the local water treatment system.

Packaging- Craft Cleaners limit the use of excessive packaging and recycle hangers and their plastice bags used are bio-degradable.

In addition, Craft Cleaners has sponsored clothing drives to benefit the Mercer Alliance to End Homelessness in Mercer County.

Please call:  Owner, Tom Jannick, (609) 610-1721 to learn more about this truly Sustainable Princeton business.  


Valid from 03/10/2011 to 04/24/2011

Hunterdon Regional Cancer Center Among First in the Nation to Treat Advanced Prostate Cancer Patients with PROVENGE

03/16/2011

Hunterdon Regional Cancer Center is among the first sites in the nation
to treat advanced prostate cancer patients with PROVENGE®
(sipuleucel-T), the first in a new therapeutic class known as autologous
cellular immunotherapies.  PROVENGE was approved by the U.S. Food and
Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of men with asymptomatic or
minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory)
prostate cancer and is made by Dendreon Corporation.

 PROVENGE is an autologous (made from a patient’s own immune cells)
cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate a patient’s immune system
to identify and target prostate cancer cells. Each dose is manufactured
specifically for each patient using his immune cells.

PROVENGE Safety
PROVENGE is intended solely for autologous use and is not routinely
tested for transmissible infectious diseases.

In controlled clinical trials, serious adverse events reported in the
PROVENGE group included acute infusion reactions (occurring within 1 day
of infusion) and cerebrovascular events.  Severe (Grade 3) acute
infusion reactions were reported in 3.5% of patients in the PROVENGE
group.  Reactions included chills, fever, fatigue, asthenia, dyspnea,
hypoxia, bronchospasm, dizziness, headache, hypertension, muscle ache,
nausea, and vomiting. No Grade 4 or 5 acute infusion reactions were
reported in patients in the PROVENGE group.

The most common adverse events (incidence ≥15%) reported in the
PROVENGE group are chills, fatigue, fever, back pain, nausea, joint
ache, and headache.

Please see full Prescribing Information for PROVENGE at
www.provenge.com.

About Prostate Cancer
According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the most
common non-skin cancer in the United States and the third most common
cancer worldwide. More than two million men in the United States have
prostate cancer, with an estimated 217,730 new cases and approximately
32,050 men expected to die from the disease in 2010.

Individuals interested in learning whether PROVENGE is an appropriate
treatment option should contact Hunterdon Regional Cancer Center at
1-888-788-1260 or call 1-877-336-3736.  For full Prescribing
Information, please visit www.PROVENGE.com.

Hunterdon Regional Cancer Center is a partner of Fox Chase Cancer
Center. Its comprehensive services include chemotherapy, radiation
therapy, clinical research, early detection and screening programs,
support groups, educational programs, nutrition counseling, psychosocial
support, complimentary therapies and cancer risk assessment.

 

Valid from 03/16/2011 to 05/16/2011

Princeton-Blairstown Builds Advisory Council

03/27/2015

Welcomes More Princeton Alumni to Board and Advisory Roles

 

Princeton, NJ – March 26, 2015 -- The Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) this month welcomed a new board member and continued to build a strong, diverse Advisory Council. PBC offers a wide variety of youth development experiential educational programs to students including groups from Rivera Middle School and Trenton Central High West in Trenton, New Jersey and Global Neighborhood Secondary School in New York City. 

“The Advisory Council offers us the opportunity to bring more experienced, engaged community members, child advocates and philanthropic individuals to our cause.  They may not want the commitment of a trustee role but we are happy to have them serve as advisors,” said Pam Gregory, Executive Director.  Recent appointees include Mark Washington, Manager of IT, Finance and Administrative Services at Princeton University, Dr. Kathy Gordon, LCSW, Assistant Executive Director of Good Shepherd Services in New York City and Princeton University alumni Al Kaemmerlen, Marina Murvandize Mitchell, Aida Lupe Pacheco, Everard K. Pinneo and Dr. Marta E. Santos.

The Council serves as a critical community champion of PBC, with members sharing their gifts in service to the mission with professional expertise; knowledge of diverse constituent perspectives; connections to local, national or international resources; philanthropic support or other forms of assistance.

PBC also welcomed a new Trustee this month, Praveena Joseph-de Saram, an entrepreneur and research scientist at Princeton University.  Ms. Joseph de Saram, a Princeton graduate, owns and manages her own business.  She invented and brought to market a novel biodegradable pet waste collection device produced using renewable materials and manufactured by women working from their own homes in Asia.

PBC’s signature Social Emotional Learning (SEL) program at Rivera is a leadership program designed to increase students’ emotional intelligence and critical thinking skills, reduce behavioral issues, and ensure that students are engaged in school and avoid dropping out of school. PBC’s evidence-based program focuses on engaging the whole child – socially, academically and emotionally.  PBC uses an experiential education methodology with a focus on SEL that allows students to become more engaged.

 

At the Blairstown Campus, a 264-acre expanse in northwest New Jersey, students participate in intensive small group adventure-based experiential workshops designed to improve skills such as leadership, goal-setting, and healthy risk-taking. These experiences also promote environmental stewardship and complement students' classroom education in science.  Most students have never experienced many of the outdoor elements of these trips. 

 

About Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC)

PBC, an affiliate of Princeton University, seeks to transform the lives of vulnerable young people through integrated experiential and adventure-based programming in schools and at our outdoor campus. What began in 1908 as a summer camp run by Princeton University students to give inner-city boys an opportunity to have a character-building fresh air experience has evolved into a wide variety of year-round youth development experiential educational programs serving over 5,200 students from the Mid-Atlantic States.  For more information on PBC’s services or to donate, visit www.princetonblairstowncenter.org.
 

Valid from 03/27/2015 to 05/15/2015

The Wilberforce School's First Graduation

06/22/2011


 

The Wilberforce School celebrated its first 8th grade graduation on June 2nd.   This is a significant milestone for the school.  TWS is a classical Christian school in Princeton, founded in 2005 with 28 students in grades JK through 3.  Each year since 2005, the school increased its enrollment (100 enrolled this year) and added one grade-level per year.  This year we completed our grade-level expansion with 8th grade, and celebrated our first graduation.  The first graduating class had five students, pictured in the photo below.  Left to right: Francie Peña, Emily Chun, Matthew Mariman, Stephanie Nettleship, Marian Farrell.

 

Valid from 06/22/2011 to 08/15/2011

Pennington Montessori Awarded Silver LEED Certification First School in New Jersey

07/26/2011

 

Pennington Montessori School earns Silver LEED-EB Certification this June.  The certification was awarded by the United States Green Council, and makes Pennington Montessori the first School in New Jersey to transform its entire campus, existing buildings, to a Silver Leed Certified Operation. 

 

The School has been working with the Council for more than a year to meet the strict criteria for Silver LEED-EB status.  The implications affect every area of the School from cleaning supplies and maintenance materials to classroom habits and office procedures. The certification reflects a School-wide commitment to sustainability. 

 

According to USGBC, there are only six other school’s nationally, which have earned the Silver LEED-EB Certification. 

 

A green curriculum includes on-site gardening and composting lessons.  “The faculty and students are eager to participate in our sustainability initiatives and goals,” explains Director Kathleen Hannah.  “Thanks to the commitment shown by the faculty, the students are really absorbing the concepts and their power to impact the environment.”

 

“It requires a great deal more effort, in all areas of School life.”  Ms. Hannah describes a plethora of new habits they have encouraged among faculty, students, parents, and vendors.  For example, parents are encouraged to send reusable containers rather than individually packaged snacks and drinks.  Teachers spend the extra time in the classroom disposing waste according to the guidelines.  And all of the schools vendors and personal had to adjust their procedures and the materials they use. 

 

“However, people are eager to do it, especially once they see how positively the children respond,” continued Ms. Hannah.  “Children are naturally compassionate and enthusiastic.  Extending that eagerness to the environment is both interesting and empowering for them. We draw our energy from them, like in all areas of school life.”

 

Highlights of the program include:

·      100% of energy used onsite is offset by renewable energy purchases.

·      Building energy efficiency ranks in the 90th percentile for similar buildings’ Energy Star ratings.

·      Food waste is diverted from landfill by on-site composting.

·      Rainwater is capture and used in the classroom garden and throughout the grounds.

·      Green materials, from carpet to paint, are used for all renovations.

·      Recycled office and school supplies are used.

·      Green cleaning supplies are used.

 

 

Pennington Montessori is a non-profit preschool in Pennington, New Jersey serving ages 15 months to six years.  Dedicated to the Montessori philosophy of education, PMS admits students of any race, color, nationality or ethnic origin. The school is incorporated in and licensed by, the State of New Jersey and affiliated with the American Montessori Society, a national accreditation and governing organization for schools teaching the Montessori philosophy

Valid from 07/26/2011 to 09/15/2011

Nassau Tennis Club Donates $3,000 to Montgomery First Responders

03/04/2015

Nassau Tennis Club’s 3rd Annual President’s Day Weekend Community Tournament to Benefit Montgomery First Responders was a huge success raising approximately $1500.  The Nassau Tennis Club matched donations and presented checks to the Montgomery EMS, Police Department, Fire Company #1 & #2. “Every year, the event grows bigger and we are able to acknowledge the great work of our local heroes,” says Benton Camper, “we hope to continue to grow the event year after year.” 

Valid from 03/04/2015 to 05/01/2015

John Witherspoon Middle School Mathletes Team Wins First Place

03/19/2015

On the Pi Day of the century, the John Witherspoon Middle School Mathletes team of Ben Qi, Theodore Ehrenborg, Lawrence Chen and Richard Qi took first place in the state Mathcounts competition.

 

Eight grader Ben Qi placed second individually in the competition and will compete, for the second year in a row, at the national level.  

 

JW teachers Matthew Sullivan and Alicia Perrine will coach the New Jersey team at the Mathcounts National Competition in Boston. Ben Qi and three other top-placing individuals from N.J. will be competing with the top teams from around the nation.  

Valid from 03/19/2015 to 05/01/2015

The Crucial First Ride

Authors: Ed Pavelka

www.RoadBikeRider.com

The Crucial First Ride

Make Sure a Newcomer Returns for a Second Ride!

By Ed Pavelka of www.RoadBikeRider.com

If you’ve been in this sport for long, you’ve probably seen it happen. An enthusiastic person shows up for his (or her) first ride with the local club. He’s a bit intimidated by the lingo he overhears, but that’s nothing compared to his anxiety about what to do and how to do it once the ride gets underway. Before long he’s trailing behind, spooked by the interplay of bike wheels and feeling as wanted as an IRS agent in a Super Bowl pool.

Do you think this guy will be back for another ride next weekend? Not likely.

It’s unfortunate, but experienced cyclists are often pretty tough on newcomers. It may be intentional because of the risks that an unskilled bike-handler creates for everyone, but more often it happens because we forget how much a novice cyclist doesn’t know. If you think about it, riding a bike isn’t all that easy.

Gero McGuffin has thought about it. She was 30 years old before she climbed onto a bike the first time, so she vividly recalls how intimidating beginning can be. Now a polished cyclist and the wife of cycling author Arnie Baker, M.D., Gero enjoys helping new riders get started in a way that ensures they’ll have a great time and come back for more.

Gero’s recommendations can be used anytime we’re riding with a newcomer. If you’re a beginning rider, these tips can help you have a more positive experience as you learn the sport.

Be Gentle

Gero’s core advice is useful when helping any new rider: “Treat them kindly, go slowly, and keep your expectations low. Give it your best shot, and you will help a person become a cyclist for the rest of their life.”

Now, here’s a digest of her specific tips.

  • Don’t project your own cycling goals. They are much different for an experienced rider compared to a new rider. Let the person evolve. If he’s interested only in casual cycling, let him be. If he’s interested in fast recreational riding or racing, encourage him – but explain the dangers of trying to advance too fast before developing a foundation of skills and fitness.
     

  • Take nothing for granted. Err on the side of proceeding too slowly and explaining too much. A new rider has lots of knowledge gaps.
     

  • Watch your language. If you’re saying things like “upshift one cog” or “feather the brakes,” a newcomer isn’t going to understand and may be too embarrassed to admit it.
     

  • Be polite. Even if made in jest, negative actions or comments can have a long-lasting impact.
     

  • Ask the person about his concerns. These could include fear of traffic, fear of being left behind, fear of riding close to others, fear of the saddle, and even fear of wearing form-fitting Lycra clothing. Then work with the person to resolve the specific worry.
     

  • Keep costs in perspective. Don’t make the person feel that he has to spend a lot of money to be a cyclist. Explain, however, that some things are a smart investment. For instance, if he’s in the market for a new bike, it should be the best quality he can afford. It should have a triple crankset for plenty of easy gears if there are hills in the area. He should buy a good saddle, cycling shorts with a padded liner and a helmet.
     

  • Simplify the pedals. New cyclists are often afraid of toe clips and straps or clipless pedals. It’s helpful to install platform pedals that don’t require any technique to enter or exit.
     

  • Check riding position. A newcomer will master pedaling and handling faster if he’s in a good position. Make sure there is a slight bend in his knees at the bottom of the pedal circle and that the handlebar is within an inch or so of saddle height. To really nail his position, use the guidelines in the RBR article, "How to Perfect Your Position and Technique."

Now We’re Rolling

  • Stay off the road. When helping a first-timer learn to ride, use a big sports field or empty parking lot. Keep traffic out of the equation. Next, try park paths or quiet residential streets.
     

  • Ride as slow as the beginner. Don’t do anything to make him go faster than his comfort level.
     

  • Watch his eyes. Remind a new cyclist that he’ll ride a smoother, straighter line if he looks 10 or more feet ahead rather than directly in front of the wheel.
     

  • Watch his grip. New riders are apt to be tense, locking their arms and squeezing the bar with white knuckles. Explain the advantages of flexed elbows and a secure but relaxed grip.
     

  • Take away a hand. After starting, stopping, and maintaining a straight line, the next skill to work on is riding with one hand. This is important so the person can signal or reach for his water bottle without swerving. Next, move on to shifting gears – how and when.
     

  • Keep it simple. Don’t overwhelm a newcomer with techniques. Let him get comfortable with the basics. As you see skill and confidence increase, add something new to work on.
     

  • Stay back. If you ride behind the person he won’t feel like he’s always trying to catch up. Let him set the pace. Don’t ride beside him until he feels confident in his basic riding ability.
     

  • Introduce drafting. Explain the advantages of riding behind a wheel, but let the newcomer keep a gap of several feet until he’s ready to move in closer.
     

  • Take a real ride. For your first ride in regular conditions, plan a course that has a fun place to stop at the halfway point. It could be a coffee shop or an ice cream parlor. This is a good chance to relax, give pointers, answer questions and provide encouragement.

Make It Good for You, Too

One problem: Too many rides like just described can take some of the fun out of cycling for you. Here is Gero’s advice for how an experienced rider can get some training while riding with a newcomer. She saw her husband use these techniques while he was helping her get started. Don’t do these things during the initial rides. Wait till the newcomer has basic skills but still lacks speed.

The stronger rider can…

  • stay in the same gear throughout the ride, spinning on downhills to work on leg speed and pedaling forcefully on climbs to build strength.
     

  • assist the new rider up hills with pushes (assuming traffic conditions allow and you have the skill to do this safely).
     

  • pedal with one leg at a time to benefit from the technique of isolated leg training.
     

  • sprint up the road or to the top of a hill and then ride back, or drop back and then sprint to catch up.

Way to Go!

After a ride, always congratulate the new cyclist on his progress and welcome comments. As Gero notes, “They will have questions that you can hardly imagine, because you have been cycling for so long.”

Finally, encourage the person to ride on his own between rides with you. This will give him the chance to practice skills and gain fitness with absolutely no pressure. Just make sure he doesn’t go off the deep end and turn cycling into a physical and mental chore. This can happen when enthusiasm causes a person to boost their riding too fast. Firmly recommend an increase in time or distance of about 10 percent per week, with at least two rest days.

(A portion of this material was adapted from the coaching manual for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, copyright 1999 by Arnie Baker, M.D.)

Receive a FREE copy of the eBook “29 Pro Cycling Secrets for Roadies” by subscribing to the RoadBikeRider Newsletter at www.RoadBikeRider.com. No cost or obligation!

[Back to top]
 

Valid from 07/23/2009

One Simple Wish's First Annual Awards Dinner, A Night of 1000 Wishes, September 24, 2011

08/16/2011

One Simple Wish is thrilled to invite you to join us as we honor foster children and our amazing supporters at our first annual awards dinner, A Night of 1000 Wishes, on Saturday, September 24th, 6pm at the Trenton War Memorial in Trenton, NJ.
 
Performances by ArtsYOUniversity's Movements of Grace Dance Team and the Darla Rich Band will entertain as our guests enjoy delicious food by Bitter Bob's of New Hope.

Our silent auction includes some incredible items such as an all inclusive 4 night trip to Aruba, David Yurman Jewelry, Golf at Jasna Polana, box seats to a 76ers game and much, much more.
 
Plus: Take a walk through our life-size Wish Garden and make some wishes come true!
 
$125 per ticket includes open bar.
 
For tickets, ads and more information, visit www.onesimplewish.org/1000 or contact us at info@onesimplewish.org or 609-883-8484.
 

Valid from 08/16/2011 to 09/25/2011

Monthly Megapass Offered to First Timers at PCYH

08/25/2011

First-time visitors to Princeton Yoga can also purchase a monthly Megapass for $99 providing unlimited access to regularly scheduled classes. Current members may also qualify for this offer if they bring a friend who signs up for the Megapass. 

Serving the greater Princeton area for 15 years this September, Princeton Yoga offers the largest variety of classes in the area, including therapeutically oriented programs and popular daily classes like Hatha Yoga, Hot Yoga, Power/Ashtanga Yoga, Kripalu Yoga, Gentle Yoga, Vinyasa Yoga, Pre and Post Natal Yoga, Therapeutic/Restorative Yoga, teacher trainings and a packed schedule of workshops and events.

 

Princeton Center for Yoga & Health

Montgomery Professional Center

50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506

Skillman, NJ  08558

(609) 924-PCYH

www.princetonyoga.com

 





Valid from 08/25/2011 to 11/01/2011

New Diagnostic Criteria and Guidelines for Alzheimer’s Published for First Time in 27 Years

04/19/2011

New criteria and guidelines for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease have been published — for the first time in 27 years — by three expert workgroups spearheaded by the Alzheimer’s Association and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The workgroups published four articles including ready-to-use clinical diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer’s disease dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer’s. A research agenda was proposed for preclinical Alzheimer’s. The use of biomarkers in Alzheimer’s dementia and MCI due to Alzheimer’s was also proposed as a research agenda only, and is not intended for application in clinical settings at this time.

The articles — collectively, the National Institute on Aging/Alzheimer’s Association Diagnostic Guidelines for Alzheimer’s Disease — expand the definition of Alzheimer’s to include two new phases of the disease: (1) presymptomatic and (2) mildly symptomatic but pre-dementia, along with (3) dementia caused by Alzheimer’s. This reflects current thinking that Alzheimer’s begins creating distinct and measurable changes in the brains of affected people years, perhaps decades, before memory and thinking symptoms are noticeable.

“It is our hope that incorporating scientific knowledge gained and technological advances made over the past quarter century will improve current diagnosis, bring the field closer to earlier detection and treatment and, ultimately, lead to effective disease-modifying therapies,” said William Thies, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association chief medical and scientific officer. “Development and publication of these articles is a major landmark in the field. That said, publication of these articles is not yet the end of the process of developing new diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer’s, but is another major step in the process.”

“The new guidelines reflect today’s understanding of how key changes in the brain lead to Alzheimer’s disease pathology and how they relate to the clinical signs of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease dementia,” said Creighton Phelps, Ph.D., program director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Centers Program at the National Institutes of Health. “We are also beginning to be able to detect these changes at a preclinical stage, long before symptoms appear in many people. With further research on biomarkers, as set forth in the new guidelines, we may ultimately be able to predict who is at risk for development of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s dementia, and who would benefit most as interventions are developed.”

The proposed new Alzheimer’s disease diagnostic guidelines were published online today by Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association. Hard copy publication is scheduled for the May 2011 issue.

To learn more, visit www.alz.org/research/diagnostic_criteria.

National Institute on Aging (NIA)
NIA, part of the National Institutes of Health, a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, leads the federal government effort conducting and supporting research on aging and the health and well being of older people. For information on age-related cognitive change and neurodegenerative disease, go to the NIA’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center at www.nia.nih.gov/Alzheimers. For more on health and on aging generally, go to www.nih.nia.gov. Media contact is Peggy Vaughn, Office of Communications and Public Liaison, at 301.496.1752 or mnianews3@mail.nih.gov.

Alzheimer's Association

The Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's. For more information, visit

www.alz.org

.


Contact: Alzheimer's Association


Media line: 312.335.4078


E-mail:

mailto:media@alz.org

Valid from 04/19/2011 to 07/01/2011

Princeton Blairstown Center Wins Support for Trenton’s Rivera Students

05/21/2015

Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation Provides Grant

 

PRINCETON, NJ, May 20, 2015 – The Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) today announced it has received a $10,000 grant from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation in support of the STEM-based activities in its Social Emotional Learning Program for Rivera Middle School students in Trenton.

 

The Princeton-Blairstown Center, originally a camp run by Princeton University students to give inner-city boys a character-building fresh air experience, evolved into a variety of year-round, multi-service, youth development experiential education programs serving over 5,200 students from the Mid-Atlantic States.  In addition to Rivera Middle School in Trenton, PBC runs programs at Trenton Central High West Campus and at the Global Neighborhood Secondary School in New York City.

 

The PBC programs at Rivera are innovative dropout prevention programs, led by a Masters-level social worker, hat teach students critical social-emotional skills like self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and healthy decision making.  PBC’s approach combines practical applications in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), critical thinking skills, social and emotional growth, and leadership development.  The structured program provides 76 students with positive peer support to make healthy choices, problem solve, delay gratification and set goals.  The group also works on communications skills, focus, and resiliency.

 

“This generous gift from Bristol-Myers Squibb will allow PBC to provide a STEM-based gardening project that will take place at Rivera as well as a five day-four night July trip to PBC’s Blairstown Campus”, said Pam Gregory, Executive Director.  “Imagine growing up in Trenton without a backyard and being able to hike and explore 264 acres of pristine woodlands and swim and wade in Bass Lake and Blair Creek. Students will learn about ecology and wildlife and see their first stars away from city lights.  For many Trenton students it is a first!” The program focuses on decreasing summer learning loss by providing three hours of daily environmental education, literacy and integrated language arts instruction along with the social-emotional and leadership skills learned from the challenge and ropes courses that students can transfer back to school and family life.

 

About the Princeton-Blairstown Center
 

PBC is an independent nonprofit with a mission to transform the lives of vulnerable young people through integrated experiential and adventure-based programming in schools and at our Blairstown Campus near the Delaware Water Gap.  We collaborate with schools, university partners, and community-based agencies to develop in youth deepened self-awareness, responsible decision-making, teamwork, and leadership skills.   Our wide variety of year-round, multi-service programs serve over 5,200 students from the Mid-Atlantic States.  

 

Valid from 05/21/2015 to 07/30/2015

First Annual YPH Charity Benefit Supporting the Diabetes Foundation September 22, 2011

09/08/2011

 
You are cordially invited to attend the First Annual YPH Charity Benefit supporting the Diabetes Foundation. Please join us for a three course meal and silent auction at the private room of New York Times top rated restaurant Due Mari. Roberta Schmidt, Executive Director of the Diabetes foundation, will present the mission and accomplishments of the foundation. Cocktail attire is required.
 
Date: Thursday, September 22nd
Time: 7:00 pm-10:00 pm
Location: Due Mari Pesce E Vinoteca
78 Albany Street New Brunswick, NJ 08901
 
Ticket Prices: 
 
Early Bird Special: $75 (First 10 attendees)
YPH Member:  $85

100% of the proceeds will be donated to the Diabetes Foundation
   
To reserve a spot, please RSVP by clicking on the PayPal link below:
 
 
Parking availability: 
 
Street parking available on Somerset Street/Hamilton Street/Easton Avenue and George Street
Garage parking available at the Ferren Mall Parking deck on 180 Church Street, New Brunswick, New Jersey
 
Please address all questions and concerns to elina@yphprinceton.com

Diabetes Foundation: 
 
The Diabetes Foundation, Inc., established on August 17th 1990, is a 501(c)(3) non-for-profit organization dedicated to the needs of the diabetic community in the New Jersey/New York Metropolitan area. Through the efforts of volunteers, the Diabetes Foundation, Inc. focuses its efforts on providing public and professional education, diabetic children's camp scholarships, and indigent assistance with diabetic medications and supplies in an effort to improve the quality of life for people with diabetes. For more information, please visit their website http://diabetesinnj.org

Valid from 09/08/2011 to 09/23/2011

Artists Arakawa and Herzfeld Featured in First 2011-12 MCCC Gallery Show

09/02/2011

The Gallery at Mercer County Community College will open its 2011-12 season with “Motus Anima: Works by Peter Arakawa and Rita Herzfeld” Tuesday, Sept. 13 to Thursday, Oct. 20.  The public is invited to a reception with the artists on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 5 - 7:30 p.m., and to a Gallery Talk with the artists Monday, Oct. 3, starting at 7 p.m.  The MCCC Gallery is located on the second floor of the Communication Building on Mercer's West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road.

 

“The title of the show, Motus Anima, is a Latin phrase that means, essentially, ‘movement of the spirit,’ which I think speaks to the essence and energy of this work,” says Tricia Fagan, Gallery director and curator. The exhibit features paintings, prints and collage works by both artists.  According to Fagan, Herzfeld’s gestural acrylics and exuberant watercolor abstracts are alive with color and motion, while Arakawa’s intricate works explore his unique cartography of surface, material and mark-making. Fagan predicts that the visual excitement of these artists’ works will have visitors discovering something new each time they view the exhibit.

 

Peter Arakawa studied art at Rutgers University, earning both his B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees from the Mason Gross School of the Arts. He has taught art throughout the state, most recently at Middlesex Community College and Raritan Valley Community College. He is a 1994 Pollock/Krasner Foundation Fellow and a 2003 Brodsky Center Printmaking Fellow.  His work is in many public and private collections including The New Jersey State Museum, the Hunterdon Museum of Art, the Newark Public Library and the headquarters of Johnson & Johnson Corporation.

 

Rita Herzfeld, a New York City native, received her B.A. from Rutgers University, and continued her art studies at the Art Students’ League, the School of Visual Arts and City College (NYC).  Her work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions in gallery and corporate art spaces throughout the metropolitan area. Her work is in several permanent collections, including the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum and the Hunterdon Museum of Art.

 

Gallery hours for the fall semester are: Tuesdays, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.; Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. and 6 – 8 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. and 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. For more information, call the Gallery at 609-570-3589 or visit the college’s website at www.mccc.edu/gallery.

Valid from 09/02/2011 to 10/21/2011

DOE Approves NJ's First Mandarin-Immersion Charter School For Princeton, South Brunswick, & West Windsor-Plainsboro

01/21/2010

Princeton, New Jersey, January 12, 2010 – The New Jersey Department of Education approved the application for a new charter elementary school to open in September, 2010.

Princeton International Academy Charter School (PIACS) will serve the Princeton Regional, South Brunswick, and West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional school districts.  PIACS will be the first public school in New Jersey to teach students through Mandarin-English dual language immersion and the first public school in greater Princeton to educate students through the International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum framework.

“The Department of Education under Commissioner Lucille Davy’s leadership continues to be steadfast in its efforts to provide New Jersey children with the skills they need to be successful in a changing global environment,” said Dr. Bonnie Liao, the lead founder of PIACS.  “The founders of PIACS are grateful for this opportunity and determined to help our children tackle 21st Century challenges with fluency in two world languages through immersion and the International Baccalaureate curriculum framework to meet the highest education standards.”

In the letter of approval, PIACS was approved based on the strengths of its implementation and financial plans. Commissioner Davy stated the “application presents a strong research-based case for a language-immersion charter school in the districts identified.” 

New Jersey will join Massachusetts, Colorado, California, Oregon, and Minnesota as states with a public school curriculum taught through Mandarin-English dual language immersion. “We are very pleased that the parents and students in the Princeton, West Windsor-Plainsboro, and South Brunswick school districts will have a choice in elementary education that includes International Baccalaureate and dual language immersion education,” said co-founder and South Brunswick resident Melissa Edwards. “Our school districts are among the best in the country. The addition of PIACS is instrumental for maintaining this leadership in future decades.”

“PIACS enrollment is open to students of all ethnic, racial, cultural, and linguistic identities and we welcome the chance for community members to learn more at one of the upcoming PIACS information sessions or via our website,” said co-founder and Plainsboro resident Dr. Stuart Chen-Hayes. The initial recruitment and application period will end on February 6, 2010, at which point, students who have applied will be admitted through a lottery system.

For the 2010-2011 academic year, PIACS offers Kindergarten through 2nd grade classes with a new grade added annually thereafter. For more information about the benefits of PIACS, dual language immersion, International Baccalaureate, enrollment applications, and upcoming information sessions, visit www.piacs.org.

Valid from 01/21/2010 to 04/21/2010

Sustainable Princeton's First Annual Municipal Green Report

04/21/2011

Sustainable Princeton's first annual Muinicipal Green Report detailing actions taken by both the Borough and Township to address the goals laid out in the Sustainable Princeton Community plan.   

Valid from 04/21/2011 to 07/01/2011

Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce Announces First Annual Healthcare Symposium November 9, 2011

10/27/2011

Register Online!

Flyer - Oct 27

 

 

 

Valid from 10/27/2011 to 11/10/2011

2011 Beaujolais Nouveau PRE-SALE First Come, First Serve - Princeton Corkscrew

11/14/2011

It's That Time Again 
Beaujolais Nouveau
With the 2011 vintage of BOJO looking to be a classic, the Corkscrew is excited for the arrival of Domaine Haut Lambert's Beaujolais Nouveau. The 2011 is a high quality vintage that shows lush berry fruit, firm structure and fine silky tannins.  

We are proud to offer 56 cases of BOJO at the fantastic price of $13.50 per bottle.  Starting today, the 2011 BOJO will be offered as a PRE-SALE. The wine arrives in our shop Thursday, November 17th and will be available for pick-up at 10am. This wine is sold on a first come, first serve basis. Please have your credit card ready upon order, as reservations without payment will not be accepted.  

Join the celebration and sip on this wonderful tradition!

Santé!

Laurent

2011 Domaine Haut Lambert Beaujolais Nouveau                       $13.50    add to cart
 
($12.15 on 12 or more/$145.80 per case = SAVE $16.20)
Princeton Corkscrew Wine Shop | 609.430.1200 | 49 Hulfish Street | Princeton | NJ | 08542
 

Valid from 11/14/2011 to 11/30/2011

Sinfonietta Nova Holds First Youth Concerto Competition

12/04/2011

Sinfonietta Nova is proud to announce its First Youth Concerto Competition for New Jersey musicians up to 18 years of age. The top two winners will have the opportunity of performing the concerto with full orchestra at Sinfonietta Nova’s upcoming March 3, 2012 family concert. The fist-place winner will receive a $250 scholarship.

   The Concerto Competition is open to all orchestral instruments, excluding piano. To enter, musicians must send a CD or MP3 recording to Sinfonietta Nova, 40 Honeyflower Lane, West Windsor, NJ 08550 along with the application form (which can be found at sinfoniettanova.org) and $25 application fee. Recordings may also be e-mailed to auditions@sinfoniettanova.org. All recordings and application materials must be postmarked or e-mailed by December 31, 2011. Fifteen finalists will be notified by January 13, 2012 regarding the in-person audition, which will be held in West Windsor, NJ on January 22, 2012.

   Please visit www.sinfoniettanova.org or call Barbara Weinfield at 609-462-4984 for more information on the competition as well as the March 2012 concert

Valid from 12/04/2011 to 12/31/2011

Princeton Art Organizations Join to Present the First Princeton ArtWalk November 3, 2011

10/17/2011

The inaugural Princeton ArtWalk, the first in a series of Thursday evenings highlighting the rich array of visual arts resources available in downtown Princeton, will be held November 3, 2011 from 5 to 8pm. During the ArtWalk, ten visual arts institutions, anchored by the Princeton University Art Museum and the Arts Council of Princeton, will be open to the public free of charge. Scheduled to be held on a quarterly basis, the Princeton ArtWalk is meant to encourage campus and community to sample the visual arts-related events and activities offered at these local institutions, as well as music, entertainment, and refreshments. The destinations include: the Princeton University Art Museum, the Arts Council of Princeton, the Bernstein Gallery, the Woodrow Wilson School, Firestone Library, the Lewis Center for the Arts, Historic Morven, the Princeton Historical Society, the Princeton Public Library, Labyrinth Books, and small world coffee.

Princeton area arts organizations have a long history of successful collaborations.  Beginning with the Princeton Area Arts and Culture Consortium, founded in 2005, to the current community-wide collaboration “Memory and the Work of Art,” arts organizations have come

together to create meaningful and engaging community experiences through the arts.

The Princeton ArtWalk began through a series of conversations between the Princeton University Art Museum, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Princeton University Library. A total of ten organizations including both non-profit and for-profit organizations on and off campus have joined to introduce visitors to the rich array of visual arts opportunities available in downtown Princeton within easy walking distance.

“We’re excited to continue deepening the ties between a wide range of organizations committed to the visual arts in downtown Princeton,” said Museum Director James Steward, “to reinforce the fact that this is a community that embraces and supports the arts, and to welcome a range of visitors to discover the range of offerings regularly available at these ten great venues.”

The Princeton ArtWalk is made possible in part by the Princeton University Office of Community and Regional Affairs, the Princeton Area Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Nassau Inn.

Parking in downtown Princeton is conveniently located in parking garages located on Spring, Chambers and Hulfish Streets. Details of the inaugural Princeton ArtWalk can be found at https://www.facebook.com/princetonartwalk.

 

 

Valid from 10/17/2011 to 11/04/2011

Hunterdon Medical Center Welcomes First Baby of New Year

01/04/2012

Amanda and Raymond McCarthy of High Bridge, are the proud parents of
Liam Daniel McCarthy who was born at 8:39am on January 1st, 2012 at
Hunterdon Medical Center.  Dr. Drew Farber, M.D. of Premier Obstetrics
and Gynecology of Hunterdon delivered Liam who weighed 6 pounds and15
ounces and is 20 inches long.   Baby Liam receives a hand knitted
blanket donated by Hunterdon Medical Center volunteer, Pat Quinlan and a
special knitted hat with a star on it donated by Mary Viola.   In
addition, the first child born each year receives a star engraved with
their name and birth date on the “Star is Born” mural outside the
Maternity and Newborn Care Center donated by the Hunterdon Medical
Center Foundation.   Liam shares this special birthday with his paternal
Grandmother, Patricia who also celebrates her birthday on New Year’s
Day.

Pictured: (Left to Right) Proud Grandmother Patricia McCarthy, Parents
Amanda, holding Liam and Raymond McCarthy.

Valid from 01/04/2012 to 02/15/2012

Students at St. Paul Catholic School of Princeton Create Adirondack Chairs for Auction

01/24/2012

True Works of Art! Students from St. Paul Catholic School of Princeton add their creative touches to a school-wide art project—creating unique Adirondack chairs. Each class selected a theme (think beach, travel, gardens, weather) and painted their chair for the school's annual fund-raising auction. Shown here: 4th graders Anna Sarubbi (Hillsborough), Faythe Endres (Princeton) and Matthew Ramos (East Windsor) working on their "busy-bee"-themed chair. These works of art will be auctioned off at St. Paul's Shamrock Auction on March 10th.


Valid from 01/24/2012 to 03/01/2012

Welcome to the ’60s as MCCC Theatre Program Presents “Hairspray”

03/13/2012

Buckle your seat belts for a ride back to 1960s Baltimore when hairdos were high and the music was boppin’.  Join Mercer County Community College Theatre students, community actors from the James Tolin Memorial Fund (JTMF), and several other community actors for the unforgettable musical “Hairspray” at MCCC’s Kelsey Theatre.  Dates and times for this colorful comedy are Friday, April 13 at 8 p.m.; Saturdays, April 14 and 21 at 8 p.m.; and Sundays, April 15 and 22 at 2 p.m. Kelsey Theatre is located on Mercer's West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. A reception with the cast and crew follows the opening night performance on April 13.

Tracy Turnblad is the lovable, plus-size heroine with a passion for dancing.  When she gets the chance to audition for a spot on a local TV dance program with teenage heart throb Link Larkin, she thinks her dream has come true.  But Amber Von Tussle, the program’s reigning princess, has other plans.  Can the endearing, good-natured Tracy win a spot on the show and the heart of her crush, while also breaking down the barriers between the races?  Find out in this hair-raising performance filled with music and dance numbers the entire family can enjoy! 

According to MCCC Theatre/Dance Program Coordinator Jody Person, Theatre students will be working with JTMF for the first time.  “It’s a great experience for our students to work with experienced community actors.”  He adds that this is a large cast so there will be opportunities for many actors to show off their talents, and the cast, with its varying ages, will provide a better reflection of the real show, with adults playing the adult roles and students playing the roles of the young dance enthusiasts.

JTMF was eager to collaborate with MCCC students on the project, Person said.  “They are a small, but committed group that performs every year at Kelsey Theatre as a fundraiser in memory of MCCC alumnus James Tolin, who died of AIDS.  The group awards two scholarships to MCCC Theatre students each year.  Now they are taking that relationship further by working with our students.  It’s a big musical that reflects JTMF’s mission of appreciating and respecting diversity.”   

Cast members include: Kristan Kane of Plainsboro as Tracy Turnblad; Ethan Daniel Levy of Plainsboro as Corny Collins; Brian Bara of Levittown, Pa., as Edna; Megan Sherow of Millstone as Penny Pingleton; Vicky Wyman of Monroe Township as Velma Von Tussle; Shannon Brueckner of Jackson as Amber Von Tussle; Ben Menahem of Plainsboro as Link Larkin; and Tommy Thomas of Georgetown, England, as Seaweed Stubbs.

Other cast members are: Domonique Jarrett of East Windsor as Little Inez; Taylor Pickett Stokes of Trenton as Motormouth Maybelle; Tom Orr of Ewing as Wilbur Turnblad; Melissa Kettner of Bordentown as Prudy Pingleton; Jon Cintron of Trenton as Harriman F. Spritzer; Adiin Clemons of Trenton as Stooie; Nilah Montgomery of Princeton as Cindy Watkins; Theodoria Rovira of Hamilton as Lorraine; and Maleek Colvin of Trenton as Duane. 

Featured in the ensemble are: Kim Guillaume of Hamilton, Nicole Erkoboni of Lawrenceville, Chris DiTullio of Lawrenceville, Alexandra Baldwin of Lawrenceville, Parker Harris of Lawrenceville, Dan Johnson of Ewing, Sabella Lichtman of Monroe Township, Julia Procaccino of Yardley, Pa., Meredith Bleemer of Oreland, Pa., Amariss White of Trenton, Rachel Garretson of Cranbury, Jeni Starinksy of East Brunswick, and Stephanie Ortiz of Lawrenceville.

The show is directed by Jeremy Robinson, an MCCC adjunct professor who teaches musical theatre, with choreography by Person and stage management by Kelsey’s own Tracy Antozzeski.  Mercer’s Entertainment Technology students will provide lighting and sound under the direction of Program Coordinator Robert Terrano.  For the first time, these students will do video projection work to set the scene of historic Baltimore. 

Tickets are $18 for adults, $16 for seniors, and $14 for students and children. Tickets may be purchased by calling the Kelsey Theatre box office at 609-570-3333, or online at www.kelseytheatre.net.  Kelsey Theatre is wheelchair accessible, with free parking next to the theater.

Valid from 03/13/2012 to 04/23/2012

Pennington Montessori Awarded Silver LEED Certification First School in New Jersey

03/21/2012

 

Pennington, NJ - Pennington Montessori School earns Silver LEED-EB Certification this June.  The certification was awarded by the United States Green Council, and makes Pennington Montessori the first School in New Jersey to transform its entire campus, existing buildings, to a Silver Leed Certified Operation. 

 

The School has been working with the Council for more than a year to meet the strict criteria for Silver LEED-EB status.  The implications affect every area of the School from cleaning supplies and maintenance materials to classroom habits and office procedures. The certification reflects a School-wide commitment to sustainability. 

 

According to USGBC, there are only six other school’s nationally, which have earned the Silver LEED-EB Certification. 

 

A green curriculum includes on-site gardening and composting lessons.  “The faculty and students are eager to participate in our sustainability initiatives and goals,” explains Director Kathleen Hannah.  “Thanks to the commitment shown by the faculty, the students are really absorbing the concepts and their power to impact the environment.”

 

“It requires a great deal more effort, in all areas of School life.”  Ms. Hannah describes a plethora of new habits they have encouraged among faculty, students, parents, and vendors.  For example, parents are encouraged to send reusable containers rather than individually packaged snacks and drinks.  Teachers spend the extra time in the classroom disposing waste according to the guidelines.  And all of the schools vendors and personal had to adjust their procedures and the materials they use. 

 

“However, people are eager to do it, especially once they see how positively the children respond,” continued Ms. Hannah.  “Children are naturally compassionate and enthusiastic.  Extending that eagerness to the environment is both interesting and empowering for them. We draw our energy from them, like in all areas of school life.”

 

Highlights of the program include:

·      100% of energy used onsite is offset by renewable energy purchases.

·      Building energy efficiency ranks in the 90th percentile for similar buildings’ Energy Star ratings.

·      Food waste is diverted from landfill by on-site composting.

·      Rainwater is capture and used in the classroom garden and throughout the grounds.

·      Green materials, from carpet to paint, are used for all renovations.

·      Recycled office and school supplies are used.

·      Green cleaning supplies are used.

 

 

Pennington Montessori is a non-profit preschool in Pennington, New Jersey serving ages 18 months to six years.  Dedicated to the Montessori philosophy of education, PMS admits students of any race, color, nationality or ethnic origin. The school is incorporated in and licensed by, the State of New Jersey and affiliated with the American Montessori Society, a national accreditation and governing organization for schools teaching the Montessori philosophy

Valid from 03/21/2012 to 05/01/2012

Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart Presents: Hairspray, The Broadway Musical

02/21/2012

Welcome to the 60’s: This decade was perhaps one of the most controversial and change oriented in the history of the United States. This seemingly fun loving musical explores prejudice in many forms. Hairspray is a delightful musical but it should be viewed with Parental discretion for children under 12. Hairspray show times are Friday, February 24 at 7:15PM and Saturday, February 25 at 2:00 and 7:15PM. Tickets are $12 for students and $15 for adults and can be purchased online or at the door. For more information visit www.stuartschool.org.




Valid from 02/21/2012 to 02/26/2012

PHS Studio Band Places First in State Championships

05/01/2012

The PHS Studio Band placed first at the state championships of the New Jersey Association for Jazz Education (NJAJE) on Saturday, April 28, 2012.  

In addition, the PHS Jazz Ensemble placed fourth, their highest finish at states.  

Under the leadership of band directors Joe Bongiovi and Scott Grimaldi, individual band members also were recognized with outstanding soloist awards the soloist award honoring a senior with a $1000 scholarship.  

NJAJE provides leadership, dedication and creative instruction to students involved in the jazz genre. The group organizes Regional and All State Jazz Ensembles, the statewide Honors Jazz Choir, the New Jersey State Jazz Festival, the New Jersey State Jazz Combo Festival, the New Jersey Intercollegiate Jazz Ensemble and the New Jersey State Jazz Conference.

For more information, please contact Pat Lenihan, supervisor of Visual and Performing Arts at patrick_lenihan@monet.prs.k12.nj.us

Valid from 05/01/2012 to 06/15/2012

First Year Anniversary Party at Milk Money May 2, 2012

05/01/2012

Valid from 05/01/2012 to 05/03/2012

D&R Greenway Land Trust Invites the Public to “The Upstairs / Downstairs Earth Ball” May 18, 2012

05/07/2012

 

D&R Greenway Land Trust invites the public to their Upstairs / Downstairs Earth Ball on Friday Evening, May 18, from 6:30 to 11:00 p.m.  This fourth annual country-themed fundraiser will be hosted by Emily and Johan Firmenich at their home, Eastbrook Farm.  This year’s unique venue provides for “upstairs” views from the pool house deck overlooking preserved landscape; and “downstairs” fun with cocktails and dancing under the stars.  2012’s Earth Ball cocktail will be “TGISpring.”

 

Denim is in order for this country chic event. Guests will dance to Bill Flemer’s “Riverside Bluegrass Band.” 

 

Individual tickets are available from $125 per person, by Friday May 11.  To arrange tickets and receive directions, contact Deb Kilmer at D&R Greenway: 609-924-4646, or e-mail: dkilmer@drgreenway.org. 

 

Dinner will feature fresh, local foods from Hopewell’s legendary Double Brook Farm, Cherry Grove and other area farms, prepared by The Catering Company.  Princeton Day School is providing off-site parking, off the Great Road, with continuous shuttle to the event.  Other local supporters include Trader Joe’s, McCaffrey’s Market, Lucy’s Ravioli Kitchen, Camden Bag & Paper, Joe Canal’s Discount Liquor Market, and xxx

 

Committee Co-Chairs, Emily Firmenich and Robin McConaughy, enthusiastically share their motivation for co-creating this unique Upstairs-Downstairs-at-Eastbrook event for the land trust.  “D&R Greenway has emerged as one of the most effective land conservation organizations in the State of New Jersey.  We believe they effectively make our community a place where we want to live and work.  For every dollar in operating support D&R Greenway received last year, they protected more than $6.60 in land value.  That kind of leverage is something we feel good about – in addition to the satisfaction we get every time we drive past a D&R Greenway preserve.”

 

This annual fund-raising event supports the important work of D&R Greenway to preserve and care for lands here in our community.  The ever-expanding attendee population is increasingly connected to the land, not only at the Upstairs / Downstairs Earth Ball, but also through trail walks, art exhibitions and linked scientific and environmental programs at the land trust’s Johnson Education Center off Rosedale Road in Princeton.

 

BACKGROUND

 

D&R Greenway Land Trust:  Founded in 1989, D&R Greenway Land Trust is one of New Jersey’s leading land preservation organizations.  Its mission is to preserve and provide stewardship for over 22 square miles of natural and agricultural land and historic landscapes in beleaguered New Jersey.   www.drgreenway.org

Valid from 05/07/2012 to 05/19/2012

University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro to Welcome First Patients Tuesday, May 22

05/21/2012

University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro (UMCPP) will welcome its first patients on Tuesday, May 22, marking the official opening of the new hospital.

Medical teams will transfer approximately 100 current patients from the University Medical Center at Princeton to the new hospital via ambulance. 

Princeton HealthCare System (PHCS) President and CEO Barry Rabner will be present to greet patients at the new $522.7 million hospital, which broke ground in October 2008. 

Designed by some of the world's leading architects, designers, health planners and engineers—with significant input from physicians, nurses, other caregivers and patients—the new UMCPP is among the most technologically advanced, patient-centered and environmentally friendly hospitals in the country.

From the overall layout of the 636,000-square-foot building down to the smallest details in all 231 single patient rooms, every investment and design decision was evaluated on its ability to promote healing, comfort and safety.
 

WHAT:  University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro to welcome first patients to new hospital 
WHO: Barry Rabner, President and CEO, PHCS 
Mark Jones, President, UMCPP 
Physicians, nurses, staff 
Approximately 100 patients 
WHEN: 7 a.m. 
Tuesday, May 22 
WHERE: University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro
One Plainsboro Road (off of Route 1 North)
Plainsboro, N.J. 

Valid from 05/21/2012 to 05/23/2012

University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro Welcomes First Patients to New Hospital

05/23/2012

PLAINSBORO, N.J. (May 22, 2012) – University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro (UMCPP) today welcomed its first patients, marking the official opening of the new hospital.

Over a period of seven hours, medical teams transferred 110 patients from the University Medical Center at Princeton to the new hospital via ambulance.

“The new University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro is officially open,” said Barry Rabner, president and CEO of Princeton HealthCare System. “Our organization and the community we serve has been focused on this day for nine years. We could not be more proud, more excited and more optimistic about our opportunity to provide outstanding health care in the future. I commend our staff, the emergency medical technicians and paramedics, police officers and the entire community for their help with the move."

Rabner along with Mark Jones, president of UMCPP, greeted patients as they were wheeled through the doors to the new hospital and up to their patient rooms.

“We have been planning and practicing for this move for more than a year,” said Jones. “Our goal was to keep our patients and their families safe and comfortable throughout the transition. We are pleased that the move went very smoothly."

The new $522.7 million hospital, which broke ground in October 2008, officially opened at 7 a.m. today.

Within nine hours after it opened, the hospital had treated 65 patients in the Emergency Department, six patients were admitted, two babies were born and a surgeon completed an unplanned surgery in one of the new operating rooms. 

Designed by some of the world's leading architects, designers, health planners and engineers – with significant input from physicians, nurses, other caregivers and patients – the new UMCPP is among the most technologically advanced, patient-centered and environmentally friendly hospitals in the country.
From the overall layout of the 636,000-square-foot building down to the smallest details in all 231 single patient rooms, every investment and design decision was evaluated on its ability to promote healing, comfort and safety.

The new hospital replaces the University Medical Center of Princeton, which opened in 1919 on Witherspoon Street in Princeton.

“The new UMCPP is a hospital designed and built for the 21st century,” said Rabner. “Our patients and their families will receive outstanding clinical care in a modern environment focused on healing.”

Photos from today's move are available here. [Caption information is below]

About University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro
A unit of Princeton HealthCare System, University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro opened in May 2012 as the hub of a 171-acre health campus in Plainsboro, N.J. UMCPP was designed by world-class architects using input from physicians, staff, and the community, as well as the results of more than 1,200 research studies to ensure that every aspect of the hospital helps to create an environment promoting safe, exceptional care. The hospital was accepted as a member of the prestigious Pebble Project, a research initiative founded by The Center for Health Design.
UMCPP a University Hospital Affiliate of the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey—Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, a Clinical Research Affiliate of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, an accredited oncology-teaching program of the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer (CoC) and recipient of the CoC’s Outstanding Achievement Award. Through a partnership with The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), UMCPP offers enhanced pediatric services, with CHOP physicians working onsite to provide pediatric emergency consultation, inpatient pediatric care and neonatal care.

For more information, visit www.princetonhcs.org.

Valid from 05/23/2012 to 07/01/2012

Rescue Mission Hosts First Ever Senior Executive Council

09/24/2012

On September 19, 2012 the Rescue Mission of Trenton hosted the inaugural meeting of the Mission’s Senior Executive Council.  Through the Senior Executive Council the Rescue Mission has brought together a diverse group of business and community leaders for the purpose of providing the Mission with input, insight, advice and counsel regarding future programs and strategic initiatives.

At the September 19th meeting the group was introduced to the Rescue Mission and its long history. Illyas, a Rescue Mission resident, shared his experience and his journey from an Emergency Shelter client, struggling with homelessness and drug addiction, to Rescue Mission resident seeking treatment for his substance abuse and working towards having a “normal life.” There was not a dry in the room as Illyas described his struggle and his gratitude that there was a place in the community where he could turn for help.

The Rescue Mission of Trenton is the Mercer County area’s oldest nonprofit dedicated to serving the homeless, the hungry, the transient and the addicted. More than 21% its funds come from the salvage and resale of household items, furniture and clothing and entrepreneurial activities and about 15% from individual, foundations, and corporate support. We could not carryout our mission if we did not have these funding sources.

Recently as a result of the severe downturn in the economy and a variety of other factors the income that the Mission has been able to generate from its industrial salvage operation has declining. This is one of the primary reasons we have assembled the Senior Executive Council (SEC). 

“We see this entity, composed of some of the best and brightest minds in Mercer County, as a vehicle for providing outside input and new ideas to the Board of Directors as we determine the future direction of the Mission. We are extremely gratified that such an incredible talented group of individuals have agreed to provide their years of wisdom to the Mission as it seeks to position it self to rebuild lives for years to come,” indicated Delia Dandridge, the President of the Board of Directors of the Rescue Mission of Trenton. 

The following are the specific responsibilities that the SEC, which will met twice a year, has been asked to perform on behalf of the Rescue Mission of Trenton:

 1. Provide the Mission with input, insight, advice and counsel regarding future programs and strategic initiatives.

 2. Help the Mission identify and attract individuals, corporations, groups/organizations and foundations that might be willing to provide assistance through philanthropic, professional, in-kind, or other means of direct support.

 3. Enhance the image of the Rescue Mission by encouraging others to take an interest in our mission. 

 At least two members of the Mission’s Board of Directors will attend each meeting of the SEC to insure that the important input and ideas expressed by the SEC are conveyed rapidly and directly to the Mission’s board of directors.

“The Mission is truly honored that the following diverse group of highly-respected leaders have agreed to serve on our first-ever SEC.  They are an extremely talented group drawn from education, government, foundations, the nonprofit sector, and private industry.  We are very proud that these exemplary citizens have agreed to lend their talents to the Mission,” indicated Mary Gay Abbott-Young, the Mission’s CEO.

The following individuals will be serving as founding members of the Mission’s SEC:

Dr. Sumeera Baig                             Physician

Anthony Destribats,  Esq.             Destribats & Campbell LLC

Linda Doherty                                    President, New Jersey Food Council

Peg Forrestal                                    Director of Contributions and Community Affairs

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Albin Garcia                                        President, Garcia Realtors

Leslee Geltzer                                   Geltzer Family Foundation

Harold “Chip” Jerry III, Esq.          Jerry & Jerry LLP

Lois Jessen                                          Director of Law and Promotion Integrity, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Anne LaBate                                      President, Segal Labate Commercial Real Estate

Randy Hanks                                      President & CEO, First Choice Bank

Katherine Hatton, Esq.                  VP General Counsel and Secretary

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Hon. Shing-Fu Hsueh,                    Mayor of West Windsor, Township of West Windsor

James Hyman                                    President and CEO, Hopewell Valley Community Bank

Phyllis Marchand                              Former Mayor, Princeton Township

James McManimon                        Business Administrator, Ewing Township

Diana McNeil                                     Regional Client Account Manager, ETS

Dvorit Samid                                      Vice President, Medical Affairs, Synta Pharmaceutical

Samin Sayed, Esq.,                          Samin Sayed, P.C.

David Shanks                                     Chief Executive Officer, Penguin Group (USA) Inc.

Patrick Sweeney                              President, Caliper Corporation

Dan Sweetser, Esq.                         Partner, Szaferman, Lakind, Blumstein & Blader, P.C.

Melanie Willoughby                        Senior Vice President

New Jersey Business & Industry Association

Karen Woodbridge                          Director of Community Relations, Princeton University

 

The Rescue Mission of Trenton works to serve people in need regardless of their financial or healthcare coverage situation through. Since the Rescue Mission’s founding in 1915 they have be the agency in the city of Trenton  that serves the truly needy men and women who have no place to turn for shelter, food, and clothing. The Mission door is always open for those in need, regardless of how many times they have been here before.

For more information about the Rescue Mission of Trenton, please visit www.rescuemissionoftrenton.org.

 

CONTACT:

Regan Mumolie

(609) 695-1436 x181

reganm@rmtrenton.org

 

Valid from 09/24/2012 to 10/31/2012

Boheme Opera NJ Presents First Return to Gounod’s FAUST since 1994

04/07/2013

Currently in its 24th Anniversary Season, Boheme Opera NJ, one of the State’s most enduring opera companies, is presenting a new production of Charles Gounod’s Faust, conducted and stage-directed by BONJ Artistic Director Joseph Pucciatti.  It is the first return for the company to one of opera’s most popular French romantic classics since 1994, when Boheme also premiered its English supertitles.

There will be two performances of this production – Saturday, April 20 at 7PM and Sunday, April 21 at 4PM, to take place in Kendall Main Stage Theater on the beautiful campus of The College of New Jersey in Ewing, NJ at its Center for the Arts, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, NJ  08628.  Returning as a backdrop for the action after last season’s success in The Magic Flute will be stunning virtual sets and original designs by J. Matthew Root.  For its audiences, Boheme returns with English Supertitles for this French-sung production, Pre-Curtain Talks one hour prior, and on-campus Special Needs Shuttle service.

Tickets range from student rate of $15 to adult pricing of $30, $40 and $50 which can be self-chosen. Tickets are easily obtained by going online at www.tcnj.edu/boxoffice, by phone at (609) 771-2775 or by in-person purchase at TCNJ’s Brower Student Center. TCNJ Box Office hours are Mon-Fri, 10am – 2pm and 6pm – 8pm.  An opening
night pre-opera dinner will take place at TCNJ’s 1855 Room with reservations being taken at (609) 581-9551.

Faust is the story of an aging scholar who upon contemplating suicide, inadvertently summons the devil and signs a contract to be transformed into a young man with far-reaching consequences.  Loosely based upon the Goethe tragedy of the same name, Gounod’s Faust is a work of beauty, temptation, passion and revelation.  For over 150 years, audiences have been flocking to the opera to hear its memorable tunes and to see its theatrical possibilities.

For this production, Boheme has assembled a veteran cast who will truly create vocal fireworks. In the title role is international tenor Daniel Snyder, who made his Boheme debut in 2011 as Cavaradossi in Tosca, noted as a dramatic performer of innate musicality and powerful presence. He has appeared throughout the United States, as well as Mexico and the Dominican Republic.  His recording work has taken him to Berlin and he has concertized in theaters and halls as far away as Mozambique, and as noted as the Seattle Symphony and Carnegie Hall.

Making his debut with Boheme in the role of Mephistopheles is veteran bass-baritone Frank Basile. Opera News declared him to be “a cross between Giorgio Tozzi and Ezio Pinza”.  After making his European debut in Turandot in Augsburg, Germany, he took a four-year position as soloist and singer with the United States Air Forces Singing Sergeants, frequently called upon to sing at the White House and for foreign heads of state as an official ambassador to the United States. Upon his departure from the Air Force, he continued his operatic career singing with houses such as the Metropolitan Opera, Baltimore Opera, Utah Opera, Nevada Opera and Sarasota Opera.

Returning after last season’s Boheme debut as an impressive Pamina in The Magic Flute, Seattle soprano Kristin K. Vogel sings her first Marguerite in this production.  Lauded for her powerful lyric voice, her control and her musicality, she has been heard for the past several seasons in principal opera and operetta roles at Natchez Festival of Music, Light Opera of New York and Opera Manhattan.  An eclectic artist of many eras of the vocal repertoire, she distinguished herself in Opera Scenes performance classes with Ken Merrill, and as “Cleopatra” in the Baroque Aria Ensemble production of Giulio Cesare.
                                           


A popular principal artist with Boheme Opera for over a decade, Met baritone Daniel Sutin returns for his first Valentin after his most recent role with the company as Baron Scarpia in its 2011 Tosca.  He has sung with the Metropolitan Opera for Wozzeck, Boris Godounov, Hansel and Gretel, Falstaff, Romeo et Juliette, Turandot and the world premiere of Tan Dun’s The First Emperor.  He has been featured in many principal roles across the country and abroad, with such notable companies as Royal Opera House Covent Garden, L’Opéra de Montréal, Canadian Opera Company, Lyric Opera of Chicago, The Reisopera in the Netherlands, Caramoor Festival, Michigan Opera Theater, San Antonio Opera, Santa Barbara Opera, Boston Lyric Opera, Spoleto Festival USA, Lincoln Center Festival and Savonlinna Opera Festival, among others.

The supporting pant role of Siebel will be sung by mezzo-soprano Jessica Renfro, last heard at Boheme Opera in the role of Hansel in its 2011 production of Hansel and Gretel.  Portraying Martha is area mezzo-soprano Susan Reinghans, last heard at Boheme Opera in the role of Flora in its 2007 production of La Traviata.  Area singer Jared Salwen will sing the role of Wagner.

Sponsors for Boheme Opera NJ’s Faust are New Jersey State Council on the Arts, Department of State, A Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts; Boheme Opera Guild, Inc., Roma Bank and NJM Insurance Group.

Next season, Boheme Opera NJ celebrates its milestone 25th consecutive anniversary season, which will highlight Giuseppe Verdi’s 200th Birthday with a huge festive Gala Concert and a fully-staged production of La Traviata.

_______________________________________________     
 

Valid from 04/07/2013 to 04/22/2013

Palmer Square Launches Two New Digital Products: Free App for iPhone and Andriod and First Issue of Online Magazine

04/10/2013

PRINCETON, NJ (April 9, 2013) – Palmer Square Management has recently released two new digital products that were designed to enhance the customer experience and help promote the uniqueness of the Square.


Free App for iphone and Android puts Palmer Square in the palm of your hand
.?  Locals and visitors alike will find the new Palmer Square App a convenient way to get information quickly about the stores, restaurants and events on the Square.  Also included is an ‘Exclusive Deals’ section.
“These deals are just for people who download the app and are scheduled to change monthly.” says Anita Fresolone, Marketing Director for Palmer Square. “The app is a useful tool and we look forward to its potential growth.”
       
The App includes the following features:


Shopping Directory?

From your favorite brand name stores to one-of-a-kind boutiques, Palmer Square offers something for everyone. 


Dining Directory ?

Whether you're looking for fine dining, a casual pub or a great cafe...we've got something to please your palette for breakfast, lunch and dinner.


Sales & Promotions?

Check out discounts, in-store events, trunk shows and more happening around the Square.


Event Calendar

?From summer concerts and a block party for kids to shopping nights and holiday festivities, Palmer Square hosts many events throughout the year.


Parking Info?

Two on-site garages make parking easy!


Hours?

Learn about the Square hours including which stores and restaurants open earlier or close later.


Exclusive Deals for App Users?

Download today and get access to exclusive offers from our stores and restaurants.


What’s New?

Get the latest updates from the Square.


Map?

Navigate your way around the Square.


Social Media?

Stay connected with us through Facebook and Twitter, plus join our email list.


PSq - Palmer Square Magazine - offers a closer look inside the Square.


Through beautiful photography, fact sheets, Q&A’s and much more, people will have the opportunity to experience Palmer Square like never before.
“We wanted to create something that captures the essence of the Square,” explains Palmer Square Marketing Director, Anita Fresolone. “Our goal was to convey to readers that we are ‘the’ destination for an exciting collection of stores and restaurants.  It was also a great opportunity to highlight a few store owners because they certainly are a big part of what makes the Square so special.” 
To view the magazine, click on front cover page.
      
 
Located across from Princeton University, Palmer Square boasts a unique collection of shopping and dining right in the heart of downtown Princeton, NJ. Experience charming classic architecture mixed with contemporary elements, while you stroll along the tree lined streets. You’ll find the best in apparel, shoes, jewelry, beauty, gifts, home furnishings and specialty food and drink. There are a selection of great restaurants, cafes and artisan ice cream shops, plus many seasonal events throughout the year.?www.palmersquare.com
For further information, please contact Anita Fresolone, Marketing Director at 609.921.2853 or afresolone@palmersquare.com.?

Valid from 04/10/2013 to 06/30/2013

Princeton Girlchoir's 2013 Spring Concerts

04/13/2013

PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY - Princeton Girlchoir's Spring Concerts promise to be an event filled with joy-the joy of hearing youthful voices sing about spring and the joy of choristers making music that explores the many traditions of the world. To be held the weekend of May 4th and 5th at the Princeton Meadow Event Center, 545 Meadow Road in Princeton, this event will be a special treat for all who attend.

 

On Saturday, May 4th at 7:00 PM, the Grace Notes, Quarter Notes and Semi-Tones choirs will put a spring into the step of concert goers with their music. As Associate Director Melissa Malvar-Keylock puts it: "Sing and Dance into Spring is a concert by our beginning, intermediate, and advanced intermediate level choirs, and shares the optimistic energy of spring. It will remind the audience of the enthusiasm and hope that springtime offers. Singing and Dancing in the aisles is optional."

 

While Saturday's concert exemplifies Spring, Sunday's 4:00 PM concert on May 5th, featuring the Concert Choir, Cantores, Ensemble, and special guests Svitanya Eastern European Women's Vocal Ensemble is entitled World Music Suite: Music from Eastern Europe and Beyond. According to Artistic Director Lynnel Joy Jenkins, "the girls explore the music of Eastern Europe through performing folk songs from Bulgaria, Georgia, Russia, Croatia and other European countries. With special guests, Svitanya, we perform the music traditions of various countries offering our audience a suite of World music."

 

One particularly exciting aspect of this concert is the collaborative singing that will take place between the young girls of Princeton Girlchoir and the experienced singers of Svitanya, echoing the traditional, multi-generational singing of folk songs in Eastern Europe. The Women's Vocal Ensemble Svitanya was founded in 2001 with six singers performing a cappella arrangements for the purpose of bringing "this beautiful music to a wide range of audiences - from those who are familiar through their ancestral roots to those who are encountering it for the first time." Their enchanting performances of Eastern European folk music have mesmerized audiences across the northeastern United States, and this magic is sure to be felt at Princeton Girlchoir's World Music Suite with the vital voices of emerging choirs and the vigor of collaborative singing that brings people together. As it is often said: Music is the strongest form of magic!

 

Tickets can be purchased online at www.princetongirlchoir.org or by phone at 1-866-967-8167. For more information, please contact the Princeton Girlchoir office at 609-688-1888, or visit  www.princetongirlchoir.org 

______________________________________________________________________ 

 

More About the Princeton Girlchoir

 

The choir that Founder and Artistic Director Emeritus Jan Westrick started in 1989 as an after-school activity for a small number of girls interested in choral music has grown into the area's premier training and performance choir for over 200 girls aged 8 to 18. To date, Princeton Girlchoir's alumnae number more than 400 young women, many of whom continue to sing in their schools, churches, communities and on professional stages around the world.

 

Princeton Girlchoir presents a wide array of musical genres, conductors and composers. While honing their musicianship, our choristers begin life-long friendships, enjoy professional performance opportunities, and travel the world.

 

We are a family of six choirs, beginning with third-graders and including girls through their high-school years. Choristers from towns throughout Central New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania come together each week from September through May to rehearse, and they perform some four to twenty concerts throughout the year, depending upon their choir level. Members of the Concert Choir may also take part in the annual summer tour.

 

The Princeton Girlchoir makes powerful, graceful and joyous music, and music makes powerful, graceful and joyous girls. We are dedicated to presenting extraordinary treble music, while building artistry, confidence, and a life-long love of singing together.  

Valid from 04/13/2013 to 05/07/2013

Hopewell Valley Arts Council Announces it's first EVENT - the Stampede! June 13, 2013

05/16/2013

Come learn more about the Hopewell Valley Arts Council and its first event, the Stampede!  Space is limted! Open to the first 140 guests. Your ticket includes brick oven pizza and a glass of wine. Entertainment will be provided by local Hopewell Valley performers.

The Hopewell Valley Arts Council is a valley-wide organization that advances the role of the arts and artists in building community, and to fund programs and community space that support the visual, performing and musical arts.

The Hopewell Valley Stampede is a public art exhibit modeled after an idea introduced in Zurich, Switzerland. Over 800 decorated cows were placed throughout Zurich’s landscape drawing worldwide attention and attracting thousands of local and foreign visitors. In the spring and summer of 2014, Hopewell Valley will be the home to 50 – 60 oxen, decorated or painted by local artists. 

Learn how you can join the Stampede! We are looking for artists of all types, sponsors, and volunteers to help with many types of events during the next two years.

Hopewell Valley Vineyards
46 Yard Road 
Pennington, NJ NJ

Thursday, June 13, 2013 from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM

Valid from 05/16/2013 to 06/14/2013

LAUNCHING THE FIRST MOBILE BREAD HOUSE…To then go global from Princeton!

05/22/2013

MAY 25th, Saturday, noon – 4pm, Terra Momo Bakery Parking Lot, across the Princeton Public Library

The audacious task of changing the world can’t be waged on an empty stomach - but what about bread alone?  Perhaps - if produced by the Bread Houses Network (BHN).  Their hand-made, artisanal breads, enriched with uncommon additives like hope and brotherhood, boast a proven track record in countries around the world.  

On May 25th, due to the generous support of Princeton University’s David A. Gardner '79 Magic Grant, the Princeton community can enjoy the launching of the first-in-the-world, to then go global, Mobile Bread House. The concept was developed by Princeton anthropology graduate student Nadezhda Savova, and the design was created by architect Raymond Olive, part of his Master thesis on Interventional Design from the Pratt Institute in New York and engineer Pete Abrams building on his B Home project for affordable housing cells in the form of beehive hexagons (http://thebhome.wikispaces.com/mobile+bread+house).

The long-term mission of the Mobile Bread House is to travel to neighborhoods and their public parks, schools, YMCAs, etc. and host community events / mini festivals where children and adults and people of all ages will be encouraged to participate in collective bread-making and earth oven-building as methods of community-building that we have already proven successful in various countries. From Princeton, the Mobile Bread House is planned to go global and be built in the countries where the BHN already works.

The mission of the Bread Houses Network, and thus the Mobile Bread House, is to break barriers and empower people of different ages, cultures, and classes through the making, baking, and breaking of bread together.  Infuse that scene with other art forms (theater, music, painting, poetry, pottery, etc.) and it can become a universal recipe for bringing very different - even feuding groups - together.

The Bread Houses Network evolved out of Dr. Nadezhda Savova’s PhD research on community development through the arts, where she developed bread-making as a form of community art and art therapy, forming community cultural centers called Bread Houses.  After only 3 years the Bread Houses Network connects more than 12 countries on 5 continents (www.breadhousesnetwork.org).  For her initiative, Dr. Savova was named Traveler of the Year (2012)” by The National Geographic for her travels to knead joy and friendships among cultures (http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/travelers-of-the-year/nadezhda-savova/). 

The Bread Houses Network has a tax-deductible 501c3 status in the USA as a fiscally sponsored project under the umbrella of the NY-based organization Fractured Atlas, where we receive donations that are tax-deductible for the donors: https://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/fiscal/profile?id=7006.

For more information please visit BHN (www.breadhousesnetwork.org) or contact us at:bhn.mbh@gmail.com and nadezhda.savova@gmail.com.

 

Valid from 05/22/2013 to 05/26/2013

Special Savings Upstairs at The Front Porch

05/23/2013

Image

Valid from 05/23/2013 to 05/28/2013

Sustainable Princeton Selects First Partner for EnergySmart Homes Campaign

07/26/2013

 

Princeton NJ –Sustainable Princeton, a nonprofit organization focused on reducing energy use and waste in Princeton, New Jersey has awarded a contract to Ciel Power LLC to conduct 100 low cost home energy assessments for Princeton residents over the next year as part of its EnergySmart Homes Campaign.

 

The EnergySmart Homes campaign focuses on practical ways for homeowners to save energy and money and will help the town of Princeton earn silver certification as a sustainable community with Sustainable Jersey, a certifying organization for the state. The town of Princeton is currently certified at the bronze level as a Sustainable Community. 

 

“Sustainable Princeton has been working towards a goal of achieving a 20 percent reduction in the amount of energy generated from fossil fuels in Princeton by 2020.  Our EnergySmart Homes Campaign streamlines the process of choosing a home energy auditor and offers home energy assessments at a reasonable rate of $49 so homeowners can easily take the first step towards home energy savings and efficiency,” says Matthew Wasserman, Chairman of the Board of Sustainable Princeton. 

 

Ciel Power is a Building Performance Institute (BPI) certified provider of residential energy assessments and energy-efficient home retrofits and has conducted similar municipal campaigns in Highland Park and Woodbridge, New Jersey.

 

 “We are honored that Sustainable Princeton selected Ciel Power LLC as its EnergySmart Homes Campaign partner.  Our organization has demonstrated tremendous success in prior municipal campaigns and we look forward to doing the same in Princeton,” says Scott Fischer, Managing Member of Ciel Power LLC. 

 

Many New Jersey homeowners are unaware that significant incentives are available to them to upgrade insulation, and replace inefficient heating & cooling equipment.The New Jersey Home Performance with Energy Star Program provides incentives of up to $5,000 in cash-back rebates and up to $10,000 in zero-interest financing to New Jersey residents who make these improvements on their home.  As an accredited contractor through the New Jersey Home Performance with Energy Star Program, Ciel Power can help Princeton residents access these cash-back and financing incentives.

 

A home energy assessment is an important first step towards an increased awareness of contemporary energy-efficiency measures. These measures, when properly installed, provide numerous benefits to a homeowner including:

 

      Economic benefits through reduced seasonal heating & cooling cost

 

      Environmental benefits derived from lower overall fossil fuel consumption

 

      Lifestyle benefits realized through increased comfort in a home

 

      Health benefits realized through proper ventilation & moisture control

 

As part of this contract, Ciel Power LLC will provide energy assessment services to Princeton residents at a discounted rate of $49, following guidelines set forth by the Building Performance Institute. These include safety and efficiency testing of combustion appliances, depressurization of the home, evaluation of existing insulation levels, and a comprehensive report outlining specific deficiencies and prioritized list of recommended improvements based on overall return on investment. 

 

To schedule a home energy assessment at the discounted $49 rate, Princeton residents shouldcall Ciel Power at 201-632-3463.

 

About Sustainable Princeton:

 

Sustainable Princeton is a dynamic and forward thinking nonprofit dedicated to reducing Princeton's waste and energy use - as well as its impact on the natural environment. Sustainable Princeton works with local Princeton residents, businesses, schools, local government and other community groups to achieve measurable results.

 

Sustainable Princeton has set two ambitious goals for the community:

 

·     Reduce energy from fossil fuels 20 percent in Princeton by2020;

 

·     Reduce waste by 50 percent in Princeton by 2016

 

To learn more about Sustainable Princeton, visit www.sustainableprinceton.org or call (609)454-4757

 

About Ciel Power LLC:

 

A recipient of the 2013 Business Incubation Network Award, Ciel Power LLC is a One-Source Solution for customers interested in becoming energy-efficient.  Ciel Power LLC provides residential customers with a full suite of energy-efficient products and services including a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, prioritized retrofit recommendations, insulation and air-sealing, energy efficient lighting and alternative energy solutions.

 

Ciel Power LLC is a Building Performance Institute Accredited Contractor, a New Jersey Home Performance with Energy Star Accredited Contractor, and is a Licensed New Jersey Home Improvement Contractor (NJHIC# 13VH06170900) with offices in Nutley, Lyndhurst, and Glen Rock, New Jersey.  The company is currently seeking office space in the Princeton area.

 

Ciel Power LLC provides services to customers throughout the State of New Jersey.  For more information about Ciel Power'sproducts and services, visit www.cielpower.com or call 201-632-3463.

 

Valid from 07/26/2013 to 09/15/2013

Princeton House Provides First Responder Treatment Services

08/27/2013

Police and corrections officers, members of the military, firefighters, paramedics and EMTs are the first ones to run toward danger or disaster. Unfortunately, they tend to be the last ones to seek help when they feel overwhelmed by the pressures of their jobs.

As a result, the difficulties faced by first responders often escalate before they are treated. First responders are particularly susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and substance abuse. Their rates of divorce and suicide are significantly higher than rates among the general population.

Princeton House Behavioral Health (PHBH) recently launched an inpatient service tailored to the needs of first responders.

“First responders are strong, self-reliant people, so it can be difficult for them to ask for help,” said Richard Wohl, President of PHBH and Senior Vice President of Princeton HealthCare System. “Our goal is to help them understand that there is no dishonor in seeking professional treatment. And once they make that step, our program is designed to help them get healthy and get back to the critical work they do.”

Offered at the PHBH inpatient campus in Princeton, the program began earlier this year. Each patient undergoes a comprehensive evaluation, including assessment of medical, mental health and addiction issues, and receives individualized treatment which may include individual, group and family therapy; evidence-based practices; psychotropic medication management; nutrition counseling; expressive therapies (such as art or music therapy); and exercise. When indicated, this approach is integrated with traditional 12-step recovery based programming.

The program accounts for the cumulative effect of the stresses associated with critical incidents that first responders experience on a routine basis, said Michael Bizzarro, PhD, LCSW, BCD, director of PHBH’s First Responder Treatment Services.

“The repeated exposure to tragedy can have a devastating effect on a first responder’s relationships and daily functioning,” Dr. Bizzarro said. “Some seek temporary relief through alcohol and other substances, which, over time, may lead to alcoholism or addiction. This abuse will impact every member of a first responder’s family, so family participation is an important component of patients’ treatment and is crucial to their recovery.”

Dr. Bizzarro said treatment time for each first responder will vary depending on his or her psychological and medical needs. When first responders are ready to return to the community, PHBH helps coordinate their return to work and makes recommendations for follow-up care.

PHBH also refers first responders to outpatient providers and helps locate 12-step programs or “Bottles & Badges” support groups near their homes.

For more information or to make a referral, please visit www.princetonhouse.org or call (800) 242-2550. Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurance plans are accepted.



About Princeton HealthCare System
Princeton HealthCare System is a comprehensive, integrated healthcare system that strives to anticipate and serve the lifelong needs of central New Jersey residents, including acute care hospital services through University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, behavioral healthcare through Princeton House Behavioral Health, rehabilitation, home care, hospice care, ambulatory surgery, a primary and specialty medical practice, and fitness and wellness services. For more information, visit www.princetonhcs.org.

Valid from 08/27/2013 to 09/30/2013

New Vera Bradley Mark Downs Upstairs at The Front Porch

09/09/2013

Image

Valid from 09/09/2013 to 09/21/2013

West Windsor Arts Council Announces First Fall Show “Under Pressure” September 9 - November 15

09/05/2013

 

The West Windsor Arts Council invites you to Under Pressure, its first fall show at the West Windsor Arts Center.  Monday, September 9 - Friday, November 15

Opening Reception Sunday, September 15 4-6:30 PM with Artist’s talk at 4:30. Film screening to follow at 5:30 PM.

 

Princeton Junction, NJ 08550, September 3, 2013: The West Windsor Arts Council presents its first exhibit of the 2013-2014 season. “Under Pressure,” a printmaking show, is juried by notable artist, Eileen Foti.

The West Windsor Arts Council announces the first exhibition in its 2013-2014 season. “Under Pressure” will explore printmaking.  Eileen Foti juries the show. “Under Pressure” runs from Monday, September 9  – Friday, November 15 with an artist reception on Sunday, September 15 from 4 - 6:30 PM. An artists talk will take place at 4:30 PM and a special screening of the documentary “A Ripple in the Water: Healing Through Art,” written and co-produced by juror Eileen Foti, will begin at 5:30 PM.  An award-winning documentary, the film explores papermaking, printmaking, and embroidery projects used in poverty alleviation and HIV/AIDS awareness programs for women across South Africa.

“The West Windsor Arts Council is so thrilled to open our new season with such a strong show,” says Executive Director, Arin Black. “Printmaking can produce such varied, lively, and original works. I’m excited to see what contributing artists bring.”

Some of the exhibiting artists include:

Jean Burdick who received her MFA from The University of the Arts, Philadelphia, PA, and her BFA from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York, and has worked as a textile designer and an arts educator in the West Windsor Plainsboro School District. Her paintings and prints are included in public, corporate and private collections.

Barbara Churilla, an AOY Art Camp Director who is a retired art educator from the East Windsor Regional School District.  Born in CT, she resided in West Windsor for 16 years and currently a resident in Newtown, PA.  In July 2013, she exhibited in a juried show at First Street Gallery in Chelsea, NYC.

Dillon Edelhauser of Bradley Beach, NJ, a painter and a printmaker, who is intrigued by the human face. The major influences in his printmaking style are the German expressionists, Erich Heckel and Ernest Ludwig Kirschner. 

Catherine LeCleire of Montclair, NJ, an instructor in Silkscreen and Painting Processes at Pratt Institute and Book Arts at Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey. She has shown nationally and internationally and her work is in several major collections.

The exhibit is located at the West Windsor Art Center's Gallery at 952 Alexander Rd. (located in the historic Princeton Junction Firehouse) in Princeton Junction.  Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from noon until 6 PM, Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM.

Free event parking is available at the Wallace Road Special Permit Lot.

About the Juror:

EILEEN FOTI teaches printmaking at William Paterson University.  Previously, she was Master Printer at the Brodsky Center for Innovative Editions, and Interim Education Director at Tamarind Institute. Foti is on the Board of Advisors for the Artist Proof Studio at Johannesburg, the Board of Advisors at the Printmaking Center of NJ, and was an Advisor to Crow’s Shadow Institute on the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon.   

About the West Windsor Arts Council:

The West Windsor Arts Council’s mission is to provide professional quality community arts programming in order to support, educate, inspire, and promote the arts and art appreciation.  Founded in 2002, the West Windsor Arts Council opened the doors of the new West Windsor Arts Center on September 25, 2010 in the historic Princeton Junction Firehouse at 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, NJ 08550.

 

For information on the West Windsor Arts Council and West Windsor Arts Center, please visit www.westwindsorarts.org. Office and gallery hours: Mon-Fri, 10:00-6:00 pm and Sat, 10:00 am-4:00 pm. Call 609.716.1931 or write info@westwindsorarts.org.

 

Valid from 09/05/2013 to 09/30/2013

First Annual Bordentown Wine & Beer Festival September 21, 2013

09/11/2013

Wine and Beer Festival 2013

 

Admissions is Free * $20 to Sample 

Kid's are welcome and no pets.

 

QUESTIONS CONTACT

APRIL SETTE

609-516-9306

OR

APRILSETTE@GMAIL.COM

 

Valid from 09/11/2013 to 09/22/2013

RESPONSIBLE JEWELLERY COUNCIL CERTIFIES FIRST FAMILY-OWNED JEWELER, HAMILTON JEWELERS

02/13/2012

PRINCETON, N.J. - The Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) announced today that Hamilton Jewelers, the third generation fine jeweler, has achieved certification meeting the ethical, human rights, social and environmental standards as established by the RJC’s Member Certification System.  Hamilton is exceptional in this accomplishment as being the first family-owned jeweler to achieve this certification.

 

“RJC warmly congratulates Hamilton Jewelers on its certification. The successful verification assessment was conducted by UL Responsible Sourcing (STR), one of the independent third-party auditing firms accredited to the RJC’s Member Certification System,” says Michael Rae, RJC’s Chief Executive Officer.

 

Hank Siegel, Hamilton’s President and CEO remarks, “As we begin to celebrate our centennial year in 2012, Hamilton is extremely proud of our certification by the RJC, and additionally honored to be the first independent family-owned retailer to be certified. Our firm and my family have long embraced our ethical and social responsibilities to serve our communities and industry, and are deeply appreciative of the RJC’s activities to promote such practices and extend them throughout the entire supply chain. We encourage all fine jewelry retailers, large and small, to consider RJC certification.”

 

About Hamilton Jewelers

Founded in 1912 and celebrating its centennial year, Hamilton serve serves clients in both the New Jersey and Palm Beach communities as well as a national and international clientele.  Hamilton has been a longtime supporter of many important efforts to sustain social responsibility in its business as well as the fine jewelry industry.    Including partnership with the Jewelers Vigilance Committee (JVC), Jewelers of America (JA), American Gem Society (AGS), and the Diamond Trading Company (DTC), Hamilton takes this commitment to the environment, human rights, and the planet seriously.  The company also carefully monitors its carbon footprint.  Through such measures as:  energy efficient lighting and power in stores, printing media and collateral materials on FSC recycled paper, OSHA compliant waste disposal, and more, Hamilton continually improves environmental policies.

 

Hamilton is additionally recognized in the fine jewelry industry as a leader in employee training and education, having developed extensive in-house programs for the advancement and education of its employees.   Hamilton Jewelers was an early adopter of enforcing The Kimberly Process and supports the United Nations' efforts to stop the sales of diamonds from any country where rebel forces use diamonds to finance acts of war and terror.   Hamilton is also a member in good standing of The Fair Labor Association, (FLA), supporting the organization's mission to protect workers' rights and improve working conditions worldwide.  More information about Hamilton can be found on the company’s website:  http://www.hamiltonjewelers.com, where the About Hamilton section discusses the Company’s efforts in the community and industry.  

 

About RJC

The Responsible Jewellery Council is an international not-for-profit organization bringing together more than 350 member companies committed to promoting responsible ethical, human rights, social and environmental practices in a transparent and accountable manner throughout the jewelry industry from mine to retail. Their commitment aims to reinforce consumer and stakeholder confidence in diamond, gold and platinum group metals jewelry products. The Council has developed the RJC Member Certification System, a certification system, which will apply to all Members’ businesses that contribute to the diamond, gold and platinum group metals jewelry supply chain. All Commercial Members of the RJC are required to be audited by accredited, third-party auditors to verify their conformance with the RJC’s Code of Practices and become certified under the RJC Member Certification System. A full list of its Members can be found on the web atwww.responsiblejewellery.com.

 


Valid from 02/13/2012 to 03/31/2012

“Sweetheart Dinner” Art Contest Sponsored by: First Baptist Church of Eggerts Crossing

01/12/2014

Love in the Eyes of God focusing on women as a Christian should. First Baptist Church of Eggerts Crossing will be hosting an Art Contest showcasing local artistry.. We plan on giving ten percent of the proceeds to the Susan G. Komen Foundation and another ten percent of the proceeds will be divided between the top three winners of our Art contest. Create an original piece of artwork, and yours may be chosen to enter the “Sweetheart Dinner Art Contest” sponsored by First Baptist Church of Eggerts Crossing. Any questions send email to fbcofeggertscrossing@gmail.com

Eligibility:
Any student attending a New Jersey College or High School ages 17 to 25 can submit their art work for this contest.

Deadline:
Entries must be submitted online only and then paintings mailed to First Baptist
Church of Eggerts Crossing  121 Hillcrest Ave, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 by January 24, 2014. Those students who submit their painting early on in the contest will have more advantage to earn more money. The contest will be limited to only 20 students so submitting your painting as soon as possible is encouraged. Please allow plenty of time for mailing in your paintings so that deadline of January 24, 2014 is met. The Ebay auction will start  on  January 26, 2014  – February 2, 2014. Entry Fee: For each painting is $10 (Online submission only)

Judging:
Entries will be voted on by donation of dollars submitted through our website for your painting and any ads submitted stating they were referred by you. Along with an online EBAY auction of contest students paintings proceeds. The sooner your painting is received the sooner you can start having your friends and family vote by dollar donations. The contest will be limited to 20 students. All other entries will go toward a silent auction at our “Sweet Heart Dinner”.

Prize:
The top three students who earn the most in
donations will receive 10 percent of the “Sweetheart Dinner” art contest proceeds divided in the following manner (5 percent to 1st prize), (3 percent to 2nd prize), (2 percent to 3rd prize). Those 20 students selected for the contest will also have free admission to our “Sweet Heart Dinner” Held February 9, 2014 at 5PM at The Hollowbrook Community Center at 320 Hollowbrook Drive, Ewing, NJ 08638.

Winning students will be presented with their Cash prizes at our “Sweet Heart Dinner”. Artists and their families are encouraged to attend. Tickets for non-contestant students and all students’ families can be purchased either online for $32 or at First Baptist Church of Eggerts Crossing for $30. See: www.firstbaptisteggertscrossing.org for further information or call 609-882-5136 or send email to fbcofeggertscrossing@gmail.com.

Design Rules: Artwork must be submitted on an 11" x 14" poster board then matted and mailed to First Baptist by January 24, 2014. Artwork must be student's own work; no tracings, no glitter, no coloring pages from internet or anywhere else such as magazines, newspaper, ETC.  Artwork must not weigh more than 15 pounds. Artwork must show the theme: Love in the Eyes of God focusing on women.  Use 200 words or less to describe your painting in your online submission.

Mediums accepted: Pen, pencil, markers, paints, oils, charcoal, watercolors, acrylic, etc. Color is preferred.

Medium Not Accepted: Digital paintings

Each 11" x 14“  poster must have the student entry form which was filled out online attached to their paintings (which can be enlarged) and affixed to the back this provides us with your contact information.

 

Special Note:

All work must be original. Materials cannot violate trademarks, copyrights, and/or rights of privacy or publicity; applicable federal, state, and local laws, rules, and regulations must be complied with; and rights of the materials must not have not been previously given to other people, organizations, or businesses. If entries contain copyrighted, branded, and/or trademarked materials without proper written permission, they will be disqualified. Contestant indemnifies and holds the First Baptist Church of Eggerts Crossing, its officers, Pastor or any members harmless from any and all liability arising from, or relating to, the judging or handling of the design submitted and conducting, sponsoring and advertising the event. By entering the contest, Contestant grants First Baptist Church Of Eggerts Crossing a royalty-free worldwide, perpetual, non-exclusive license to display, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works of the entries, in whole or in part, and the designer's name and photograph in any media now existing or subsequently developed for any educational, promotional, publicity, exhibition, and all other standard purposes. First Baptist Church of Eggerts Crossing will not be required to pay any additional consideration or seek any additional approval in connection with such uses. First Baptist Church of Eggerts Crossing reserves the right to use any image submitted for promotion of our website and future art contests.
 
            

Valid from 01/12/2014 to 01/25/2014

Tennis Tournament to Support Montgomery First Responders at the Nassau Tennis Club Feb 15 - 17

01/30/2014

Skillman, NJ (January 30, 2014) – Nassau Tennis Club is hosting a Presidents’ Day Weekend Tennis Tournament from Saturday, February 15 – Monday, February 17 at Nassau Tennis Club’s indoor tennis facility located at 1800 Route 206, Skillman, NJ.
The tournament is for adults 18 and over. The event will include Doubles and Singles events for Men and Women at USTA levels ranging from 3.0 to 4.0. The deadline to register for the tournament is February 7, 2014.
Nassau Tennis Club is suggesting that players make a donation to support Montgomery First Responders (Montgomery EMS, Police Department, Fire Company #1 & #2). For every dollar donated by tournament participants, the Nassau Tennis Club will match up to $2,000.
“Nassau Tennis Club is proud to be part of the Montgomery community and appreciates the hard work and dedication of our First Responders. This tournament is a great way to compete, have fun and give back to the community,” says Benton Camper, Owner & Manager of the Nassau Tennis Club.
To learn more, register for the tournament or make a donation, visit www.NassauTennis.Net

The Nassau Tennis Club is a family owned business that has been providing tennis, fitness and sports programs to the Greater Montgomery, Hillsborough and Princeton area for nearly 40 years. Located in Skillman, NJ, the facility has 10 indoor hard courts, 5 outdoor Har-Tru courts, pro shop, pool and a club house with locker rooms, viewing areas, babysitting, workout rooms and an area for socializing & parties. Nassau offers tennis programs for adults and juniors at all levels including instructional clinics, private lessons, leagues, travel teams, USTA teams, fitness programs and social events.
 

 

Valid from 01/30/2014 to 02/18/2014

Tennis Tournament to Support Montgomery First Responders at the Nassau Tennis Club Feb 15 - 17

01/30/2014

Skillman, NJ (January 30, 2014) – Nassau Tennis Club is hosting a Presidents’ Day Weekend Tennis Tournament from Saturday, February 15 – Monday, February 17 at Nassau Tennis Club’s indoor tennis facility located at 1800 Route 206, Skillman, NJ.
The tournament is for adults 18 and over. The event will include Doubles and Singles events for Men and Women at USTA levels ranging from 3.0 to 4.0. The deadline to register for the tournament is February 7, 2014.
Nassau Tennis Club is suggesting that players make a donation to support Montgomery First Responders (Montgomery EMS, Police Department, Fire Company #1 & #2). For every dollar donated by tournament participants, the Nassau Tennis Club will match up to $2,000.
“Nassau Tennis Club is proud to be part of the Montgomery community and appreciates the hard work and dedication of our First Responders. This tournament is a great way to compete, have fun and give back to the community,” says Benton Camper, Owner & Manager of the Nassau Tennis Club.
To learn more, register for the tournament or make a donation, visit www.NassauTennis.Net

The Nassau Tennis Club is a family owned business that has been providing tennis, fitness and sports programs to the Greater Montgomery, Hillsborough and Princeton area for nearly 40 years. Located in Skillman, NJ, the facility has 10 indoor hard courts, 5 outdoor Har-Tru courts, pro shop, pool and a club house with locker rooms, viewing areas, babysitting, workout rooms and an area for socializing & parties. Nassau offers tennis programs for adults and juniors at all levels including instructional clinics, private lessons, leagues, travel teams, USTA teams, fitness programs and social events.
 

Valid from 02/03/2014 to 02/18/2014

Notre Dame Presents HAIRSPRAY, Feb. 28, March 1,7 and 8

02/28/2014

The Performing Arts Students of Notre Dame High School are proud to present Hairspray. Performances are Friday and Saturday, February 28, March 1, 7 and 8 at 7:30 p.m.

Hairspray, the musical, features Tracy Turnblad, a "pleasantly plump" teenager with all the right moves, who is captivated by the Corny Collins Show, a local teenage dance program. Every day after school, she and her best friend Penny run home to watch the show and drool over teenage heart throb Link Larkin, much to Tracy's mother Edna's dismay.
 
After one of the stars of the show leaves, Corny Collins holds auditions to see who will be the next dancer featured on his show. With the help of her friend Seaweed, Tracy aces her audition and joins the cast of the show, angering the evil dance queen Amber Von Tussle and her mother Velma. Tracy decides it's not fair that the African American kids can only dance on the Corny Collins Show once a month, and with the help of Seaweed, Link, Penny, Motormouth Maybelle, her father and Edna, she's going to integrate the show.....without denting her 'do!
 
The music for the show is contagious, and the “big hair” is outrageous!

Lou Gibilisco is the Artistic and Music Director. Debby Gibilisco is the Choreographer and Costume Coordinator; David Chebra is Technical Director and Scenic Designer; Kevin Potucek is the Lighting Designer; Danielle Constance is Props and Scenic Artist and Ed Patton is Makeup Coordinator and House Manager.

Ticket prices are $12 for adults and $8 for senior citizens (62+), students and children. For reserved seating please call (609)882-7900, or order tickets online at www.ndnj.org.

Valid from 02/28/2014 to 03/09/2014

Donald F. Denny Jr., MD, Appointed Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs

03/10/2014

PLAINSBORO, N.J. (March 10, 2014)—Accomplished physician and healthcare leader Donald F. Denny Jr., MD, has been selected as the Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs at Princeton HealthCare System (PHCS).

Board certified in Diagnostic Radiology with subspecialty certification in Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Dr. Denny has been a member of the PHCS Medical Staff since 1991 and formerly served as Chairman of Radiology. He also has served as President of the Radiology Society of New Jersey and President of Princeton Radiology Associates.

In his new role, Dr. Denny will have primary responsibility for the quality of care provided by all units of PHCS and provide leadership in all aspects of medical affairs.

“The physicians and management team members who were involved in the interview and selection process felt Dr. Denny was a perfect fit,” said PHCS President and CEO Barry S. Rabner. “He has the knowledge of best practices and the leadership skills needed to excel in this position and help us to continue our tradition of providing exceptional care.”

Dr. Denny earned his MD from Hahnemann Medical College (now Drexel University College of Medicine) and completed his internship and residency at Yale-New Haven Hospital, where he served as chief resident in diagnostic radiology. He then completed a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. His academic appointments include positions at Yale University, Harvard Medical School and Brown University. Prior to joining PHCS, Dr. Denny was on staff at Rhode Island Hospital and Yale-New Haven Hospital. While serving as Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs, Dr. Denny will maintain a limited role as a private-practice interventional radiologist.

Outside of medicine, Dr. Denny has a wide range of interests that include skiing, swimming, bicycling, and competing in triathlons. In December, he and his wife Catherine Knight, an architect in Princeton, completed hiking the “48 New Hampshire 4,000 footers,” a series of peaks in the White Mountains.

A pilot, Dr. Denny owns a 1967 Beechcraft Bonanza, a small classic plane that he and Catherine like to fly all over the East Coast and the Midwest.

Dr. Denny and his wife have lived in Princeton for 22 years. They have three adult daughters, Elizabeth, Catherine and Sarah.



About Princeton HealthCare System
Princeton HealthCare System is a comprehensive, integrated healthcare system that strives to anticipate and serve the lifelong needs of central New Jersey residents, including acute care hospital services through University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, behavioral healthcare through Princeton House Behavioral Health, rehabilitation, home care, hospice care, ambulatory surgery, a primary and specialty medical practice, and fitness and wellness services. For more information, visit
www.princetonhcs.org.

Valid from 03/10/2014 to 05/01/2014

Tennis Tournament to Support Montgomery First Responders at the Nassau Tennis Club

01/25/2013

The Nassau Tennis Club is hosting a Presidents Weekend Tennis Tournament from Saturday, February 16 – Monday, February 18 at Nassau Tennis Club’s indoor tennis facility located at 1800 Route 206, Skillman, NJ.

The tournament is for adults 18 and over.  The event will include Doubles and Singles events for Men and Women at USTA levels ranging from 3.0 to 4.0.  The deadline to register for the tournament is February 3, 2013.

Nassau Tennis Club is suggesting that players make a donation to support Montgomery First Responders (Montgomery EMS, Police Department, Fire Company #1 & #2).  For every dollar donated by tournament participants, the Nassau Tennis Club will match up to $2,000.

“Nassau Tennis Club is proud to be part of the Montgomery community and appreciates the hard work and dedication of our First Responders. This tournament is a great way to compete, have fun and give back to the community,” says Benton Camper, Owner & Manager of the Nassau Tennis Club.

To learn more, register for the tournament or make a donation, visit www.NassauTennis.Net

 

Valid from 01/25/2013 to 02/19/2013

First Annual "Run for Hope" 5k Cancer Run October 25, 2014

05/30/2014

The First annual 5k Cancer Run called "The Run 4 Hope" will be held locally at Mercer County Park in West Windsor on Saturday October 25, 2014.  It is a family friendly event.  We will not only have a 5k race but also a 1 mile fun run/walk for those who want to participate but are not competitive runners.  We are also welcoming local vendors and sponsors to be present at the event so we can provide a fun atmosphere for the families with activities such as a pottery class demo for kids where we will have pink clay molded ribbons and candle holders with "HOPE" on it.  


Because we are working with Marna's Pals, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, all the proceeds will be donated to the Marna Pal Memorial Scholarship Fund to benefit cancer-affected families trying to send their loved ones through college.
 
Please visit The Run 4 Hope's webpages for more details:

Valid from 05/30/2014 to 10/26/2014

With Persisting Heroin Epidemic Providers Offer a Way Out through Recovery Support from First Day to Long Term

09/06/2014

September is Recovery Month

Wellness Week is Sept. 15-21st

 

(Mercerville – September 3, 2014) – Like most of the nation, New Jersey is struggling with an ongoing heroin epidemic. As children, adults, families and communities struggle to cope when the epidemic hits home substance use and mental health providers offer a way out. There are many pathways to recovery but a common one is accessing some form of treatment, service or support to help navigate through a substance use or mental health disorder. Many times treatment is the first step. However, often treatment or support services are needed throughout the long term to maintain recovery.

 

September marks both: National Recovery Month and Wellness Week which is September 15-21st. Recovery Month is about celebrating the recovery of individuals who are leading healthy lives and also the providers who often times help them along their way. Wellness Week was launched in an effort to inspire organizations and individuals to live well and to embrace the eight dimensions of wellness. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) promotes the eight dimensions of wellness which do not focus on the absence of disease, illness or stress, but the presence of purpose in life, active involvement in satisfying work and play, joyful relationships, a healthy body and living environment, and happiness.

 

The New Jersey Association of Mental Health and Addiction Agencies, Inc. (NJAMHAA) is comprised of 180 non-profit providers of mental health and substance use treatment and services. Debra Wentz, Ph.D., CEO of NJAMHAA said “Our providers offer every service from outpatient counseling to inpatient residential programs and to every age range which is important because many people can experience more than one behavioral health disorder. There is a large incidence of co-occurrence of mental health and substance use, but also developmental disabilities, serious emotional disorders and other traumas affect one individual, requiring highly trained providers to treat the person holistically”

 

NAJMHAA member organizations’ services address most if not all of the eight dimensions of wellness. Dr. Wentz added “It is the goal of all 180 of our members to help the 500,000 children and adults they serve to gain and maintain recovery and enjoy as happy, healthy and productive a life as possible.”

 

SAMHSA has created a number of wellness tools for organizations and individuals to use. They can be found here: http://www.promoteacceptance.samhsa.gov/10by10/wellness_tools.aspx

                                                    

Based in the Greater Trenton, New Jersey area, the New Jersey Association of Mental Health and Addiction Agencies, Inc. (NJAMHAA) is a statewide trade association representing nonprofit behavioral health agencies. Founded in 1951, NJAMHAA represents 180 hospital-based and freestanding providers of mental health and substance use treatment services throughout New Jersey. In aggregate, NJAMHAA members help more than 500,000 children and adults with mental health and substance use issues annually and employ approximately 98,000 members of New Jersey’s workforce. NJAMHAA’s mission is to promote the value of its member organizations by providing advocacy, visibility and professional development to facilitate their economic viability, which is essential to ensure their ongoing capacity to deliver quality, cost-effective healthcare and social services and supports to those they serve. NJAMHAA is committed to recovery and wellness for all individuals. For more information about NJAMHAA, please visit www.njamhaa.org.

 

Valid from 09/06/2014 to 09/22/2014

Communiversity Held on a SUNDAY (April 28) For First Time in 40 Years

02/27/2013

Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) Executive Director, Jeff Nathanson (left), and Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce President and CEO, Peter Crowley (right), welcomed Chamber members to a "Business after Business" networking event recently hosted by the ACP. Nathanson announced that the Arts Council's Communiversity Festival of the Arts event will be held on Sunday, April 28th this year -- the first time in its 40 year history that this community festival will be held on a Sunday.

Valid from 02/27/2013 to 04/29/2013

Princeton-Blairstown Welcomes New Trustees

01/20/2015

Additions Bring Financial Expertise and Commitment to New Jersey’s Youth

 

Princeton, NJ – January 20, 2015 -- The Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) today welcomed several new board members to the organization. PBC offers a wide variety of youth development and experiential educational programs to students in the Mid-Atlantic States, including Trenton High School and Rivera Middle School in New Jersey and Global Neighborhood Secondary School in New York City. 

The current board unanimously voted in Tim Downs, Bruce Petersen, Gwen Cogan Brunelli and Daphne Thomas Jones to three-year terms as Trustees.  A finance and accounting expert, Mr. Downs currently heads Princeton University’s Facilities Finance and Administrative Services team.  With degrees from Temple University and the University of Delaware, he recently served on the Board of the Pennsylvania Department of Education Board of Private Licensed Schools and assisted the Council Rock School District as a special project consultant. 

“Bruce, Tim, Gwen, and Daphne bring exceptional financial expertise, business acumen, and a commitment to supporting at-risk youth that will complement PBC’s current board.  We warmly welcome them to the organization and look forward to working with them,” said Pam Gregory, PBC’s Executive Director.

Bruce Petersen, a recently retired Managing Director at Goldman Sachs and Princeton alumnus, joined the board as well.  He brings extensive financial expertise to Princeton-Blairstown, after a 35-year career in the financial services industry. He is a former board member and current finance committee chair of New Jersey Swimming, Inc. He and his wife are former emergency foster care providers for the Division of Youth and Family Services of New Jersey.

Gwen Cogan Brunelli, a graduate of the University of Central Missouri, has extensive experience in communications, public relations, government/public affairs, and relationship building. She has held leadership positions at Verizon, Adelphia Communications, and Cablevision Systems. She is also a licensed secondary school teacher and has taught courses in English and Journalism.

Daphne Thomas Jones, a Princeton graduate and a graduate of the Princeton University Teacher Prep program, also brings her experience as a financial services executive to the PBC team.  She is Co-Executive Director of the Professional Services Group of Central New Jersey and an independent actuarial and product development consultant.

PBC’s signature program at Trenton Central High School, Leaders of Tomorrow (LOT), addresses the need to improve Trenton graduation rates by identifying ninth graders at high risk of dropping out and engaging them in an innovative combination of programming that emphasizes social emotional learning, academic counseling, leadership development, environmental awareness, and practical applications of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM).

At the Blairstown Campus, a 264-acre expanse in northwest New Jersey, students participate in intensive small group adventure-based experiential workshops designed to improve skills such as leadership, goal-setting, and healthy risk-taking. These experiences also promote environmental stewardship and complement students' classroom education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).  Most students have never experienced many of the outdoor elements of these trips. 

About Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC)

PBC seeks to transform the lives of vulnerable young people through integrated experiential and adventure-based programming in schools and at our outdoor campus. What began in 1908 as a summer camp run by Princeton University students to give inner-city boys an opportunity to have a character-building fresh air experience has evolved into a wide variety of year-round youth development experiential educational programs serving over 5,800 students from the Mid-Atlantic States.  For more information on PBC’s services or to donate, visit www.princetonblairstowncenter.org.
 

Valid from 01/20/2015 to 03/01/2015

Arts Council of Princeton Announces Opening of First-Ever Princeton Parklet with a ‘Village’ of Collaborators

06/01/2015

Princeton, NJ- Princeton’s first ‘parklet,’ a public seating platform built to transform curbside parking spaces into beautiful, lively spaces for the community to enjoy, was installed last week. Also known as "street seats,” parklets provide a means for the community, artists, art organizations, schools, residents and business owners to participate in designing and repurposing a parking space into a public art-based space.  Located in front of small world coffee on Witherspoon Street in downtown Princeton, the parklet is the first of its kind in Princeton.

“A ‘village’ of collaborators had a hand in creating the Princeton Parklet,” said Maria Evans, ACP’s Artistic Director. Mayor Liz Lempert and the Town of Princeton approached the Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) to assemble a team to facilitate the creation of a parklet in Princeton, similar to those found in major cities such as New York, San Francisco, Philadelphia, and Seattle. Evans, also an art teacher at Stuart Country Day School in Princeton, recognized that the parklet project could provide a wonderful teaching opportunity for Stuart art students. Ms. Evans and her class collaborated with a team comprised of Princeton Government's Lee Solow, the Princeton Public Works crew, George Akers of Material Design Build, architect Kirsten Thoft, Mike Hathaway of Revival Construction Co, landscape artist Peter Soderman, and small world coffee owner Jessica Durrie, to make Mayor Lempert’s vision a reality and build a beautiful parklet for the town to enjoy.

The parklet will be in place for 2-4 months. An official opening ceremony and dedication of the parklet will be held on June 4th at 5pm at the site on Witherspoon Street in front of small world coffee.

The Arts Council of Princeton, founded in 1967, is a non-profit organization with a mission of Building Community through the Arts. Housed in the landmark Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, designed by architect Michael Graves, the ACP fulfills its mission by presenting a wide range of programs including exhibitions, performances, free community cultural events, and studio-based classes and workshops in a wide range of media. Arts Council of Princeton programs are designed to be high-quality, engaging, affordable and accessible for the diverse population of the greater Princeton region.

 

Valid from 06/01/2015 to 08/01/2015

New York City's First Comedy Couple at Catch a Rising Star This Weekend

07/14/2015

This weekend 
 

New York City's First Comedy Couple

Joe Narvaez and Christie Pasqua

SiriusXM Radio, Live at Gotham, Carolines on Broadway, Stand Up NY

Friday 8pm

Saturday 8pm 

           

Catch Princeton

102 Carnegie Ctr

Princeton, NJ

609-987-8018

 

FOR COMPLETE LISTINGS, VISIT

Valid from 07/14/2015 to 07/19/2015

Tennis Tournament to Support Montgomery First Responders at the Nassau Tennis Club

01/27/2013

The Nassau Tennis Club is hosting a Presidents Weekend Tennis Tournament from Saturday, February 16 – Monday, February 18 at Nassau Tennis Club’s indoor tennis facility located at 1800 Route 206, Skillman, NJ.

The tournament is for adults 18 and over.  The event will include Doubles and Singles events for Men and Women at USTA levels ranging from 3.0 to 4.0.  The deadline to register for the tournament is February 3, 2013.

Nassau Tennis Club is suggesting that players make a donation to support Montgomery First Responders (Montgomery EMS, Police Department, Fire Company #1 & #2).  For every dollar donated by tournament participants, the Nassau Tennis Club will match up to $2,000.

“Nassau Tennis Club is proud to be part of the Montgomery community and appreciates the hard work and dedication of our First Responders. This tournament is a great way to compete, have fun and give back to the community,” says Benton Camper, Owner & Manager of the Nassau Tennis Club.

To learn more, register for the tournament or make a donation, visit www.NassauTennis.Net

 

Valid from 01/27/2013 to 02/19/2013

Washington Crossing Park Association New Jersey Announces its First Educational Program in Celebration of George Washington’s Birthday

01/31/2015

Washington Crossing Park Association Announces:

“After the Crossing: New Jersey in the American Revolution”

Washington Crossing Park New Jersey-February 2, 2015

The new non-profit group Washington Crossing Park Association, Inc. of New Jersey announces its first community-wide educational symposium to celebrate George Washington’s birthday on Sunday, February 22 from 2:00-6:00 p.m.  The program entitled “After the Crossing: New Jersey in the American Revolution” will be held at the Union Fire House in Titusville on River Road, a short distance from Washington Crossing Park.

The three-part lecture series and commentary will focus on New Jersey’s role during the American Revolution beginning with Washington’s famous crossing and exploring the Battle of Monmouth and War in the Watchungs. Featured speakers include historians Larry Kidder, Tim Nist and Mark DiIonno with Dr. Richard Veit, Department Chair of History at Monmouth University serving as moderator.  Also in attendance will be George Washington himself, portrayed by well-known re-enactor Sam Davis. General Washington will add personal perspective to the speakers’ lectures and he will include his thoughts on the importance of the New Jersey in the American Revolution. 

The afternoon talks, scheduled to run a half hour each, will be followed by commentary and questions from the audience. The event will include book sales from the historians present and information tables about Washington Crossing Park and the Washington Crossing Park Association, a newly formed friends group of the Park. The audience is invited to meet the speakers after the program while refreshments are served.

Anyone interested in attending may pre-register by contacting Mr. Bill Marsch @ wrmarsch@earthlink.net or attendees may register the day of the program.  A ten dollar donation is requested; members of the W.C.P.A. are free but must pre-register.

 All proceeds are earmarked to support Washington Crossing Park Association and its efforts to support the Park.  To learn more about this event or the mission of the Washington Crossing Park Association contact the group through its website: www.washingtoncrossingparkassociation.com

Valid from 01/31/2015 to 02/23/2015

Tulpehaking Nature Center Announces "First Friday Story Time" This Fall

08/25/2015

HAMILTON, N.J.—This fall, the Mercer County Park Commission’s Tulpehaking Nature Center will be hosting a new program series to encourage family bonding through a love of nature. First Friday Story Time will take place at 10:30 a.m. the first Friday of every month, starting Sept. 4. Geared for families with children between 4 and 8 years old, First Friday Story Time offers a great way to spend time with your child while they have fun learning about the natural world around them.

 

The Mercer County Park Commission’s Naturalist staff and educators have selected the very best stories to foster the imagination and help children appreciate nature and the legacy of the Lenape Indians who lived in the Abbott Marshlands. A craft or activity will follow to encourage further exploration of the story’s theme. Story time will be held rain or shine, whether outside in the open-air classroom of nature or inside by the warm and welcoming fireplace.

 

First Friday Story Time sessions are free with donations accepted to benefit the Friends of Mercer County Parks, which supports education programs at the nature center.

 

The Tulpehaking Nature Center is located at 157 Westcott Ave. in Hamilton. Starting September 2015, the nature center is open Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m.

 

The nature center provides programs and exhibits that encourage visitors to explore and discover the many cultural, historic and natural resources of the Abbott Marshlands. It is owned by the County of Mercer and operated by the Mercer County Park Commission. For more information about the nature center, programs and schedule of events, call (609) 888-3218 or go to www.mercercountyparks.org.

 

 

 

Valid from 08/25/2015 to 09/30/2015

First Annual 5K Run for Mercer County Parks in Mercer Meadows October 4, 2015

09/10/2015

PENNINGTON, N.J.— The Friends Mercer County Parks is proud to announce The First Annual Run for Mercer County Parks 5K on Sunday, October 4, 2015.

 

The flat and fast 5K course will start and end in the beautiful Rosedale Park District of Mercer Meadows, in Hopewell Township, NJ. The race will start at 9 a.m. and will be rain or shine. Registration for the event is required and can be done online at: https://cgiracing.webconnex.com/MercerCountyPark5k; cost to register is $30. Registration can also be done the day of the race at 7:30 a.m. for $35; no new registrations will be accepted after 8:45 a.m. The runner field will be limited to 500 participates.

 

"We are very excited to host this 5K run to benefit the Friends of Mercer County Parks," said President, Joseph Schmeltz. "This 501c3 non-profit organization supports the Mercer County Park Commission and has helped enhance and expand some of the programs and offerings we strive to give park visitors."

 

Early packet pick-up for bib numbers, timing chips and commemorative event shirts (while supplies last) will be held at The Historic Hunt House at 197 Blackwell Road, Pennington, NJ 08534, on Friday, October 2 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Packets can also be picked up on location the day of the race starting at 7:30 a.m.

 

There is limited parking at the Rosedale Park District of Mercer Meadows, please consider carpooling and arrive early. The race will be electronically chip timed and results will be posted at the conclusion of the race and also available online. No strollers, dogs or bikes will be allowed on the course.

 

The Friends of Mercer County Parks is a 501c3 non-profit organization that supports all the parks in Mercer County. Founded in 2013 the Friends of Mercer County Parks has helped to enhance and expand the many offering throughout that the Mercer County Park system, from programs to equipment and education of the staff.

 

Rosedale Park District of Mercer Meadows is owned by the County of Mercer and operated and maintained by the Mercer County Park Commission. The Mercer County Park Commission manages diverse offerings within its more than 10,000 acres of parks, recreational facilities, and open space throughout Mercer County. Mercer Meadows, where the First Annual Run for Mercer County Parks will take place, consists of more than 1,600 acres, divided among five separate districts. Miles of mowed and gravel trails provide visitors and their families with scenic walking and biking routes through the meadows and woodland. Fishing is a popular activity at the park's four water bodies.  For more information, please visit www.mercercountyparks.org.

Valid from 09/10/2015 to 10/05/2015

'Twas the Night Before Christmas' Is First Up in December at MCCC’s Kelsey Theatre

11/24/2015

West Windsor, N.J. – Three family shows are coming to Mercer County Community College’s (MCCC’s) Kelsey Theatre in December that will add to the festive holiday season. The month kicks off with a Kelsey holiday tradition. "'Twas the Night Before Christmas" embraces the joy of the long-awaited midnight visit by none other than Santa. Family audiences will delight in the Kelsey Players' musical adaptation of the famous poem by Clement Moore, originally penned as a Christmas present for his children. The show features Kris Kringle, along with his eight tiny reindeer, some remarkably talented sugar plums, and the cutest mouse in New York City. The Moore family and their neighbors will create a magical winter wonderland circa 1822 New York for audiences of all ages to enjoy.

Performance dates and times are Friday, Dec. 4 at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 5 at 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 6 at 2 and 4 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults, and $10 for seniors, students and children. Kelsey Theatre is located on the college’s West Windsor Campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. The theater is an official drop-off site for the Marine's Toys for Tots annual holiday drive.  Patrons are encouraged to donate a new, unwrapped toy in the drop box located in the Kelsey Theatre lobby.  Donations will be accepted through Monday, Dec. 14.

The "Twas" cast stars Ken Ambs of Newtown, Pa., as Clement Moore; Diane Wargo of Ewing as Eliza Moore; Carter Erickson of Yardley, Pa., as William Moore; Abby Scatena of Robbinsville as Charity Moore; and John Costello of Hamilton Square as Mr. Kringle.

Also featured are Jillian Ambs of Newtown, Pa., Logan Ambs of Newtown, Pa, Mason Ambs of Newtown, Pa., Jayden Anderson of Trenton, Taylor Bell of Hightstown, Alex Bischoff of Hamilton Square, Aimee Clark of Lawrenceville, Hayden Clark of Lawrenceville, Melissa Clark of Lawrenceville, Charlotte Erickson of Yardley, Pa., Bridget Godfrey of Robbinsville, Alexa Hunt of Manahawkin, Freddie Iezzo of Hamilton, Luddy Iezzo of Hamilton, Marla Iezzo of Hamilton, Mateo Iezzo of Hamilton, Makenzie Ivey of Lawrenceville, Peyton Ivey of Lawrenceville, Alexander Johnson of Hamilton, Christian Johnson of Hamilton, Quinzy McCallum of Ewing, Cameron Miller of Morrisville, Pa., Chandler Miller of Morrisville, Pa., Cameron Reardon of Cream Ridge, Leif Simonelli of Hamilton, Rilyn Szabo of Monmouth Junction, Isabel Urban of West Windsor, Tobias Urban of West Windsor, and Zachary Urban of West Windsor.

The production team includes Director Diane Wargo, Musical Director Pat Masterson, Choreographer Chelsea Wargo, Stage Manager Ginny McGowen and Assistant Stage Manager Tara Simonelli. Lighting and sound design is by Bernie McGowen and costumes are by Kate Pinner.

Next up, for two shows only, is “A Very Kelsey Christmas,” a premiere performance presented by Forté Dramatic Productions, on Saturday, Dec. 12 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 13 at 2 p.m. Musical Director Peter de Mets presents an all-star cast of Kelsey performers in the style of a 1950s television variety show. It’s a mix of traditional, Broadway and pop favorites, plus skits and lots of cheer. Tickets are $18 for adults; $16 for seniors, and $14 for children/students.

Capping off the season is the New Jersey Youth Ballet’s original hour-long, narrated adaptation of "The Nutcracker" on Friday, Dec. 18 at 7 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 19 at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 20 at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Dancers in full costume will perform to the famous Tchaikovsky score as they transport audiences to The Land of the Sweets. Tickets are $16 for adults, and $14 for seniors, students and children.

Tickets for all shows may be purchased by calling the Kelsey Box Office at 609-570-3333 or online at www.kelseytheatre.net  Kelsey Theatre is wheelchair accessible. Free parking is available next to the theater.

Valid from 11/24/2015 to 12/07/2015

Sign up Now for Awesome School of Rock Summer Camp - 20% Off First Month Tuition and 20% Off All Camps

03/20/2013

Amplify Your Summer

 

Make your Summers ROCK!  Students ages 7-17 work one on one and in groups with our pro instructors to perform a REAL show at the and of the session.  Summer Daytime Sessions are 10am - 3pm Monday - Friday.  Shows are usually in the evening after the last day of the session.  Our Summertime intensive day are great for beginner to advanced players.  If you're looking to improve for lessons in GUITAR, DRUMS, BASS, KEYBOARDS or VOCALS - Sign up NOW!

20% Off First Month Tuition and 20% Off  All Camps!!!

609-890-7090

 

ONLINE REGISTRATION FORM

 

Basic camp description: M-F 10AM - 3PM (early drop off times are available upon request for a small charge)
Our summer sessions are a great way to learn guitar, drums, bass, keyboard (piano), or vocals whether your a beginner with little or no experience to a veteran School of Rock student. Students spend 1 on 1 time with instructors learning songs and techniques so that we can put it all together in a group and perform a mini-concert at the end of the session. Camps focus on the Rock n Roll greats such as Led Zeppelin, The Who, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Black Sabbath, Foo Fighters, Nirvana, and more.

 
 
 
View Attachment
 
 
Dave Grohl Camp - June 24-28
Could Dave Grohl be the last true ROCK STAR?  Not if we can help it!   We'll spend 1 full week learning songs from Dave's career from the bands Nirvana, Foo Fighters, Queens of the Stone Age, Tenacious D, and Them Crooked Vultures.  Spend some 1 on 1 time with our staff of ROCKERS, as well as work in a group with other musicians to put on a mini-concert at the end of the session.  Great for all levels of guitar, bass, drums, keys, and vocals.  Camps are a great jump-start for new learners and students who want to try out new instruments as well as a good booster for the seasoned rockers.  
1 week $545
 
 
 
View Attachment
 
 
Led Zeppelin Camp - July 8-19 SOLD OUT
2 Weeks of all things ZEPPELIN!  These guys wrote the book on Rock n Roll, so if you're even thinking about performing music in any style, you NEED this camp.  Spend some 1 on 1 time with our staff of ROCKERS, as well as work in a group with other musicians to put on a mini-concert at the end of the session.  Great for all levels of guitar, bass, drums, keys and vocals.  If you want to sing your heart out, shred some lead on guitar or rip some fills on drums, this is the camp for YOU!
2 weeks $990
 
 
 
View Attachment
 
 
The Beatles Camp - July 29-Aug 9
Everyone LOVES the Beatles.  UK songwriting masters from the timeless British Invasion era pop songs to the songs that set the tone for the psychedelic sixties.  Great show for learning vocal harmonies, intricate guitar work, and how to structure timeless rock songs.  Spend some 1 on 1 time with our staff of ROCKERS, as well as work in a group with other musicians to put on a mini-concert at the end of the session.  Great for all levels of guitar, bass, drums, keys, and vocals.
2 weeks $990
 
 
 
View Attachment
 
 
Black Sabbath Camp - Aug 19-23
One week of learning classic from the METAL band who paved the way for all metal to follow.  Learn to SING like OZZY, DRUM like Bill Ward, play GUITAR like Tony Iommi, or make your BASS growl like Geezer Butler.  Spend some 1 on 1 time with our staff of ROCKERS, as well as work in a group with other musicians to put on a mini-concert at the end of the session.  Great for all levels of guitar, bass, drums, keys, and vocals.  
1 week $545
 
 
 
View Attachment
 
 
The Who vs The Rolling Stones Camp - Aug 26-30
Feelin' like you need some British Invasion this summer?  What better way to compare and contrast these two ICONs then to actually play classic songs.  We'll look at entire careers of both groups as they carve their way to fame and change styles into the 80's.   Spend some 1 on 1 time with our staff of ROCKERS, as well as work in a group with other musicians to put on a mini-concert at the end of the session.  Great for all levels of guitar, bass, drums, keys, and vocals.
1 week $545
 

Valid from 03/20/2013 to 05/30/2013

Two Princeton Day School Lego Robotics Teams Win First Place in First Lego League Competition

01/11/2016

Two Princeton Day School Middle School Lego Robotics Teams competed in the First Lego League Competition at Salem Community College on January 9, and won first place in Research and Presentation. The teams will advance to the Championship competition at Delaware State University on February 20. Two PDS students compete: Neel Adusumilli ’22 (Skillman) and Will Sun ’22 (Basking Ridge).

 

Princeton – Two Princeton Day School Lego Robotics teams from the Middle School won the first place Research Award and the first place Presentation Award at the First Lego League competition held at Salem Community College on January 9. The teams, under the expert guidance of coaches US Technology Coordinator Wei-hsing Wang and Technology Support Specialist Dean Acquaviva, teams were chosen to advance to the Championship competition at Delaware State University, which will take place on February 20.

On announcing the news, Head of Middle School Renée Price noted, “The group has been on quite a journey over the past four months as they have prepared for competition and overcome many obstacles. Please join me in congratulating our students and faculty members on this achievement.”

Valid from 01/11/2016 to 02/15/2016

WILDLIFE CENTER INC., Hosts First Annual Benefit May 4, 2013

03/12/2013

On Saturday, May 4, 2013 the WILDLIFE CENTER INC., will host its First Annual Benefit which raises critical resources to support the Mercer County Wildlife Center. The Spring for Wildlife Fest, a Food and Wine Tasting Benefit will be held at Baldpate Mountain, Fiddler's Creek Road, Titusville, New Jersey, from 2:00 PM to 6:00 PM.
 

Save the Date

WILDLIFE CENTER INC. is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization that supports the efforts of the Mercer County Wildlife Center. The Mercer County Wildlife Center is operated by the County of Mercer, New Jersey. It is a state and federally licensed facility that cares for injured, ill, and displaced native wildlife.  There are seven veterinarians who donate their time; we have an intake of 2,200 animals per year; a release rate of 50%   60 % (well above the national average); 12,000 incoming calls per years; a community outreach of 100,000 through the school children; and 150 volunteers.   All services provided by the Center are free of charge to those who call us for advice or bring animals in need of care.  Although all services we provide are free of charge to those who bring animals in need of care, we greatly appreciate donations. 

Valid from 03/12/2013 to 05/05/2013

Tennis Tournament to Support Montgomery First Responders at the Nassau Tennis Club

01/19/2015

Skillman, NJ (January 18, 2015) – Nassau Tennis Club is hosting the 3rd Annual Presidents' Day Weekend Community Tennis Tournament from Saturday, February 14 – Sunday, February 15 at Nassau Tennis Club's indoor tennis facility located at 1800 Route 206, Skillman, NJ.

 

The tournament is for adults 18 and over. The event will include Doubles, Mixed Doubles and Singles events for Men and Women at USTA levels ranging from 3.0 to 4.0. The deadline to register for the tournament is Monday, February 9, 2015.

 

Nassau Tennis Club is suggesting that players make a donation to support Montgomery First Responders (Montgomery EMS, Police Department, Fire Company #1 & #2). For every dollar donated by tournament participants, the Nassau Tennis Club will match up to $2,000.

 

"Nassau Tennis Club is proud to be part of the Montgomery community and appreciates the hard work and dedication of our First Responders. This tournament is a great way to compete, have fun and give back to the community," says Benton Camper, Owner & Manager of the Nassau Tennis Club. 

 

To learn more, register for the tournament or make a donation, visit www.NassauTennis.Net

 

The Nassau Tennis Club is a family owned business that has been providing tennis, fitness and sports programs to the Greater Montgomery, Hillsborough and Princeton area for nearly 40 years. Located in Skillman, NJ, the facility has 10 indoor hard courts, 5 outdoor Har-Tru courts, pro shop, pool and a club house with locker rooms, viewing areas, babysitting, workout rooms and an area for socializing & parties. Nassau offers tennis programs for adults and juniors at all levels including instructional clinics, private lessons, leagues, travel teams, USTA teams, fitness programs and social events.

Valid from 01/19/2015 to 02/16/2015

Special Vera Bradley Offer UPSTAIRS at The Front Porch in Pennington

03/22/2013

Valid from 03/22/2013 to 03/25/2013

A Guide For Getting Through Emergency Home Repairs

09/08/2011

ARAcontent

(ARA) - A surprise can be fun on some occasions, like your birthday. But when it comes to home repair emergencies, a surprise is the last thing you want - especially in these economically challenging times.

Unfortunately, this is a situation all too many homeowners find themselves in after a home emergency. Often they discover that a repair they assumed would be covered by their home insurance or local utility is actually their responsibility to fix.

From water and drainage systems to electrical and heating/cooling configurations, your home is a complex network of pipes, wires and electrical components that could require an emergency repair at any time.

An outside water pipe breaking or a sewer line collapsing can easily rank as a homeowners' worst nightmare; however, when an emergency occurs, most homeowners are not aware of who is responsible for the damage. In fact, less than 50 percent of the homeowners in a recent national survey, conducted by GfK Roper Custom Research, knew that they were responsible for repairs to the water line between their house and the street.

This is where companies that offer emergency home repair plans, such as HomeServe USA, can make the difference between peace of mind and an expensive and time-consuming repair.

"According the results of the survey, one third of all homeowners responding assumed that their local utility was responsible for the cost of a burst water line between their house and the street, when this is usually not the case," says Tom Rusin, chief executive officer of HomeServe USA. "One of the challenges of home ownership is that the potential for expensive repairs is always out there. In fact, repairing a water service line can cost more than $2,000 and simply clearing a blocked drain can cost upwards of $350."

Rusin suggests that all homeowners do the following things to minimize the potential financial liability and hassle associated with home repair emergencies:

1. Speak to your homeowners insurance agent to get a clear understanding of which areas of your home are covered by your insurance policy and which ones are not. Potential trouble spots include interior and exterior electrical wiring, outside water service and sewer lines, inside plumbing and gas piping, central heating and air conditioning systems, and the water heater.

2. Similarly, speak to your local electric, gas, and water utilities to determine equipment that you may be responsible for. As mentioned earlier, the water and sewer lines that run underneath the lawn are the responsibility of the homeowner in the vast majority of cases.

3. Proper maintenance of home components greatly minimizes the chance of an unexpected emergency. For example, check the air filter on your central heating or cooling system regularly and change it about once every three months during the season. Protect water pipes from freezing with proper insulation or draining them prior to winter. And fix leaky faucets and toilets to save water and prevent bigger problems.

4. Consider a home emergency protection plan that can relieve you of not only the financial burden of a home emergency, but also the uncertainty involved in looking for a repair person on a Sunday afternoon.

"The more prepared homeowners are for a home repair emergency, the more peace of mind they'll have and the more time they can spend enjoying their house with their families," says Rusin.

Valid from 09/08/2011 to 09/08/2012

Men Mentoring Men to Host First NJ Conference on Men and Masculinity Nov 4 - 5

10/07/2016

Princeton/Somerville/Lambertville, NJ (Oct. 6, 2016) – Men Mentoring Men (M3), a secular non-profit New Jersey organization dedicated to helping men live happier, healthier lives is hosting the first NJ Conference on Men and Masculinity, Friday, November 4 to Saturday, November 5, 2016 in Princeton, NJ. Open to both men and women, students, helping professionals and educators, the conference brings an exciting lineup of noteworthy speakers, including bestselling author Michael Kimmel, Ph.D., one of the world's leading experts on men and masculinities.

 

Dr. Kimmel's Friday night keynote, "Men and Masculinity in a Changing World" will explore the rich diversity of men's lives and how the majority of sensitive males who want to change do not know how. They are doubtful as to what it means exactly to act as caring fathers or caring friends, to respond nonviolently when faced with aggression, or to behave as equal partners without losing their masculinity in relationships, the workplace and the world at large.

 

"Conforming to traditional ideas of masculinity may be hazardous to our health, but it is also hazardous to the health of our wives, partners and children," said Dr. Kimmel in his Huffington Post blog. "We need to help men reduce the power of gender policing — the fear that other men will see us as less than manly if we listen to the voices in our own hearts about how we want to live our lives."

 

Dr. Kimmel is among the leading researchers and writers on men and masculinity today. The author of more than 20 books, including Manhood in America, The Gendered Society, The History of Men, and Guyland, Dr. Kimmel serves as Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University, where he directs the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities. A tireless advocate of engaging men to support gender equality, Kimmel has lectured at more than 300 college, universities and high schools.

 

"The men and masculinity conference will provide the opportunity to learn specifics about the male experience in our society within a historical context through presentations and interactive workshops across various perspectives from a mix of men, women, educators and helping professionals both young and old in order to increase our understanding of masculine behaviors and practices," says Robert Hackman, president of Men Mentoring Men, which is based in Somerville, NJ and New Hope, PA. "We are thrilled to have such dynamic keynote speakers and facilitators to educate us on the changing face of men and masculinity."

 

Interactive Conference Workshops include:

 

"Building Connections:  An Experiential Workshop in Gender Empathy" presented by Holly Barlow Sweet, Ph.D., co-director of the Cambridge Center for Gender Relations.

 

"How to Find a Balance in Our Stressful Lives" presented by Ken Verni, Psy.D., Director of the NJ Center for Mindful Awareness.

 

"Men and Happiness" presented by Dr. Ed Adams, founder of Men Mentoring Men.

 

"Looking for Love in All the Right Places" presented by Marilee Adams, Ph.D., author of Change Your Questions, Change Your Life: 12 Powerful Tools for Leadership, Coaching and Life and founder of the Inquiry Institute.

 

Saturday's program will conclude with a Men Mentoring Men meeting for male attendees and a "More Than Men" mentoring meeting that is open to all attendees.

 

The NJ Conference on Men and Masculinity will be held at the Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. To register for the conference, visit Men Mentoring Men. For more information, email Robert Hackman, roberthackman5@gmail.com or call (484) 800-2203. Space is limited. Early registration for the Friday presentation by Dr. Michael Kimmel is $55; the Saturday program is $180; and both days are $215.

 

For more information on Men Mentoring Men, visit www.menmentoringmen.org.

 

About Men Mentoring Men (M3)

Men Mentoring Men, located in Somerville and Lambertville, is a self-sustaining council of thoughtful men dedicated to participation in and appreciation of the triumphs and failures of life's journey by enriching the lives of each other, those they love and the community at large. Mentoring is an honest and shameless exchange of acquired wisdom encompassing the exploration of the myth, mystery and magic of life. M3 is a secular group not affiliated with any religious orientation.

 

Valid from 10/07/2016 to 11/06/2016

Prevention Coalition of Mercer County and Mercer Council Hold First Annual Prevention Awards Breakfast

06/27/2014

Lawrence Township, NJ June 25, 2014 -   Several community stakeholders were recognized at a special breakfast event honoring their commitment to fighting substance abuse in Mercer County.    The event was held at Mercer Council, which is the location of the Prevention Coalition of Mercer County.  The Coalition brings people together from across the county to develop interventions in the community to prevent substance abuse and related problems.

 

Those who were honored with plaques for their efforts in drug prevention were Freeholder Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr., CVS Pharmacy, Mercer County Prosecutors Office Special Investigation/Gang Unit and Joe Canal's Discount Liquor Outlet.   

 

Each year, the Partners in Prevention committee will request nominations to acknowledge individual efforts that go above and beyond the call of duty to protect Mercer County residents from substance abuse.  Organizers said they were very proud to honor "these extraordinary organizations and people."

 

The Prevention Coalition of Mercer County has been in operation since 2012.  The Coalition brings people together from across the county to develop interventions in the community to prevent substance abuse and related problems.  For more information on how to get involved in the coalition, call Barbara Sprechman at 609-396-5874.

 

About Mercer Council -- Mercer Council is a 501 © (3)  non-profit agency dedicated to the prevention of substance abuse. Mercer Council actively provides quality alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse prevention and early intervention services in partnership with individuals, families, schools, communities, businesses and professionals throughout Mercer County.

Valid from 06/27/2014 to 08/01/2014

Job Openings at Cherry Grove Farm, Fulper Farmstead, First Field and Jammin' Crepes

08/21/2014

We're sharing the news from four of our vendors that they're looking for some new team members who have a love for food and farms.

Cherry Grove Farm...Delivery Person / General Assistant.... Do you love farms and good food? Cherry Grove Farm is looking for a part-time person who can help with deliveries in the NY and Philadelphia areas and work with our cheese makers and retail staff. Must be reliable and flexible with a positive, customer-service attitude. Estimating 16 to 24 hours initially. Hourly pay rate, determined by experience. Must be able to lift 50lbs. Current DL required. Email your qualifications to cherrygrovefarmstore@gmail.com.

Fulper Family Farmstead...Sales and Marketing Manager position. Based at Fulper Family Farmstead LLC, Lambertville, NJ 08530, the job is to plan and implement direct sales and marketing activities, targeted towards prospective customers and existing customers so as to maintain and develop sales of Fulper Family Farmstead dairy products, summer camp, farm tours, birthday parties, and on-farm events, in accordance with business plans by performing the following duties personally or through hired employees. Email blf26@cornell.edu for more information.

First Field is offering a Paid Internship opportunity to someone who loves mission-driven food start-ups. Must be 18 years or older. For more information, email info@first-field.com

Jammin' Crepes is looking for team members to open their new shop on Nassau Street in Princeton soon! For more information about the position available at Jammin' Crepes, email info@jammincrepes.com.

Valid from 08/21/2014 to 09/01/2014

First Day of School September 4 at Princeton Public Schools

07/30/2014

Valid from 07/30/2014 to 09/05/2014

Central Jersey First Cash Mob Hits Lawrenceville, NJ April 30, 2012

04/27/2012

As you probably know, Cash Mobs are a new movement across the United States aimed at supporting local businesses and rebuilding communities.  A Cash Mob is a Flash Mob, but instead of singing, dancing or rioting, Cash Mobbers join together and each spend $20 at a local business.

April 30, 2012 “Central Jersey Cash Mob Monday” will be hosting its first Cash Mob in Lawrenceville, NJ. The three “Cash Mob” rules of engagement are 1) Spend $20 Dollars. 2) After the Cash Mob enjoy a local watering hole.  3) Meet 3 new people.  

The First two locations selected for the First Central Jersey Cash Mob are….

Cash Mob Venue 5:30 – 6:30 – Media Arrival 6:00 – Since it’s the first we have no idea of attendanceJ

Cherry Grove Farm

3200 Lawrenceville Road (Rte. 206)

Lawrenceville, New Jersey 08648

Store: (609) 219-0053  

Contact: Stacey Gentile

www.cherrygrovefarm.com

Cherry Grove Farm is a 600 acre Organic Farm. They make cheese and sell other local Jersey products.  It is also run by a great team and they really love their job and it shows when you visit!

 

Local Watering Hole – After they visit Cherry Grove Farm

Amalfis Restaurant.

146 Lawrenceville Pennington Road

Lawrenceville, NJ 08648

(609) 912-1599

Contact:  Luigi

Family Owned Restaurant Owned Since 2000

How did we pick the locations?  Well, nobody wants to be the “why did you pick them and not me” target.  So the selection process was created by getting advice from other Cash Mob hosts around the Country to learn best practices.   One of the suggestions was to have an anonymous committee to select the destinations.   So I created an incredible committee that are small business owners or work with small businesses to be part of the selection process – we started with submitting small businesses and everyone voted!

Once the Location was selected I had to contact venues and congratulations them that they had been selected to be Cash Mobbed and nobody knew what I was talking about because it hasn’t really hit New Jersey yet on a media scale.  Hopefully, our Central Jersey Media will help put this concept on the Map!  As you all know it’s important to create education to our communities on why it’s important to support not just local, but small businesses and here is a chance to get that theory moving.

Here is Cash Mob Rules & Guidelines set up by the originators of the concept!

http://cashmobs.wordpress.com/about-us/

Central Jersey Cash Mob – layout of how we work so if people ask we can send them a work in progress guideline until we find what works for us.

http://origin.library.constantcontact.com/download/get/file/1101424782383-1235/Who+is+Central+Jersey+Cash+Mob.pdf

 



Valid from 04/27/2012 to 05/01/2012

First House Tour of Trenton’s Hiltonia Neighborhood on May 5th, 2012

04/29/2012

Valid from 04/29/2012 to 05/06/2012

First Responder Speaks at MCCC’s 9-11 Remembrance

09/12/2012

Commemorating the 11th anniversary of September 11, 2001, dignitaries, guests, and Mercer County officials joined faculty, staff and students of Mercer County Community College (MCCC) on Sept. 11 to pay homage to those who perished, their families, and to the men and women who risked their lives to help those in need.

It is appropriate that this ceremony takes place at MCCC, a place where the dreams of freedom and opportunity are shared and nourished every day” said MCCC Board Chair Mark Matzen.

Sergeant Michael Yeh of the Lawrence Township Police Department, a rescue specialist and volunteer firefighter in Princeton Junction, presented a moving reflection about the days he served at the World Trade Center site as part of the NJ Urban Search and Rescue Team, working 12 hour shifts. “It was our job to locate people who tried to crawl under vehicles to escape the fallen buildings. Some of the trucks had been flattened to 3 feet.”

Yeh recalled his team’s efforts to rescue survivors and its disappointment to discover only bodies. He said his team got some satisfaction from being able to provide closure to families. “Every time a body was recovered, all stopped and gave due respect,” he said.

Following a moving invocation by Rev. Robert Wittick, who serves MCCC as chaplain, Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes addressed the assembled guests.  Wearing a tie covered with American flags, a gift from his son who told him to wear it July 4 and Sept. 11, Hughes said, “Even though he was only ten years old at the time, he recognized the gravity of a day like today. The spirit of community we saw that day should be the spirit of community as we move forward.”

MCCC President Patricia C. Donohue pointed out a section of steel beam from the World Trade Center that was displayed at the site. The New Jersey State Museum donated two beams to the college that were cut from impact zone steel after the attacks.  The beams have been permanently encased and installed at the college’s campuses in West Windsor and Trenton.

Alison Varra of Hamilton, a second-year MCCC music student, sang “The Star Spangled Banner” and closed the ceremony with “God Bless America.”

Valid from 09/12/2012 to 10/12/2012

Guidance for First-Time Gardeners

04/16/2013

BPT

(BPT) - Each year, thousands of first-timers will join the millions of seasoned gardeners who already know the satisfaction of picking a perfect tomato at its peak, serving up salads from greens just grown right outside the back door, or harvesting home-grown peppers and specialty herbs never even seen at the grocery store.

Most of us want that home-grown, healthy goodness that veggie and herb gardens provide, but sometimes it's hard to figure out just where to start. Diligent effort and smart investment can result in less-than-expected results, but starting your own produce plot and reaping its rewards is not out of your reach.

Even a small garden can fill your table with fresh, nutritious food, and help save money, too. In addition to the satisfaction you'll get from growing your own food, gardening delivers a host of other health benefits, from low-impact exercise to boosting vitamin D levels with the hours you'll spend in the sunshine.

Whether you start with a few containers on your patio, create a raised bed in a side yard or go big and plant a grand victory garden, gardening can be easy if you start with these six simple steps.

Step 1 - Pick transplants

While every plant starts from a seed, transplants make establishing your garden easier, and help ensure better success. Transplants, like Bonnie Plants which are grown regionally across the country and available at most garden retailers, nationwide, can trim six to eight weeks off growing time, and allow you to skip over the hard part of the growing process when plants are most vulnerable - so they're more likely to survive and thrive.

Bonnie Plants offers a wide variety of veggies and herbs, available in biodegradable pots, making the selection process easy. Plant what you eat and try some easy-to-grow favorites, like these:

* Easy herbs - The volatile oils that make herbs valuable in cooking also naturally repel many insects and garden pests. Try basils, parsley, rosemary and something new, like grapefruit mint, which tastes as refreshing as it sounds.

* Bell peppers - You'll find the Bell peppers grown in your own backyard will taste sweeter than those bought from your grocer. Harvest them green or red, when vitamin levels are higher. Bonnie offers the classic "Bonnie Bell," that's a productive proven winner.

* Eggplant - Eggplant thrives in hot weather. Try easy grow "Black Beauty" or something different like the white-skinned "Cloud Nine."

* Lettuce - Go for "leaf" lettuces like "Buttercrunch," "Red Sails," or Romaine. They'll tolerate more heat than head lettuces and if you keep picking the leaves you'll get multiple harvests.

* Summer squash - Squash are easy-grow too, and very productive. Try zucchini "Black Beauty" or new-for-2013 Golden Scallop Patty Pan Squash. Many gardeners call this the flying saucer squash because of its unique shape. The flavor is delicate and mild, similar to zucchini.

* Tomatoes - These crimson favorites are the most popular backyard vegetable. Choose disease-resistant "Better Boy," "Bonnie Original" or the extra-easy cherry tomato "Sweet 100."

Step 2 - Location, location, location

Be sure the spot you choose for your plants gets six to eight hours of sun.You don't need a lot of space to begin a vegetable garden. If you choose to grow in containers, you don't even need a yard - a deck, patio or balcony will provide plenty of space. The amount of space you require will depend on what you're planting and how many plants you intend to cultivate.

Sun-deprived plants won't bear as much fruit and are more vulnerable to insects and stress.

Step 3-- Suitable soil

Success starts with the soil. Most vegetables do well in moist, well-drained soil that's rich in organic matter like compost or peat moss. Adding organic material loosens stiff soil, helps retain moisture and nourishes important soil organisms.

Step 4-- Feed your food

All edible plants remove some nutrients from the soil, and can quickly exhaust soil without the help of a fertilizer. Since one of the reasons for growing your own vegetables is to control exactly what your family consumes, be sure to use all-natural, safe products like Bonnie Plant Food, which is derived from oilseed extract such as soybean seed extract. Research shows plants are healthier and more vigorous using organically based foods, rather than chemical based options.

Step 5 - Water well

Most vegetables aren't drought tolerant, so you'll need to water them regularly. The closer your garden is to a water source, the easier it will be to keep plants hydrated. One inch of water weekly is adequate for most vegetables.

Step 6 - Pest patrol

Let natural predators fight your battles, hand-pick pests or dislodge them with a jet of water. If you spray, do it late in the day when beneficial insects are less active.

You can find plenty of resources to help guide you through the planting process, from websites like www.bonnieplants.com to your local community college's agricultural extension. Read up, watch videos, take a class and get your hands dirty.

 

Valid from 04/16/2013 to 04/16/2014

Tickets Still on Sale for The American Boychoir's Taping of Popular NPR Program From the Top in Princeton

05/14/2013

As part of its 75th Anniversary celebrations, The American Boychoir will present From the Top, the pre-eminent showcase for young musicians heard weekly on NPR on Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium on the campus of Princeton University.   The popular NPR program, hosted by acclaimed pianist Christopher O'Riley, will feature The American Boychoir performing works by Maurice Duruflé, John Phillip Sousa, Johann Sebastian Bach and The Beatles in a first-ever taping in Princeton.  Also featured will be 16-year-old violinist Gallia Kastner from Arlington Heights, Illinois, performing the Waltz-Scherzo, Op. 34 by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, and 16-year-old cellist Julia Rosenbaum from Potomac, Maryland, performing Elégie, Op. 24, by Gabriel Fauré. Gallia and Julia will also join The American Boychoir for two performances by Johann Sebastian Bach.  From the Top airs locally on WWFM, The Classical Network on Saturdays at 11:00 AM; this episode will air nationally the week of June 3.

 

The American Boychoir’s appearance on From the Top will be the culmination of the Boychoir’s 75th Anniversary celebratory alumni weekend, May 17-19.  The 75th Anniversary weekend includes a Diamond Gala Benefit dinner and a performance of the Boychoir and its alumni at the Boychoir School’s new home, the Princeton Center for Arts and Education. The Gala dinner on Saturday May 18 will include both a live and silent auction, a performance by the Alumni Chorus, conducted by James H. Litton, and dessert with From the Top host Christopher O’Riley.  Alumni from throughout the country are expected to come to Princeton to celebrate the Boychoir’s 75-year commitment to musical performance, education and character, as well as highlights from the Boychoir’s illustrious international performing career. 


Tickets for the May 19 From the Top taping are available at www.princeton.edu/utickets or by phone at 609-258-9220.  


Celebrating its rich 75-year history as America’s premier concert boys’ choir, The American Boychoir has long been recognized as one of the finest musical ensembles in the country. Capitalizing on its trademark blend of musical sophistication, spirited presentation, and ensemble virtuosity, The Boychoir performs regularly with world-class ensembles, including The New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra, and The Boston Symphony, and is often featured with such illustrious conductors as James Levine, Charles Dutoit, and Alan Gilbert.

 

The American Boychoir is frequently invited to join internationally-renowned artists on stage, and the list of collaborators reflects the extraordinary range of the ensemble: from great classical artists such as Jessye Norman and Frederica von Stade to jazz legend Wynton Marsalis and pop icons Beyoncé and Sir Paul McCartney. The choir's young soloists are also in high demand and have joined forces with The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, The Cleveland Symphony Orchestra, and The Spoleto Festival, to name a few.


The Boychoir's standing as preeminent ambassadors of American musical excellence is maintained through an extremely busy touring schedule both nationally and abroad and through frequent television and radio guest appearances, most recently on NPR's From the Top, and on the weekly TV broadcast Music and the Spoken Word with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. Its legacy is preserved through an extensive recording catalog, which boasts over 45 commercial recordings and the launch of its own label, Albemarle Records. The choir’s most recent release, Journey On, was hailed by Fanfare magazine as “a fabulous recording, encompassing a remarkable range of music and styles, all of it performed with astonishing accuracy and élan, conveying at every turn a sense of discovery and an utter engagement with the music.”

 

Boys in fourth through eighth grades come from across the country and around the world to pursue a rigorous musical and academic curriculum at The American Boychoir School in Princeton, New Jersey. In addition to almost one hundred solo concerts, the 75th anniversary season includes performances of Bach St. Matthew Passion and Orff Carmina Burana with The Philadelphia Orchestra; Berg Wozzeck at Avery Fisher Hall with Philharmonia Orchestra of London; Holst The Planets with The New Jersey Symphony; and several other collaborations with exciting artists to mark the choir’s historic milestone.

 

What began as a radio experiment in 2000 quickly became one of the fastest growing and most popular weekly classical music programs on public radio. Broadcast on nearly 250 stations nationwide to an audience of nearly 700,000 listeners each week, From the Top has been described by the Boston Globe as, "an entertaining, accessible, and inspirational mix of outstanding musical performances, informal interviews, skits, and games, the show is a celebration of extraordinary musicians who happen to be teenagers leading fairly normal lives." Annually, From the Top's live tapings reach more than 20,000 live audience members of all ages across the United States.  


From the Top is an independent non-profit organization headquartered in Boston that celebrates the power of music in the hands of extraordinary young people: unleashing the potential of young musicians as leaders in the arts; trumpeting the role of music to impact and enrich lives; and inspiring and building new audiences with a deeper appreciation for classical music. Learn more at www.fromthetop.org.

Valid from 05/14/2013 to 05/20/2013

Mercer Rowing Club Shines in First Appearance at Royal Canadian Henley Regatta

08/15/2013

West Windsor, NJ - Princeton National Rowing Association’s Mercer Rowing Club (PNRA/Mercer) made its first appearance at the Royal Canadian Henley Regatta which took place in Saint Catharines, Ontario, Canada from August 4 to 11, 2013. The Henley Regatta is one of the largest rowing tournaments in North America and boasts a 131- year tradition of summer competition. Over 2,800 men and women from over 150 rowing clubs competed for Henley Gold.

“We entered the club to compete at Canadian Henley this year so our crews would have the opportunity to test themselves against a very high level of competition,” says Ted Sobolewski, manager of PNRA/Mercer rowing programs and varsity girls’ coach.  “Getting to the finals at Henley is a great accomplishment for any rower,” adds Sobolewski who has competed at Henley in past years as a rower and as a coach.

Of the 22 events they entered, Mercer Junior crews reached the finals in seven events.  The Mercer Juniors came up just short of gold medals, finishing second in three events:  Women’s Under 17 4+, Women’s Under 23 Lightweight 4-, and Men’s Under 19 8+. 

In the Women's U17 4+ event, Kate Hickey (Notre Dame HS), Rena White (Princeton HS), Catherine Porter (Hopewell HS), Haley Bork (Robbinsville HS), and coxswain Katarina Strough (Princeton HS) finished second behind gold-medal winning Brockville Rowing Club (Ontario) by 1.3 seconds.

Vicki Jorgensen (graduate of West Windsor-Plainsboro North HS), Rachel Calabro (Robbinsville HS), Geena Fram (Lawrenceville Prep HS), and White placed second in the Women’s U23 Lightweight 4-.  Jorgensen and White also teamed up for a third place finish in the Women’s U23 2-.

Another of Mercer’s impressive performances was seen in the Men’s Under 19 8+ event.  Finn Ludwig (West Windsor-Plainsboro South HS), Aaron Goodman (Princeton HS), Sean Kelly (West Windsor-Plainsboro South HS), Timothy Lee (graduate of Princeton HS), Elias Albiheira (Princeton, NJ), Brad Mills (Princeton HS), Connor Ilchert (Lawrence HS), Ron Haines (Hamilton High West), and coxswain Matt Perez (Robbinsville HS) finished second to Canada’s Don Rowing Club.  The crew is coached by PNRA/Mercer varsity boys’ coach and Masters’ coach Jimmy Newcombe.
 
For women’s team captain, senior coxswain Noa Rothstein (Council Rock High School), the semi-final heat of the Women’s U19 8+ event was the highlight of not only the Regatta, but the entire summer season.  In this race, Mercer had a photo finish with the Oakland Strokes (California) and St. Catharines (Ontario) crews.  The judges determined that Mercer had finished in third place, only 0.05 seconds behind Oakland Strokes, the crew that went on to win the event in the finals.  “The race made me extremely excited for the fall (season) because we really got a glimpse into our team’s potential.”  In addition to Rothstein, the crew consisted of Jorgensen,White, Calabro, Fram, Madeline Day (West Windsor-Plainsboro North HS), Porter, Katie Sessa (Mount Saint Mary Academy, Watchung), and Hickey.

The Mercer Masters also competed and reached the finals in four events.  The Women’s Masters C (age 43 to 49) 4+ finished second with the crew of Cheryl Baldino, Allison Lee, Sharon Waters, Kristin Tedesko, and coxswain Charles Gilbert.  The Women’s Masters D (age 50-54) 8+ finished second with the crew of Kristin Appelget, Cassandra Cohen, Baldino, Kathy Kalinowski, Susan Voorhees, Lee, Waters, Tedesko, and coxswain Madeline Alden. 

The mother-daughter duo of Susan Voorhees and Madeline Alden teamed up with Appelget, Cohen and Kalinowski to win a second silver medal in the Women’s Master D 4+. The Mixed Masters D 8+ finished third with a crew of Appelget, Neil Linzmeyer, Miles Truesdell, Charles Gilbert, Michael Vaccaro, Cohen, Voorhees, Kalinowski, and coxswain Kat Stough.

About the Princeton National Rowing Association
The Princeton National Rowing Association, a 501c3 organization, operates the Finn M.W. Caspersen Rowing Center located on the shores of Mercer Lake, Mercer County Park in West Windsor, New Jersey.  The Princeton National Rowing Association is dedicated to operating a world-class training site for our nation’s elite athletes, providing opportunities for area youth to excel in the sport of rowing and to expand rowing in the greater Mercer County area through community based programs.  PNRA runs the Mercer Junior Rowing Program which provides rowing opportunities for youth from over 30 area schools and the Mercer Masters Rowing Program which provides rowing opportunities for adults.  The center is a home to the USRowing National and Olympic Teams, as well as rowing clubs and schools. PNRA has teamed up with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County to provide mentors and rowing opportunities to the students of the Joyce Kilmer School. PNRA received generous support from University Orthopaedic Associates, Resolute Racing Shells, Killarney’s Publik House and Shavel Home Products.

For more information, contact Kristopher Grudt, tel: 609-977-1094, krisgrudt@rowpnra.org.
 

Valid from 08/15/2013 to 09/30/2013

Princeton Girlchoir's 6th Annual Children Making a Difference Benefit Concert Novemeber 17

10/21/2013

Instilling the idea that "everyone can make a difference" is the inspiration behind the Princeton Girlchoir's 6th annual Children Making a Difference benefit concert.  Associate Director Melissa (Keylock) Malvar started the tradition of the benefit concert in memory of her mother Adrienne Todd Keylock, who died in 1998.  According to Melissa Malvar, her mother "spent her professional life as a social worker, and her free time at church singing in the choir, so helping others and singing were her great joys. To honor her memory, I combined her lifelong passions, and began the Children Making a Difference benefit concert to help teach our singers that everyone can make a difference by using their time and talents to help others."  Each year, the benefit concert raises money for a different charitable organization in our community, and educates audiences about services the non-profits provide.

 

This year the concert will raise funds for One Simple Wish of Trenton, NJ. The children will experience first-hand how using their time and talents to help others makes the world a better place. The choristers use their joyful, powerful, collective voices to help others. Since the first Children Making a Difference concert five years ago, over $10,000 has been raised for area non-profits. The choir members also organized an October collection of over 250 personal care items for the Ohana Project at One Simple Wish.  

 

Princeton Girlchoir's 6th annual Children Making a Difference benefit concert, held at Trinity Cathedral Trenton, is one of the organization's signature concerts. The Grace Notes and Semi-Tones will perform, along with this year's guest choir, the Philadelphia Girls Choir, directed by Nathan Wadley. Admission is by donation, with a suggested donation of $10 per person. All donations directly benefit One Simple Wish. The event is held at host site of Trinity Cathedral of Trenton on November 17 at 3:30 p.m. More Girlchoir music can be heard in the air this November with the Quarter Notes performing at the Fall Choral Exchange in conjunction with the American Boychoir School Training Choir and the Newark Boys Chorus Apprentice Choir, with special guests the PGC Ensemble, on Sunday, November 3, 4:00pm at the Princeton Center for Arts and Education. Admission is free.

For further information, please contact the Princeton Girlchoir office at 609-688-1888, or visit www.princetongirlchoir.org. For more information on One Simple Wish, please visit www.onesimplewish.org.

______________________________________________________________________ 

 

More About the Princeton Girlchoir

 

The choir that Founder and Artistic Director Emeritus Jan Westrick started in 1989 as an after-school activity for a small number of girls interested in choral music has grown into the area's premier training and performance choir for over 200 girls aged 8 to 18. To date, Princeton Girlchoir's alumnae number more than 400 young women, many of whom continue to sing in their schools, churches, communities and on professional stages around the world.

 

Princeton Girlchoir presents a wide array of musical genres, conductors and composers. While honing their musicianship, our choristers begin life-long friendships, enjoy professional performance opportunities, and travel the world.

 

We are a family of six choirs, beginning with third-graders and including girls through their high-school years. Choristers from towns throughout Central New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania come together each week from September through May to rehearse, and they perform some four to twenty concerts throughout the year, depending upon their choir level. Members of the Concert Choir may also take part in the annual summer tour.

 

The Princeton Girlchoir makes powerful, graceful and joyous music, and music makes powerful, graceful and joyous girls. We are dedicated to presenting extraordinary treble music, while building artistry, confidence, and a life-long love of singing together.   

 
 


Valid from 10/21/2013 to 11/18/2013

Rocktober School Of Rock Special Sale - 10% Off Your First Month of Classes

10/07/2013

rocktobersalePRINCETON.jpg

Valid from 10/07/2013 to 11/01/2013

Mercer Rowing Club Takes First Place in Women’s High School Junior 8+ Event at Navy Day Regatta

10/17/2013

West Windsor, NJ - Princeton National Rowing Association’s Mercer Rowing Club (PNRA/Mercer) kicked off its fall racing season with a championship at the Navy Day Regatta on October 12 by its Women’s High School Junior 8+ crew. The Navy Day Regatta features a 2.5 mile head race on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, PA.  Over 2000 masters, collegiate, and high school athletes compete at the regatta, which was started in 1986 as a way to promote awareness of the US Navy and Marine Corp.

“We were determined to improve upon our third place finish last year,” said PNRA/Mercer girls’ team captain Beatrice Sclapari (Princeton HS).  “The Schuylkill River is a challenging course, but this year it was especially challenging because there was a lot of debris in the river from the recent storms.  We actually hit a log, but luckily it did not damage our boat.”

PNRA/Mercer finished the race first out of 18 boats with a time of 14:08, seventeen seconds ahead of the second place finisher, Merion Mercy Academy.  In addition to Sclapari, the Women’s High School Junior 8+ crew includes:  Rachel Calabro (Robbinsville HS), Rena White (Princeton HS), Kate Hickey (Notre Dame HS), Katie Sessa (Mount Saint Mary Academy, Watchung), Alex Natale (The Hun School), Christie Samios (Princeton HS), Haley Bork (Robbinsville HS), and coxswain Noa Rothstein (Council Rock HS).  The PNRA/Mercer varsity girls are coached by Ted Sobolewksi.
Other notable PNRA/Mercer finishes included the Women’s High School Junior JV 8+ (3rd place), Men’s Masters 4+ (2nd place), and Women’s Masters 8+ (2nd place).

PNRA/Mercer Men’s High School Junior 8+ crew was not able to defend its 2012 Navy Day championship.  A log in the river severely damaged the boat and prevented the crew from finishing the race this year.
PNRA/Mercer will travel to Boston, MA to compete at the Head of the Charles Regatta on Sunday, October 20.

About the Princeton National Rowing Association
The Princeton National Rowing Association, a 501c3 organization, operates the Finn M.W. Caspersen Rowing Center located on the shores of Mercer Lake, Mercer County Park in West Windsor, New Jersey.  The Princeton National Rowing Association is dedicated to operating a world-class training site for our nation’s elite athletes, providing opportunities for area youth to excel in the sport of rowing and to expand rowing in the greater Mercer County area through community based programs.  PNRA runs the Mercer Junior Rowing Program which provides rowing opportunities for youth from over 30 area schools and the Mercer Masters Rowing Program which provides rowing opportunities for adults.  The center is a home to the USRowing National and Olympic Teams, as well as rowing clubs and schools. PNRA has teamed up with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County to provide mentors and rowing opportunities to the students of the Joyce Kilmer School. PNRA received generous support from University Orthopaedic Associates, Resolute Racing Shells, Killarney’s Publik House and Shavel Home Products.

For more information, contact Kristopher Grudt, tel: 609-977-1094, krisgrudt@rowpnra.org.
 

Valid from 10/17/2013 to 12/15/2013

Mercer Rowing Club Takes First Place in Men’s High School 8+ Event and Women’s High School 4+ Event at Bill Braxton Regatta

11/13/2013

Princeton National Rowing Association’s Mercer Rowing Club (PNRA/Mercer) ended its fall racing season with its Men’s High School Varsity 8+ crew and Women’s High School 4+ crew winning trophies at the 40th Annual Bill Braxton Memorial Regatta on November 10th on the Cooper River in Camden County, NJ. Both events were 1500m races.

“This race was a must win for us,” stated senior co-captain Conner Ilchert (Lawrence HS). “Our 8+ last year had the first place finish snagged out from under them at the last second and that was an image that stuck with a lot of the guys who raced here today. Coach Newcombe's pre-race advice was pretty simple, ‘Treat it like a drag race and ride the lightning all the way through’. This race capped off a pretty successful fall season for the Varsity 8+ after the solid finish at the Head of the Charles and now a gold medal from the Braxton, we're all pretty psyched for the championship season come springtime.”

In addition to Ilchert, other members of the men’s 8+ who were awarded the Colletta Family Trophy were Sean Kelly (West Windsor-Plainsboro HS South), Aaron Goodman (Princeton HS), Finn Ludwig (West Windsor-Plainsboro HS South), Tom Walker (Princeton HS), Elias Abilheira (Princeton HS), Clint Hetzell (Monroe Township HS), Ron Haines (Hamilton High West), and coxswain Matt Perez (Robbinsville HS). 

Later in what turned out to be the last race of the day, Mercer’s Women’s High School 4+ battled wind gusts up to 25 mph and won the Braxton Family Trophy. The 4+ crew consisted of Rachel Calabro (Robbinsville HS), Rena White (Princeton HS), Alex Natale (The Hun School), Badia Shehab (Hopewell Valley Central HS) and coxswain Katarina Stough (Princeton HS).

After the Women’s High School 4+, the remaining races were canceled due the high winds and weather.

The Bill Braxton Memorial Regatta honors the spirit of Bill Braxton, a rower who was killed in an auto accident after his sophomore year at Marietta College. Proceeds from the regatta fund two scholarships for college rowers.

About the Princeton National Rowing Association
The Princeton National Rowing Association, a 501c3 organization, operates the Finn M.W. Caspersen Rowing Center located on the shores of Mercer Lake, Mercer County Park in West Windsor, New Jersey.  The Princeton National Rowing Association is dedicated to operating a world-class training site for our nation’s elite athletes, providing opportunities for area youth to excel in the sport of rowing and to expand rowing in the greater Mercer County area through community based programs.  PNRA runs the Mercer Junior Rowing Program which provides rowing opportunities for youth from over 30 area schools and the Mercer Masters Rowing Program which provides rowing opportunities for adults.  The center is a home to the USRowing National and Olympic Teams, as well as rowing clubs and schools. PNRA has teamed up with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County to provide mentors and rowing opportunities to the students of the Joyce Kilmer School. PNRA received generous support from University Orthopaedic Associates, Resolute Racing Shells, Killarney’s Publik House and Shavel Home Products.

For more information, contact Kristopher Grudt, tel: 609-977-1094, krisgrudt@rowpnra.org.

Valid from 11/13/2013 to 12/31/2013

BLAIRSDEN, One of America’s Truly Magnificent Estates Chosen as the Mansion in May for 2014

12/06/2013


December 4, 2013 – Morristown, New Jersey – The Women’s Association of Morristown Medical Center (WAMMC) is pleased to announce its 17th Mansion in May Designer Showhouse and Gardens at BLAIRSDEN, the largest estate ever built in the beautiful Somerset Hills, located in Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey. BLAIRSDEN, once the magnificent country home of New York financier, C. Ledyard Blair, will once again open its doors to the public as the Mansion in May for 2014.
 
Mansion in May is the signature fundraiser for the Women’s Association of Morristown Medical Center (WAMMC), having generated over $8 million for Morristown Medical Center since 1974.  WAMMC is excited to announce their “One Big House, Two Great Causes for Kids” campaign as proceeds from Mansion in May 2014 at BLAIRSDEN will benefit an expanded Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and a new Autism Center at the Goryeb Children’s Hospital located at the Morristown Medical Center.  These expanded facilities will help provide all children who come to the facility, the best care they can receive anywhere in the country.
 
Designed and constructed between 1898 and 1903, BLAIRSDEN, a 62,000-square-foot Louis XIV Chateau-style mansion, was the masterpiece of the renowned architecture firm of Carrere and Hastings, who also designed the New York Public Library, the Frick mansion in New York City, the U.S. Senate and House office buildings and several large mansions in Newport, Rhode Island.
 
C. Ledyard Blair, entrepreneur, sportsman and commodore of the New York Yacht Club, was the grandson of self-made multimillionaire, philanthropist and Princeton University benefactor, John Insley Blair, who made his fortune in mining and building much of American’s rail system.  BLAIRSDEN, which sits atop 30 acres of opulent terraced gardens with magnificent views of New Jersey’s horse country, was built as a grand country retreat for C. Ledyard Blair and his family.  It was the quintessential estate for entertaining guests and became a favorite destination of New York City’s elite during the Gilded Age.
 
Revisiting the elegance of yesteryear, BLAIRSDEN  will be brought to life again through the design inspirations of over 40 of the metropolitan areas leading interior designers.  Mansion in May will be open to the public from May 1 to May 31, 2014 and will be available for private tours and private events. Advanced tickets will be available online and at select local retail locations in early 2014.
To learn more about the Mansion in May 2014 and BLAIRSDEN, visit:  www.MansionInMay.org.

 About WAMMC: The WAMMC has been a driving force and supporting presence at Morristown Medical Center since its earliest days.  The Association has over 600 members and raises more than $700,000 annually for the hospital. Mansion in May is its most profitable event, generating over $8 million for Morristown Medical Center since the first Mansion in May in 1974.
WAMMC’s most recent 2012 Mansion in May at Glynallyn Castle in Morristown raised $1.3 million for a new Inpatient Hospice and Palliative Care Center at Morristown Medical Center.  The event involved over 1,000 individuals volunteering in excess of 12,000 hours in the Showhouse and Gardens. Over 27,000 visitors visited Glynallyn.

 
BLAIR
SDEN will be the 17th  Mansion in May

1974 ~ Upton Pyne, Bernardsville
1976 ~ Giralda, Madison
1980 ~ Schiff Estate, Mendham
1981 ~ Hollow Hill Farm, Convent
            Station
1986 ~ Evergreens, Morristown
1988 ~ Warren Estate, Bernardsville
1991 ~ Upton Pyne Revisited,    
            Bernardsville
1994 ~ Bayley-Ellard, Madison
1997 ~ Vail Mansion, Morristown
1999 ~ Knox Hill, Morris Township
2001 ~ Ellerslea, Morris Township
2003 ~ Cross Estate, Bernardsville
2006 ~ Ross Family Farm, Basking Ridge
2008 ~  Froh Heim, Far Hills
2010 ~  Fawn Hill Farm, Harding  
             Township
2012 ~  Glynallyn Castle, Morristown
2014 ~  BLAIRSDEN, Peapack

Valid from 01/15/2014 to 02/03/2014

Area Schools Set To Participate in Phillips’ Mill Community Association’s First Youth Art Exhibition

12/18/2013

The Phillips’ Mill Community Association is pleased to announce that it will be hosting a Youth  Art Exhibition this January.   Phillips’ Mill has always been dedicated to the promotion of the arts and for the past 84 years has hosted the prestigious and well known juried art exhibition for adult artists living within a 25 mile radius of the Mill.  Building on the success of the adult exhibition, Phillips’ Mill decided to initiate a Youth Art Exhibition.  It solicited interest in participating from the art departments at more than 30 high schools within a 25 mile radius of the Mill. 


Eleven high schools from Pennsylvania and New Jersey both public and private elected to participate.  They are: Central Bucks East (Buckingham, PA), Central Bucks West (Doylestown, PA), Conwell-Egan Catholic High School (Fairless Hills, PA), Holy Ghost Prep (Bensalem, PA), Council Rock High School North (Newtown, PA), George School (Newtown, PA), New Hope-Solebury High School (New Hope, PA), Solebury School (New Hope, PA), Ewing High School (Ewing, NJ), Princeton High School (Princeton, NJ) and The Pennington School (Pennington, NJ).


The Art Department at each school will choose 12 student works for the exhibition.  The exhibited art will include two and three dimensional works comprising painting, watercolor, collage, pastel, graphite, digital art that is not photography and sculpture.  Awards will be determined by the show’s juror, Marcia Weikert who holds a BS in Art Education from SUNY and an MFA in Painting and Printmaking from Tyler School of Art. 


The Youth  Art Exhibition will be open to the public on three successive weekends in January 2014, Sat. 11th and Sun. 12th, Sat. 18th and Sun. 19th, Sat. 25th and Sun. 26th. The exhibition will be open from noon to 5:00PM and admission is free.


The exhibition will be held at the historic Phillips’ Mill, 2619 River Road 2 miles north of New Hope, PA.
For additional information call 215-862-0582 or visit www.phillipsmill.org.
 

Valid from 12/18/2013 to 01/28/2014

Eagle Scout Project of Time and Outdoor Chairs Donated to Princeton Montessori School

12/18/2013

 

Princeton Montessori School students now have their own outdoor Reading Nook which was designed and built by Eagle Scout Candidate Yasin Ahmed '13.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

PRLog (Press Release) - Dec. 17, 2013 - PRINCETON, N.J. -- Princeton Montessori School now has its own outdoor Reading Nook for students to enjoy. Yasin Ahmed, Eagle Scout candidate, donated over 136 hours towards the installation of the beautiful Readers Nook and garden in the grounds of the school.

 

Dr. Maria Montessori’s quote, “The land is where our roots are.  The children must be taught to feel and live in harmony with the Earth,” provided Yasin’s starting inspiration.  In keeping with this quote, Yasin planned a quiet and peaceful outdoor sanctuary consisting of a reading nook of four Adirondack chairs, two tables, and a small garden to attract butterflies.

 

Along with the help of his Boy Scout troop and some adult advisors, Yasin’s project of building the chairs and tables and installing the small garden took him over 136 hours of work from June to October at a cost of $650. He began by developing detailed work plans and cost estimates, and enlisting his helpers.  Several local businesses donated or discounted some of the materials he needed.  After many hours of preparation and planning, both on site and in the workshop, he was ready to begin the work.

 

Yasin utilized the EDGE method of instruction with his troop members: Explain, Demonstrate, Guide, and Enable. He began each part of the construction and planting with an explanation of the task. The next step was his demonstration of how he would like each task to be completed. Along the way he was able to guide his helpers with small corrections as needed, enabling them to complete the various tasks on their own.

 

Each day that the weather cooperates, students and teachers are using the chairs at recess or when there is a need for a small meeting. They have enjoyed learning about the history of Adirondack chairs, which Yasin provided to them. The history of these chairs dates back to 1903 when the first chairs were made in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, fashioned from eleven pieces cut from one piece of hemlock or basswood.

 

Between the beginning of Yasin’s project and the installation, Yasin graduated from Princeton Montessori School and began his freshman year at Peddie in Hightstown. His project will live on and will be enjoyed by countless Middle School students in the years to come.

 

Valid from 12/18/2013 to 02/01/2014

Award-Winning Poet Jane Hirshfield to Spend Day, Speak at Stuart as Visiting Author

03/18/2014

PRINCETON, NJ – Award-winning poet, Jane Hirshfield, will be the featured author at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart’s sixth annual Lies, Light, McCarthy Visiting Author Program on April 3, 2014.


The public is invited to an after-school reading on Thursday, April 3, 2014 at 4:30 PM. 
A book signing and reception will follow. 
The event is free of charge.

Jane Hirshfield was elected as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets in 2012, and is one of the most important voices in American literature today.  Amongst other works, she is the author of seven collections of poetry, including: Come, Thief (2011), After, and Given Sugar, Given Salt, a finalist for the 2001 National Book Critics Circle Award.

“We are excited to welcome Jane Hirshfield to campus,” said Dr. Patty L. Fagin, head of school at Stuart. “Ms. Hirshfield’s work reflects an ethical and global awareness that fits well into Stuart’s mission to educate our girls to think globally, lead with integrity, and change the world.”

Ms. Hirshfield’s first poem was published in 1973, shortly after she graduated from Princeton University as a member of the first graduating class to admit women as freshmen. In the years that followed, she has received many of the highest honors in her field.

Jane Hirshfield's work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement, The Nation, Orion, The American Poetry Review, Poetry, seven editions of The Best American Poetry, four Pushcart Prize Anthologies, and many other publications. In addition to her poetry, Ms. Hirshfield has also published a book of essays and two important anthologies of poetry by women. As befits a Visiting Author to Stuart in its 50th anniversary year, one of those anthologies is Women in Praise of the Sacred: 43 Centuries of Spiritual Poetry by Women

As part of the Visiting Author Program, faculty members have spent months preparing, and students have studied her work; Stuart’s Senior Scholars have worked with Lower and Middle School girls, examining Ms. Hirshfield’s poetry, in preparation for her visit. In addition to the public reading, Ms. Hirshfield will meet with students of all ages at Stuart to share her expertise on the craft of writing. She will spend time with K-5 Lower School girls, share lunch with the Stuart Senior Scholars, and give a private reading to Middle and Upper School girls. 

About the Visiting Author Program: The Lies, Light, McCarthy Visiting Author Program is an annual event that was the dream of a former English department head and Stuart alumna, Victoria McCarthy ’71.  A fund was established after her death that is named for three former English department heads:  Betty Lies, Nancy Light and Victoria McCarthy. The goal of the program is to bring prominent authors to Stuart who will share their knowledge and experiences with the students. Past Visiting Authors include Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon (2009), best-selling novelist Jonathan Safran Foer (2010), Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jhumpa Lahiri (2011), award-winning poet Naomi Shihab Nye (2012), and award-winning novelist Edwidge Danticat (2013).

About Stuart: As the only all-girls school in Princeton, New Jersey, Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart is uniquely positioned to provide an environment where girls put academics first, are willing and able to take risks, and explore every opportunity. Nestled on 55 wooded acres, our challenging curriculum takes advantage of the way girls learn in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math—as well as the arts, humanities, and athletics. Celebrating 50 years, Stuart enrolls girls in K-12, and has a co-ed preschool and junior kindergarten program. Stuart is part of an international community of 150 Sacred Heart schools and is an independent Catholic school that embraces students of all faiths and backgrounds. Our graduates go on to become confident, intelligent and articulate leaders for positive change in our world. Visit www.stuartschool.org for more information.

Valid from 03/18/2014 to 04/04/2014

Mansion in May at Blairsden Opening Day May 1

04/25/2014

Morristown, NJ, April 25, 2014 – Mansion in May 2014 Designer Showhouse and Gardens will open its doors on May 1, 2014 at Blairsden in Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey. Mansion in May is the preeminent designer showhouse in the New Jersey-New York area, attracting over 25,000 visitors to the event, typically held every other year, and the signature fundraiser for the Women’s Association of Morristown Medical Center. Blairsden will be open to the public every day from May 1 through May 31, 2014 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

 

Blairsden, a Louis XIV Chateau-style mansion, was built as a country estate by New York financier and sportsman, C. Ledyard Blair in the years 1897-1903 and has been hailed as one of the finest examples of Beaux-arts architecture in the United States. Open to the public for the first time this May, this 62,000 square foot mansion features 14 foot tall ceilings, a grand marble staircase and dozens of carved fireplaces. 

 

“Blairsden has a fascinating history and was breathtaking even before its transformation by our designers over the last several months,” said Prudence Pigott, Co-Chair of Mansion in May. “Visitors to Mansion in May will be able to experience the wonders of New York’s Gilded Age while enjoying the beautiful work of more than 60 interior and landscape designers.”

 

Visitors can plan to spend the day and enjoy the historic wonder of Blairsden, which sits atop a mile-long private drive overlooking the spectacular Somerset Hills. A tour of Blairsden will begin with a walk along a 300-foot reflecting pool lined with Roman busts and, once inside the mansion, spectacular Baccarat chandeliers and sconces adorn The Grand Salon and the Billiard Room in celebration of the company's 250th anniversary. Other highlights of Mansion in May include a newly-restored and charming Walled Garden and magnificent Belvedere overlooking views for miles, and three custom kitchens. The exquisite interior design details are presented by over 55 top New York/New Jersey area designers who brought their best work to highlight the wonderful original features of this remarkable mansion, from painted murals to custom made furniture, antiques and original art. 

 

“The day doesn’t end after the tour of this historic mansion – visitors can also enjoy luncheon dining in our tented Conservatory Café ,” said Christie Gisser, Mansion in May Co-Chair. “And, there are also many fun and unique boutiques for those seeking something special.”

 

Mansion in May 2014 at BLAIRSDEN in Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey will be open for the month of May. Advance tickets are $40, available online until April 30. Tickets purchased online and at the door during May will be $50. Proceeds from Mansion in May at BLAIRSDEN will benefit two causes at Morristown Medical Center’s Goryeb Children’s Hospital: an expanded Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and a new Autism and Child Development Center. For tickets, to volunteer and to learn more about Mansion in May 2014 at BLAIRSDEN, visit www.MansionInMay.org

About the Women's Association of Morristown Medical Center (WAMMC)
WAMMC has been a driving force and supporting presence at Morristown Medical Center since its earliest days.  The Association has over 600 members and raises more than $700,000 annually for the hospital. Mansion in May is its most profitable event, generating over $8 million for Morristown Medical Center since the first Mansion in May in 1974.

Valid from 04/25/2014 to 06/01/2014

Lambertville Area Chamber of Commerce Announces First Ever Lambertville NiteFare Food Festival June 12

05/10/2014

LAMBERTVILLE, NJ - MAY 2, 2014—On June 12 th, 2014 from 5-10 pm, food lovers of all tastes are invited to Lambertville, NJ, a go-to dining and entertainment destination on the Delaware River, voted one of America’s 15 prettiest towns by Forbes Magazine. The Lambertville Area Chamber of Commerce (LACC), the City of Lambertville and Humdinger Events announce the first ever Lambertville Nite Fare featuring 15 area restaurants, 15 food trucks, and a beer garden offering three different types of draft beer from Yards Brewery. Lambertville NiteFare takes place on charming North Union Street, with its famous antique stores, popular restaurants, unique art galleries, and historic homes and gardens. North Union Street will be closed from Bridge Street to York Street and visitors will be able to choose from 30 food options.

“The LACC wants to let people in on New Jersey's best kept secret—Lambertville, NJ, voted one of America’s prettiest towns by Forbes,” says Wilson Weed, President of the Lambertville Area Chamber of Commerce. “We created NiteFare to bring in food lovers who may not know about Lambertville's status as a premier food destination with abundant choices and diverse options for dining and entertainment. We look forward to seeing Union Street packed with people enjoying an evening spent in Lambertville, NJ—and we are confident that NiteFare will convince them to return often.”  

NiteFare will benefit chamber members and area residents by drawing new people to town through an organized, popular event on North Union Street, the same venue for Lambertville’s well-known ShadFest.The food festival will additionally serve as a fundraising vehicle for the LACC’s nonprofit chamber members so that the entire community benefits from the event.    

Yard Brewery will feature three different kinds of craft beer to those interested in purchasing a drinking bracelet. All individuals seeking to purchase a beer bracelet will be verified by security and must show a valid ID. Look out for online menus which will highlight food offered during the event. 
For presale discounted tIckets or more details on this event, go to: https://hunterdonbucks.com/deals/nitefare/
For more information about the Lambertville Area Chamber of Commerce, go to: http://www.lambertville.org/

Valid from 05/10/2014 to 06/13/2014

Vera Bradley Sale Upstairs at The Front Porch

05/24/2014

PLUS - RECEIVE A FREE VERA BEACH TOWEL WITH VERA BRADLEY PURCHASE OF $125 OR MORE!!!

SATURDAY, MAY 28 - WEDNESDAY, MAY 28

 

Valid from 05/24/2014 to 05/29/2014

Princeton-Blairstown Center Welcomes Four New Trustees

07/14/2014

(Princeton, NJ, July 9, 2014)The Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) is proud to announce the appointment of four community leaders with experience in education, communications, design and non-profit management to three-year terms on its Board of Trustees - Jason Griffiths, Christina Bailey, Jim Farrin and William Wild.

 

PBC’s Board of Trustees is a highly committed group of individuals, from diverse backgrounds, responsible for setting policy and overseeing the organization's fiduciary commitments.

 

New members include:

 

Jason Griffiths graduated from Princeton University in 1997 and has spent most of his career in the field of education.  He is the Director of Programs at The National Academy of Advanced Teacher Education (NAATE).  Prior to joining NAATE, Jason was the founding head master of The Brooklyn Latin School (TBLS), a selective, public school on the border of the Bushwick and Williamsburg neighborhoods of Brooklyn.  One hundred percent of TBLS graduates have been accepted into a post-secondary program. In 2013, TBLS was ranked as the #1 high school in New York City and New York State by the US News and World Report.

 

Christina Bailey is a Communications Consultant with CC Communications where she provides project-based services.  She has applied her professional experience in strategic communications, project management and coalition building to her volunteer work at the Junior League of Greater Princeton (JLGP).  Christina has managed communications, community projects and volunteers for the Junior League as Communications Chair and as a two-term member of the JLGP Board, serving as Community Vice President.  She also serves as a member of the Marketing Committee of Volunteer Connect.

 

Jim Farrin graduated from Princeton University in 1958. After completing a successful career as a Marketing Executive for a number of international corporations including Colgate-Palmolive he began to look for a more meaningful career.  Today he serves as the Executive Director of the Petey Greene Prisoner Assistance Program.  Petey Greene is an independent non-profit that seeks to change the state of education in America's correctional facilities. Jim also serves as President of his Princeton Class of 1958.

 

 

William Wild graduated from Princeton University in June 2014. He was very involved in the Pace Center where he served as a three time Community Action Coordinator and Senior Fellow for Special Projects working with Pace Center students, staff and partner organizations to develop meaningful programming for incoming freshmen interested in civic engagement. In addition, he has an eye for media and design, having spurred an ongoing revamp of the Pace Center’s graphic identity.

 

“Because of their unique professional backgrounds and their deep roots in the Princeton community, these four Trustees will help the Center advance its mission to transform the lives of vulnerable young people, “ said Pam Gregory, Executive Director of PBC. 

 

About Princeton-Blairstown Center

For over 100 years, Princeton-Blairstown Center has provided adventure-based experiential education to at-risk urban youth. What began in 1908 as a summer camp run by Princeton University students to give inner-city boys an opportunity to have a character-building fresh air experience has evolved into a wide variety of year-round, multi-service, youth development experiential educational programs serving over 4,000 students from the Mid-Atlantic States.  For more information on PBC’s services or to donate, visit www.princetonblairstowncenter.org.
 

###

 

Valid from 07/14/2014 to 09/01/2014

Princeton Tops Football Preseason Poll for First Time Since 1992

08/05/2014

PRINCETON, N.J. -- In the closest call in six years, Princeton edged Harvard as the preseason favorite to capture the 2014 Ivy League football title in a vote by a selected panel of media representatives.

Princeton (8-2, 6-1 Ivy League in 2013) received nine of the 17 first-place votes and a total of 128 points, earning the preseason's top spot for the first time since 1992. Harvard (9-1, 6-1 Ivy) was just one point behind with the remaining eight first-place, making its seventh-straight year being voted either first or second in the League's preseason poll. The one-point difference is the narrowest margin since 2008 when Harvard and Yale tied for first with eight first-place votes and 124 total points each.   

Princeton and Harvard feature two of the top players in the Football Championship Subdivision and the League's reigning Players of the Year. Princeton senior quarterback Quinn Epperly is set to command the Tiger offense after a record-setting season a year ago when he became the first player in conference history to account for more than 40 touchdowns in one season (25 passing, 18 rushing). Epperly enters this season as one of the preseason candidates for Walter Payton Award, which recognizes the FCS Player of the Year.

On the other side of the ball, Harvard senior defensive end Zach Hodges is poised to once again anchor the Crimson's front seven. Hodges comes into his senior campaign as unanimous preseason All-America selection, receiving recognition on watch lists from the College Football Performance Awards, Butkus Award and Buck Buchanan Award.

Dartmouth (6-4, 5-2 Ivy) placed third with 91 points to receive its highest preseason ranking since 1997 when the Big Green was also picked to finish third. Head coach Buddy Teevens' squad features an Asa S. Bushnell Cup candidate of its own this year in his junior signal-caller Dalyn Williams. Williams developed into one of the FCS's top dual-threat quarterbacks after closing his sophomore campaign among the conference's top 10 leaders in both rushing and passing.

Penn (4-6, 3-4 Ivy) landed in the top half of the preseason poll for the 22nd consecutive season with spot in fourth with 79 points. The Quakers' streak dates back to head coach Al Bagnoli's second season roaming the Franklin Field sidelines. This season will be the last for Bagnoli leading the Red and Blue on the gridiron as he announced his retirement in April.

Yale (5-5, 4-3 Ivy) paced the second half of the preason poll in fifth place with 68 points, followed by Brown (6-4, 3-4 Ivy) in sixth with 65 points, Cornell (3-7, 2-5 Ivy) in seventh with 34 points and Columbia (0-10, 0-7 Ivy) in eighth with 20 points .

2014 IVY LEAGUE FOOTBALL PRESEASON MEDIA POLL
PREDICTED ORDER OF FINISH

First-Place Votes in Parentheses

Rank School Points
1. Princeton (9) 128
2. Harvard (8) 127
3. Dartmouth 91
4. Penn 79
5. Yale 68
6. Brown 65
7. Cornell 34
8. Columbia 20

Valid from 08/05/2014 to 09/30/2014

Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) Announces The Launch of Girls’ Leadership Programs

10/29/2014

Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC) is proud to announce the addition of Girls’ Leadership Programs to its strong portfolio of social and emotional development programming for young people.   The program launch date was October 11, 2014, as this date coincides with the International Day of the Girl, a globally recognized date designated by the United Nations in 2011.  PBC’s new programs have already received strong recognition.  They were identified as one of the year’s best examples of innovative girls’ leadership development by the International Day of the Girl Summit (www.dayofthegirlsummit.org) organizing committee.   The committee selected short videos of PBC’s programs, along with summaries of the curriculum, and featured them during the month of September in global webcasts leading up to planned celebrations at the United Nation scheduled for October 10th.   PBC leadership, along with the 12 young students who designed the Girls’ Leadership Programs, were invited to the United Nations’ celebration and were joined by over 500 girls and  girl-advocates from around the world, prominent members of the United Nations community, and government representatives from Canada, Peru, and Turkey.   

The Girls’ Leadership Programs were designed for girls by girls.  “We hoped that through these programs, girls would be able to discover themselves, connect to others, and would learn to take action,” said one of the girl designers, Aarushi, age 14. “By taking a different approach to helping girls build healthy relationships, promote cooperation and team building, resolve conflicts, advance diversity in a multicultural world, and feel connected to their communities, we know that we can give girls, especially those who need help, a new experience that may even change their lives.” 

The Girls’ Leadership Programs include 4 modules:

  • Dare to Discover Yourself – An introspective view of one’s own leadership journey
  • Connect to Courage – Creative ways to lead teams and understand others’ perspectives
  • Scientific Sleuths:  Environmental Expedition – Outdoor science exploration for girls
  • Spectacular Survival Skills – Preparedness for wilderness survival for girls

 

The Girls’ Leadership Programs received a partial sponsorship from Janssen Research & Development, LLC that will enable 25 at-risk girls who participate in PBC’s school-based programs at Rivera Middle School in Trenton, NJ, travel to the Blairstown Campus three times during the 2014-2015 school year and participate in a one-day Campus Expedition to Princeton University. 

 

“The Princeton-Blairstown Center is grateful to Janssen for sponsoring these transformative opportunities for both our curriculum developers and for the vulnerable girls who will benefit from Mercer County,” said Executive Director, Pam Gregory.  “There is a shortage of women leaders and part of our remedy is developing the pipeline by mentoring and coaching girls to challenge themselves and develop their leadership skills during our in-school programming and at our Outdoor Campus.  With this sponsorship, Janssen continues to demonstrate their deep commitment to the communities where their employees live and work.”

 

About PBC
PBC is an independent nonprofit with a mission to transform the lives of vulnerable young people through integrated experiential and adventure-based programming in schools and at our Blairstown Campus near the Delaware Water Gap. Our wide variety of year-round, multi service programs serve over 5,000 students from the Mid-Atlantic States.

 

For further information contact Sabrina Lopez at (609) 921-0070
slopez@princetonblairstown.org or visit www.princetonblairstown.org

Valid from 10/29/2014 to 12/15/2014

American Boychoir's “Home for the Holidays” Performance December 14

11/19/2014

Celebrated vocal ensemble presents The World Celebrates, a delightful and moving program of classic English carols intermixed with traditional seasonal offerings from around the globe including Cameroon, Venezuela, Nigeria, Spain, and Greece

Princeton, NJ –The American Boychoir, the world renowned vocal ensemble of the Princeton, NJ-based American Boychoir School, has been heralded as one of the nation’s premiere musical ensembles. Its mission is to sustain and move forward with a “distinctively American voice” the one-thousand-year-old boychoir school tradition. The American Boychoir is committed to being the finest choir of its kind in the nation and is recognized as among the finest ensembles in the world. 

The American Boychoir‘s Holiday Concerts are always a highlight of the busy holiday season. With an exquisite program of traditional carols and holiday classics, and a focus on seasonal offerings from a diverse range of countries, this year’s concerts promise to transport audiences to holiday celebrations near and far.  Program highlights include a selection of traditional works from Britten’s A Ceremony of Carols; beloved holiday favorites like Joy to the World, Mary Had a Baby, and Silent Night; He Came Down (Cameroon); Alegres Pregonan (Venezuela); Betelehemu (Nigeria); and many others! Truly, there is something for every member of the family in this not-to-be-missed hallmark of the holidays.

Join the American Boychoir at Richardson Auditorium at Alexander Hall (68 Nassau St, Princeton) on December 14, 2014 at 4:00 pm for a special “Home for the Holidays” performance.  This Princeton performance is an annual tradition that American Boychoir looks forward to sharing with the community each year. To purchase tickets to this not-to-be-missed American Boychoir performance, visit our website at www.americanboychoir.org.

Says Fernando Malvar-Ruiz, Litton-Lodal Music Director, “With all of the excitement of the season, we’ve designed our program to showcase many of the familiar holiday classics that we all hold dear to our hearts, but to also introduce our audiences to works from other countries that they might not be familiar with. The boys have immensely enjoyed learning these lesser-known pieces, and can’t wait to showcase them.  We know our Princeton area audience considers this annual concert as a highpoint to their holidays.”

The American Boychoir Holiday Tour commences on December 4 in Syracuse, then winds its way through New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey before concluding with a performance at New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art on December 16. 

 

American Boychoir Fall Tour

December 4

Our Lady of Pompei/St. Peter

Syracuse, NY

December 5

The Pawling Concert Series

Pawling, NY

December 14

Richardson Auditorium at Alexander Hall

Princeton, NJ

December 16

Metropolitan Museum of Art

New York, NY

In addition to its eagerly anticipated Holiday Concert tour this year, the American Boychoir makes its big screen debut in the feature film, Boychoir, starring Dustin Hoffmann, Kathy Bates, Josh Lucas, Garret Wareing, and featuring several American Boychoir School students and faculty in speaking and non-speaking roles.  Boychoir recently premiered to critical acclaim at the Toronto International Film Festival. The American Boychoir provides all of the vocal accompaniment to the film.

The American Boychoir School recently embarked on an ambitious National Talent Search Initiative with a goal of having at least one boy from all fifty states represented at the school and in the choir. At the end of each concert, a call for auditions is made and directors of local school and church choirs in the area are contacted to encourage nominations of local boys.

For more information on the American Boychoir, their season, and the National Talent Search Initiative visit www.americanboychoir.org.

About American Boychoir

The American Boychoir has long been recognized as one of the finest musical ensembles in the country. Under the leadership of Fernando Malvar-Ruiz, Litton-Lodal Music Director, the American Boychoir has dazzled audiences with its unique blend of musical sophistication, spirited presentation, and ensemble virtuosity. The Boychoir performs regularly with world-class orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and is often featured with such illustrious conductors as James Levine, Charles Dutoit, and Alan Gilbert. The American Boychoir is frequently invited to join internationally-renowned artists on stage, and the list of collaborators reflects the extraordinary range of the ensemble: from great classical artists such as Jessye Norman and Frederica von Stade to jazz legend Wynton Marsalis and pop icons Beyoncé and Sir Paul McCartney. The choir's young soloists are also in high demand and have joined forces with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, and Spoleto Festival USA, to name a few.  As an icon of American musical excellence, the Boychoir has been invited to sing for every sitting U.S. President since John F. Kennedy.  Touring frequently at home and abroad as preeminent ambassadors, the American Boychoir spreads messages of beauty and hope through outstanding musical achievement.

Boys in fourth through eighth grades, reflecting the ethnic, religious and cultural diversity of the United States, come from across the country and around the world to pursue a rigorous musical and academic curriculum at the American Boychoir School in Princeton, New Jersey.  While keeping up with their academic demands, the boys balance schoolwork with an intense national and international touring schedule.  In addition to the almost 100 solo concerts, the 2014-2015 season includes 2 engagements with the Philadelphia Orchestra, a month-long performance exhibit at the Gladstone Gallery in New York City, a performance at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 4 national tours and the release of a movie called “Boychoir” with Dustin Hoffman and Kathy Bates. The legacy of the American Boychoir is preserved through an extensive recording catalog, which boasts over 45 commercial recordings and the launch of its own label, Albemarle Records.

Valid from 11/19/2014 to 12/15/2014

McCarter Offers Special Offer for First Time Subscribers

08/06/2015

Valid from 08/06/2015 to 09/05/2015

Princeton Farmers' Market First Annual Cookbook Swap October 1

09/28/2015

The Princeton Farmers’ Market invites the Princeton community to participate in our very first PFM Cookbook Swap on Thursday, October 1 st from 11am to 4pm ! Looking to trade in some once loved now neglected cookbooks? Bored with your current recipe lineup or looking to try something new?

Stop by the market and p ass on your gently used or new cookbooks , food magazines, and /or other gastronomic articles in exchange for new - to - you recipes!

Culinary educator , author, and cookbook connoisseur Rachel Weston will host the cookbook swap, October 1 st at the Princeton Farmers’ Market on Hinds Plaza. Her book New Jersey Fresh: Four Season from Farm to Table , which includes a number of PFM vendors - Chickadee Creek Farm , Davidson ’ s Exotic Mushrooms, Fulper Farms, Jersey City Veggie Burgers, Tassot Apiaries, Terhune Orchards, Valley Shepherd Creamery and WildFlour Bakery/ Café - will also be available for purchase onsite.

Connect with your fellow neighbors and farmers’ market patrons over food and cooking, and while you’re here, pick up some fresh, local ingredi ents for your newest recipes!

Valid from 09/28/2015 to 10/02/2015

St. Paul School Earns Scholastic Olympics First Place, 2nd Consecutive Year

11/30/2015

 For the second consecutive year, the St. Paul School of Princeton eighth graders stepped up to the challenge and took home First Place at the recent 34th Annual Scholastic Olympics held in Trenton Catholic Academy in Hamilton.  Every year, grammar schools from throughout the Diocese of Trenton enter the competition, fielding teams of 14 students. Two students from each school compete in one of seven subject areas: Art, English, Math, Religion, Science, Social Studies, and Spelling. Competitors take a one hour test, and the top three students in each subject area are awarded gold, silver or bronze medals for their achievements. The school presenting  the most highly ranked participants is then awarded first place in the competition.

    

    Four SPS scholars earned medals for their academic scores:  Nolan Brody (1st place, Science), Molly Hart (1st place, English), Victoria Kovarik (1st place, Spelling) and

Kate Faranetta (2nd place, Art).

  

    Principal Ryan Killeen stated, "We are so proud of our students for their second consecutive win of First Place honors in the Trenton Catholic Academy Scholastic Olympics. The competition is the culmination of a tremendous effort on the part of our faculty and students and really is the result of years of work. The foundation begins in Kindergarten so our whole community celebrates this award and recognizes the priority we place on academics".

     

    The SPS team, steered by eighth grade teachers Ms. Sarah Beyer and Ms. Meghan Dwyer, practiced for several weeks leading up to the competition.  Faculty members  Arianna Tamasi, Sally Chrisman, Bob Goldman, Mary Dolan, and Ann Schwimmer were also involved in helping the students to prepare.

 

Pictured above are:

 

    1st Row L-R: Faythe Endres, Kate Faranetta, Gabriella Morabito, Victoria Kovarik, Nolan Brody

    2nd Row L-R: Alison Micale, Molly Hart, Catrina Nanney, Meghana Vishakanta, Luke Okupski

3rd Row L-R: Vice-Principal Salvatore Chiaravalloti, Jozef Nijs, Tyler Partnow, William Kelleher, Robert Hulbert

    

Valid from 11/30/2015 to 01/15/2016

"Princeton Tonight," Princeton University's First and Only Student Television Show Premiers Feb 27

02/19/2016

"Princeton Tonight," Princeton University's first and only student-run broadcast television show, will air its premiere episode on Saturday, February 27th. Hosted by Jordan Salama, the program features interviews with notable figures in the entertainment industry and beyond, as well as sketches and other pre-recorded comedy shorts.  The show is produced out of the Princeton University Broadcast Center in conjunction with Princeton Film Productions. 

The premiere episode features an interview and performance by Billy Joel band member Mike DelGuidice. DelGuidice's story is like no other: a self-taught musician, he's gone from playing piano bars at age 16 to touring the country with the Piano Man himself. 

The show will air throughout central New Jersey on Comcast and Verizon channel 20 at 8 p.m. A premiere screening event will be held in East Pyne 010 on Princeton University's campus at 8 p.m. and is open to the public. The episode will also be available on "Princeton Tonight's" YouTube channel (Princeton Tonight) shortly after it airs. Follow "Princeton Tonight" on Facebook (Princeton Tonight) and Twitter for updates and additional content.

Valid from 02/19/2016 to 02/28/2016

Princeton Community TV to Host Screenings of First Videos by Two Local Non-Profits Through New Program on March 2

02/24/2016

(Princeton, N.J. Feb. 23, 2016) Princeton Community Television will present a premiere screening of the first two films produced by local non-profits through its Community Partners Project on March 2nd at 6:30 pm. The screening will be held at Monument Hall (the former Princeton Borough Municipal Building). The Films were produced by Princeton Community Housing and the Princeton Youth Ballet. The screening is free and open to the public.

 

The Princeton Community Housing film tells the story of the work done by the non-profit, which develops and provides affordable housing in the Princeton community. The Princeton Youth Ballet film focuses on the dance company, formerly called “DanceVision,” which gives young people the opportunity to perform at a professional level in original productions for the community.

 

“We are excited to share the hard work that Princeton Community Housing and the Princeton Youth Ballet put into their projects.” Says George McCollough, Executive Director of Princeton Community TV. “We encourage the public to come out and celebrate their accomplishments.”

 

The videos were the first projects completed through Princeton TV’s Community Partners Project (CPP), which teaches documentary video and new media skills to non-profit organizations throughout Princeton and the greater Princeton area. The free program partners the non-profits with local professional filmmakers while Princeton TV provides all the instruction, technical assistance, equipment, and other production services needed to complete a documentary.

 

Edward Truscelli, executive director of Princeton Community Housing, said the Community Partners Project gave his organization a rare opportunity to tell the group’s story in a new medium.  “We always had a clear vision of the story we wanted to tell about the work we do,” Truscelli said. “The Community Partners Project was just what we needed. It provided us with the expertise, the guidance and the tools to effectively tell our story in the way we wanted to - and it provided us with a foundation of experience in the craft of producing a video that we will continue to use to tell the story of our organization .”

 

Princeton TV is currently accepting applications for the 2016 Community Partners Project.The deadline is April 18.  “We encourage all area non-profits to apply to CPP and take advantage of this wonderful opportunity,” McCullough said. ” More information is available at Princeton Community Television’s website, http://www.princetontv.org .

 


 

 

 

Valid from 02/24/2016 to 04/30/2016

Nassau Tennis Club Donates $3,000 to Montgomery Township First Responders

03/02/2016

L-r: Brian Hofacker – Police BA, Matthew Fedun – Fire Co #1, Adam Verducci – Fire Co #2, John Connacher – EMS, Ed Trzaska – Deputy Mayor, Benton Camper – Nassau Tennis Club

March 2, 2016 (Skillman, NJ) - Nassau Tennis Club’s 4th Annual President’s Day Weekend Community Tournament to benefit Montgomery First Responders was a huge success raising approximately $1,500.  The Nassau Tennis Club matched all donations and presented $3,000 to the 4 organizations that keep our citizens, homes and businesses safe.  “Every year this event grows bigger, allowing us to acknowledge the great work of our local heroes”, says Benton Camper, “and we are looking forward to even more community participation next year.”

2016 Tournament Results:

Men’s A Singles: Ben Lai, Winner & David Siegrist, Finalist

Women’s A Singles: Suzanne Mesko, Winner & Elisa Narsu, Finalist

Men’s B Singles: Parag Dalsania, Winner & Jim Gong, Finalist

Women’s Doubles: Janice Huang & Kristen Schlossberg, Winners & Mara Wilmot & Linda Haderer, Finalist

Men’s Doubles: Rudi Van Mol & Alan Rosenberg & Benton Camper III & William Camper

Mixed Doubles A: Shana Smith & Ben Lai, Winners & Friedel & Jim Stairiker, Finalists

Mixed Doubles B: Renee & Michael Eckstut, Winners & Jen Wysocki & Darrin Maconi, Finalists

Valid from 03/02/2016 to 04/15/2016

Princeton Symphony Orchestra Looks Forward to First Partnership with the Princeton Festival

05/25/2016

Princeton, NJ—The Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) is pleased to be partnering with the Princeton Festival and the Princeton Garden Theatre to present Voices of Light, an oratorio by Richard Einhorn with the 1928 silent film classic The Passion of Joan of Arc, on Thursday, June 9 at 8:30 pm at the Princeton University Chapel. It is a first collaboration of the orchestra with the Festival, made possible through the generous support of long-term PSO patrons Enea and Dave Tierno.

 

PSO Executive Director Marc Uys elaborated on the benefits of the new partnership, "The PSO is always looking for opportunities to work with other arts organizations in the community. This partnership with the Princeton Festival is ideal as it provides patrons and new audiences the chance to experience the excellence of PSO musicians in a unique setting, accompanying beautiful vocals with the added element of a classic film."

 

The Princeton Festival's General and Artistic Director Richard Tang Yuk is equally pleased with the collaboration. He said, "We are thrilled to be collaborating with the PSO on this very engaging and moving multi-media project"  

 

While the partnership with the Festival marks a new community relationship for the PSO, the orchestra has previously partnered with the Princeton Garden Theatre to market its Holiday and Saturday Evening POPS! movie concerts. The theatre will be hosting a free pre-concert event at 5 pm on June 9, A Conversation on Voices of Light/The Passion of Joan of Arc with composer Richard Einhorn, Princeton University's Andrew Lovett, and University of Notre Dame's Daniel Hobbins.

 

The Voices of Light concert will be conducted by Carmen Helena Tellez and feature soloists Jessica Beebe, soprano, Eve Gigliotti, mezzo, Casey Finnigan, Tenor, and Christopher Job, bass, the Notre Dame Vocale from the University of Notre Dame, and The Princeton Festival Chorus.

 

Tickets to Voices of Light are available at two general admission levels, $50 and $35, available through McCarter Theatre.

Valid from 05/25/2016 to 06/10/2016

Local Students Participate at First Annual NBT Science Symposium

05/27/2016

The first annual NBT Science Symposium  was  held at North Brunswick Township High School on Sunday May 22, 2016. The objective of the science fair was for students from the North Brunswick area to prove their talents  in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Pairs of students presented their hypothesis, demonstrations, and research to judges, parents and audiences. Our own CHPS grade 5 and 6 students were superstars! Aarav Gupta  teamed up with his friend, Aarav Hathiramani from Chapin School in Princeton, to win 2nd place in the middle school competition. Aarav and Aarav researched the Magnus Effect on spheres, then took it further to see if the effect held true on discs. With repeated trials and detailed study of data, Aarav and Aarav proved the Magnus Effect to not hold true to discs. Two of our fifth graders, Agni Rajinikanth and Anush Polamraju celebrated an esteemed first place for Best Research in Middle School.  

Brilliant work to all! Proclamations will be awarded to the winners to recognize their hard work in the coming weeks.

Valid from 05/27/2016 to 07/15/2016

Girl Scouts of Central & Southern NJ to Commemorate Girl Scouts "Building a Better World" With Its First Float in the 90th Anniversary Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade®

07/06/2016

Girl Scouts of Central & Southern NJ (GSCSNJ) joins in celebrating the season of giving and the positive impact Girl Scouts have on our community.

Cherry Hill, NJ—Today, GSCSNJ announces that the first Girl Scout-themed float —and the first by Girl Scouts of the USA— will be joining the 90th Anniversary Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade® on Thursday, November 24, 2016. On the float, girls will climb and belay on giant 3-D puzzle pieces of a globe, connecting the pieces by maneuvering mechanics and literally “building a better world.” This theme, prevalent throughout the float, reflects what Girl Scouts past and present have done and continue to do as they take action to address issues in their local communities and around the globe. In addition, the contemporary float design nods to the organization’s century of traditions, but highlights what today’s Girl Scouts embrace—discovering new things, participating in outdoor adventures, exploring science, technology, engineering, and math, creating positive change in the world, and taking the lead.

“What better way to champion the amazing things our Girl Scouts do every day than to give their accomplishments national visibility with a float in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade,” said Andrea Bastiani Archibald, Ph. D.,  Chief Girl Expert at Girl Scouts of the USA. “Girl Scouts across the nation positively impact our world by identifying problems in their communities and developing innovative solutions to address them.  Our intention is that, with our appearance in the parade, all girls will be inspired to realize their potential, encouraged to embrace challenges, and motivated to make a positive change in the world—and join us to do so!”  

On Thanksgiving Day, an audience of over 50 million will see a float that unmistakably conveys “Girl Scouts,” including two dozen Girl Scout badges representing everything from STEM and the outdoors to financial literacy and entrepreneurship, as well as a Gold Award symbol that celebrates this year’s centennial of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The Girl Scout-themed float, highlighting girls as an important resource capable of making great change to benefit our nation and beyond, showcases the organization’s focus on empowering girls to take the lead and explore fun, new things.

“We are thrilled to welcome Girl Scouts to the Macy’s parade family,” said Amy Kule, executive producer of Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. “For the past 90 years, the Macy’s parade has provided unparalleled entertainment for millions of people, spanning generations. We know the new Girl Scout float will showcase the fine work Girl Scouts do as they give back to their communities and explore science, technology, engineering, and math. We are eager to see this new float make its inaugural trip down the streets of Manhattan this November.”

 The 90th Anniversary Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade airs nationwide on NBC-TV, Thursday, November 24, 2016, from 9:00 a.m. to noon, in all time zones. For more information on Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, please visit macys.com/parade.

If you’re interested in learning more about Girl Scouts—joining, volunteering, or donating—visit www.girlscouts.org/join.

About Girl Scouts of Central & Southern NJ, Inc.

GSCSNJ is the premier organization serving 19,000 girls in over nine counties. GSCSNJ shapes leaders for tomorrow by empowering girls to take on bold challenges, discover their own passions and strengths, act with character, and engage fully in fun, relevant experiences that encourage friendships and build life-long skills.  For more information on how to join, volunteer, reconnect or donate to GSCSNJ, call (800) 582-7692 or visit http://www.gscsnj.org/.  You can also connect with GSCSNJ on Facebook.com/GSCSNJ or Twitter @GSCSNJ.

About Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade:

With more than 50 million viewers across the country and more than 3.5 million spectators who line up along the streets of New York City each year, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is a national icon that has grown into a world-famous holiday event. For 90 years, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade has marked the official start of the holiday season. Growing in size and scale, the parade proudly marches down a longer than two-mile route in New York City with more than 8,000 participants in tow, including Macy’s employees, their families, celebrities, athletes, clowns, and dance groups spreading holiday cheer. The parade also features America’s best marching bands, fabulous floats, and Macy’s signature giant helium character balloons.  For more information on Macy’s parade, please visit http://www.macys.com/parade or call the parade hotline at (212) 494-4495.

Valid from 07/06/2016 to 09/15/2016

Princeton Tonight to Premier First Episode October 30

10/26/2016

PRINCETON, October 24 , 2016 -- Princeton Tonight, Princeton University’s first and only broadcast television show, is returning for a second season on Sunday, October 30, 2016. Airing throughout cen tral New Jersey on Verizon channel 21 and Comcast channel 27. The episode will also be uploaded to Princeton Tonight’s YouTube channel.

The premiere episode will feature an interview with Grammy award - winning singer - songwriter Gaby Moreno. Also in the episode will be an interview with Sarah Violet - Bliss and Charles Rogers, co - creators and show runners of the upcoming TBS comedy, Search Party , as well as a performance by Baker and Goods! With sketch comedy, man on the street, games with geniuses, movie reviews, and more, Princeton Tonight is a show not to be missed!

Princeton Tonight is the brainchild of current Princeton sophomores Jordan Salama and Ryan Ozminkowski. Created in October 2015, the show is broadcast on cable TV throughout central New Jersey. The Princeton Tonight team is over 45 people strong, all of whom are Princeton undergraduates. The show features innovative and original segments fr om writers and actors throughout the University as well as celebrity interviews and musical performances. Featured guests have included Dave Coulier, Rob Cohen, Colin Gray, Mike DelGuidice, Khalil Muhammad, John Caglione, Jr., and others. Like Princeton To night on Facebook and follow us on Twitter ( @Ptontonight ) for more information about future episodes and live events!

Valid from 10/26/2016 to 10/31/2016

Hun School Hosts First Home Football Game Under Lights

10/27/2016

PRINCETON, NJ - The Hun School of Princeton played its first ever nighttime game on its campus on Saturday, Oct. 22, under a canopy of lights. A new student spirit group, The Fleet, cheered them on as the Raiders defeated Lawrenceville 46-13. 

Members of the Hun Student Government spearheaded the field lights initiative.

Student Government President Sophia Albanese '17 began working on the project last year. She and her colleagues proposed the event to the Administration and, once approved, the students obtained permits from the town of Princeton, notified the Edgerstoune Road neighbors, and rented the lights. Add in the cheering Fleet and a little hot chocolate, and the event was a memorable and raucous display of school spirit.

"The football game under the lights was great!" said Ms. Albanese. "So many kids, parents, and teachers came to watch and be part of the first-ever night game. This was unlike anything we have ever done at Hun. We seniors feel so lucky to have been a part of such an awesome high school experience.

"There were so many people involved in the planning," said Ms. Albanese. "I believe the success of the night was a tribute to all the people who worked so hard to make it happen. I think it set a great tone for this year, especially for future student events and school spirit."

The Fleet is a term used to describe Raider ships in the 1600's. Members of this new student group are not just athletic boosters: they plan to support all extra-curricular activities on and off campus. The group is led by seniors Patrick Nally '17, Abby Debebe '17, Cameron Cavanaugh '17 and Tanner Preston '17, who are eager to support their classmates with spirited and organized attendance at events such as concerts, plays, and sporting events. More than 300 students, faculty and staff members have expressed interest in joining the group, and students will get club credit for participation.

 

About The Hun School of Princeton: 

The Hun School of Princeton is a co-educational, private day and boarding school in Princeton, New Jersey. Individual attention and strong student-faculty relationships are the hallmarks of the School.  On the 45-acre campus between Philadelphia and New York City, student-centered, hands-on learning prepare students for the global community in which they will live and work. The Hun School is comprised of 640 students in its Middle School, Upper School, and Postgraduate Program. The Hun School is home to students from twenty-nine countries and sixteen states.

Valid from 10/27/2016 to 11/15/2016




© Princeton Online. All Rights Reserved.
Phone: 609-737-7901 Fax: 609-737-2512